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Overview

Addison-Wesley is pleased to offer this specially-priced update of Elliot Koffman and Frank Friedman's Fortran text. Assuming no prior knowledge of computers or programming, the authors teach effective problem-solving and program-design techniques. The text emphasizes a software engineering approach to program design and carefully applies a five-step problem-solving approach: problem specification, analysis, design, implementation, and testing/verification. Koffman and Friedman provide thorough coverage of Fortran 77, with special sections on Fortran 90, and the techniques learned serve as a solid foundation for future programming regardless of the language used.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201590623
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 8/19/1996
  • Edition description: 5TH UPDTD
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 664
  • Product dimensions: 7.33 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 1.17 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

This is a textbook for a first course in problem solving and programming methods using the Fortran language. It assumes no prior knowledge of computers or programming. A course in high-school algebra is sufficient mathematics background for most of the material in this textbook, except for a few scattered examples (marked as optional).

Although the language of the text is Fortran, its primary goal is to teach effective problem-solving and program-design techniques that are independent of the programming language used. For this reason, the text emphasizes a software engineering approach to program design and carefully applies a five-step problem-solving approach: problem specification, analysis, design, implementation, and testing/verification. This approach is applied uniformly to the solution of 26 case studies, many of which are more ambitious in scope than one normally finds in a programming text, extending over several pages. The longer case studies integrate material introduced over several chapters and more closely resemble real-world problems. The techniques used in their solution will serve the programming student well regardless of the language that he or she uses in the future.

New Chapter on C

Because we anticipate that today's students will be required to learn other programming languages besides Fortran, we have attempted to prepare them by providing a new chapter on C at the end of the book. Even though many instructors will prefer to skip this chapter entirely, we feel that some will want to use it to introduce the C language. We also believe it will be an important reference for students who may need tolearn C on their own for other courses or for employment. Because this chapter builds on programming concepts and examples that were covered in Fortran, it should make the transition to C much easier.

Engineering Emphasis

Fortran is a general-purpose language, and there are many Fortran programs in use today that perform vital operations in a variety of disciplines, from business and the humanities to engineering and science. Many of today's Fortran programming students, however, are engineering or science majors. Thus a major goal of this edition was to increase the emphasis on engineering and science applications of Fortran. We accomplished this by introducing 11 Fortran in Focus commentaries that describe how Fortran is used by engineering and scientists working in private industry and the government to solve today's pressing technological problems. We have also inserted over 50 new engineering/science projects, examples, and case studies. Finally, Chapter 2 now covers all aspects of using Fortran for computations, including the use of library functions. So that the book would continue to appeal to students in other fields, we have retained many of the general applications and examples.

Modularization

We firmly believe that learning how to write and use independent subprogram modules is one of the most important skills that a student can take away from an introductory programming course--particularly for a course in Fortran whose popularity is enhanced by its rich libraries of special-purpose routines. Thus we stress modularization in this textbook by introducing the use of Fortran's intrinsic functions early (Chapter 2) and by showing students how to write and call their own subprograms (Chapter 6). Each function and subroutine includes informal preconditions and postconditions as part of its interface section. Chapter 6 introduces the structure chart as another documentation tool that is useful for specifying the flow of control between a main program and its subprograms.

Arrays

Our coverage of arrays in Chapter 7 begins with five sections that do not use subprograms. This will enable instructors who prefer to cover arrays early to introduce the essentials of arrays at any point after Chapter 4 ("Repetition and Loops"). Chapter 8 discusses additional features of arrays such as multidimensional arrays, searching, and sorting, and includes a case study on image processing.

Fortran 90

Although Fortran 90 has been approved, it is still not in widespread use and Fortran 77 will continue to exist as an alternative standard. For this reason, we decided to use Fortran 77 in the main body of the text and to discuss Fortran 90 features only in separate, clearly distinguishable sections at the end of each chapter. These sections introduce those features of Fortran 90 that are relevant to the programming topics discussed in the particular chapter and may also include Fortran 90 features introduced in earlier chapters. These sections will be valuable for reference when Fortran 90 usage becomes more widespread.

The WHILE loop has been an important control structure for teaching structured programming in Fortran since the first edition of this book was published in 1977. For the convenience of those students who are unable to use the WHILE loop, we discuss in Appendix D how to write it in standard Fortran 77, and we include standard Fortran 77 code in all complete programs with WHILE loops.

Pedagogical Features

We employ many pedagogical features to enhance the usefulness of this book as a teaching tool. Some of these features are discussed below.

End-of-Section Exercises
Most sections end with a number of self-check exercises. These include exercises that require analysis of program segments as well as short programming exercises. Answers to these exercises appear at the back of the book.

End-of-Chapter Exercises and Projects
Each chapter ends with a set of quick-check exercises with answers. There are also chapter review exercises whose solutions appear at the back of the book. Finally, there is a set of programming projects whose solutions appear in the instructor's manual. The icons in the left margin denote particularly challenging projects.

Examples and Case Studies
The book contains a large number and variety of programming examples. Whenever possible, examples contain complete programs or subprograms rather than incomplete program fragments. There are also substantial case studies that help a student integrate and apply concepts studied over several chapters.

Syntax Display Boxes
The syntax displays describe the syntax and semantics of each new Fortran feature and also provide examples.

Program Style Sections
The programming style sections discuss issues of good programming style.

Error Discussions and Chapter Reviews
Each chapter ends with a discussion of common programming errors. A chapter review includes a table of newly introduced Fortran statements.

Appendixes and Supplements

A reference table of Fortran statements appears on the inside covers of the book. We have also included appendixes on Fortran library functions and character sets, MS-DOS, the Microsoft Fortran 77 compiler, and the Lahey Personal Fortran compiler, and on implementing the WHILE loop in Fortran 77.

Supplements include an instructor's manual with a program disk, which includes all the programs that appear in the book. We are very grateful to Thomas Cunningham at Indiana University for producing the instructor's manual.

Acknowledgments

Many people participated in the development of this book. A number of faculty members prepared a host of engineering examples, exercises, case studies, and programming projects for inclusion in this book. Their help was invaluable in increasing the number of engineering and science applications presented. They include Betty Barr, University of Houston; Bart Childs, Texas A&M University; Thomas Cunningham, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Jerry Dunn, Texas Tech University; Tom Kisko, University of Florida; and George Leach, St. Petersburg Jr. College.

The principal reviewers were most essential in suggesting improvements and finding errors. They include Stephen J. Allan, Utah State University; William Beckwith, Clemson University; John D. Carpinelli, New Jersey Institute of Technology; John J. Goda, Jr., Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. Rick Lejk, University of North Carolina; Philip Liu, Cornell University; Mary Louros, University of Southern California; Migri Prucz, West Virginia University; Howard Saltsburg, University of Rochester; James G. Schmolze, Tufts University; Charles J. Wertz, Buffalo State College; Frazer Williams, University of Nebraska; and Michael Zeiger, Eastern Michigan University.

We would also like to thank the coauthor of our C book, Jeri Hanly, for allowing us to use and adapt portions of this text in the chapter on C. Also, we would like to thank the reviewers of this chapter for their valuable in developing it.

Finally, a number of practicing engineers and scientists described how they use Fortran at work in the Fortran in Focus commentaries. They include John Cagney, Cummins Engine Company; Jerry Dusinski, Triangle Package Machinery Company; Howard Fishman, HMF Associates; Warren James, McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company; Jeffrey J. Jelicks, Somerset Technologies, Inc.; R.M. Jones, John J. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center; Rocky Nelson, McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company; Robert Panoff, North Carolina Supercomputing Center; Mark Potapczuk, NASA Lewis Research Center; Sal Profeta, Glaxo Pharmaceuticals; and Dan Wang, Metcalf & Eddy.

We are grateful to everyone above for their significant contributions.

The personnel at Addison-Wesley responsible for the production of this book worked diligently to meet a very demanding schedule. Our sponsoring editor, Susan Hartman, was closely involved in all phases of the manuscript preparation and provided much help and guidance. Andrea Danese helped coordinate the Fortran in Focus commentaries. Kathleen Manley supervised the production of the book. We are grateful to all of them for their considerable efforts on our behalf.

E.B.K
F.L.F.


020159062XP04062001
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Introduction To Computers And Programming.
Electronic Computers Then and Now.
Components of a Computer.
Overview of Programming Languages.
Preparing a Program for Processing and Execution.
Using a Computer.
Chapter Review.

2. Problem Solving And Fortran.
Problem Solving and Programming.
Applying the Software Engineering Method.
Case Study: Converting Units of Measurement.
Overview of Fortran.
Style and Format of Fortran Programs.
INTEGER, REAL, and CHARACTER Data Types.
Arithmetic Expressions.
Using Functions in Fortran.
Case Study: Finding the Value of a Coin Collection.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: Program Format.

3. Decisions And The If Statement.
Structured Programming and Control Structures.
Logical Expressions.
Comparing Character Data.
IF Statement.
Solving Problems with Decision Steps.
Case Study: Payroll Problem.
Case Study: Finding the Smallest of Three Numbers.
Case Study: Testing Column Safety.
Tracing an Algorithm or Program.
Solution by Analogy.
Case Study: Computing the Price of Concrete.
Other IF Statement Forms.
Case Study: Computing Compass Bearings.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: CASE Control Structure.

4. Repetition And Loops.
Repetition in Programs.
Case Study: Physics of Falling Bodies.
The General DO Loop.
Accumulating a Sum.
Case Study: Sum of Integers.
Generalizing a Solution.
Case Study: Average of a Set of Measurements.
Problem Solving Illustrated.
Case Study: Computing the Payroll for Several Employees.
Case Study: Approximating the Value of e.
The WHILE Loop.
Nested Control Structures.
Problem Solving Illustrated.
Case Study: Computing Radiation Levels.
Debugging and Testing Programs.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: DO Loops, EXIT, and CYCLE.

5. Format Statements And Introduction To Files.
Formatted Output.
Problem Solving Illustrated.
Case Study: Computing Maximum Tensile Loads.
Formatted Input.
More Edit Descriptors.
Files and Batch Processing.
Problem Solving Illustrated.
Case Study: Placement of Microwave Towers.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.

6. Top-Down Design With Subprograms.
User-Defined Functions.
Calling User-defined Functions.
Single-Statement Functions.
Case-Study: Newton's Method for Finding Roots.
Defining a Subroutine.
Calling a Subroutine.
Top-Down Design and Structure Charts.
Case-Study: Computing Maximum Tensile Loads with Subprograms.
Debugging and Testing a Program System.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: Recursion and Internal Subprograms.

7. Arrays.
Declaring and Referencing Arrays.
Array Subscripts.
Using DO Loops to Process Arrays.
Input and Output of Arrays.
Using Formats with Arrays.
Array Arguments.
Case Study: Finding the Area of a Polygon.
The DATA Statement.
Array Processing Illustrated.
Case Study: Budget Problem.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: Array Operations.

8. More Arrays And Subprograms.
Multidimensional Arrays.
Multidimensional Array Arguments.
Case Study: Image Enhancement.
Searching an Array.
Sorting an Array.
Using Subprograms in a Large-Scale Program.
Case Study: Grading Problem.
The SAVE Statement and Simulation.
COMMON Blocks.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.
Fortran 90 Features: Matrix Operations and Modules.

9. Sequential And Direct Access Files.
Sequential Files.
Problem Solving Illustrated.
Case Study: Merging Files.
Case Study: Land Boundary Survey.
Direct Access Files.
Updating a Direct Access File.
Case Study: Direct Access File Update.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.

10. String Manipulation.
Character String Declaration.
Substrings.
Character Expressions.
String Comparisons.
String Length and Search Functions.
Examples of String Manipulation.
Case Study: Generating Cryptograms.
Case Study: Scanning a DO Loop Header.
Case Study: Text Editing Problem.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.

11. On To C.
Overview of C.
Data Types, Expressions, and Library Functions.
Functions with Input Arguments.
Functions with Output Arguments.
Decision Control Structures.
Loop Control Structures.
Arrays.
Multidimensional Arrays.
Strings and Characters.
Sequential Files.
Common Programming Errors.
Chapter Review.

Appendix A: Fortran Library Functions.
Appendix B: Character Sets.
Appendix C: Introduction to MS-DOS, Microsoft Fortran, and Lahey Personal Fortran.
Appendix D: Implementing the WHILE Loop in Standard Fortran.
Answers to Self-Check Exercises.
Answers to Review Questions.
Index.
Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE

This is a textbook for a first course in problem solving and programming methods using the Fortran language. It assumes no prior knowledge of computers or programming. A course in high-school algebra is sufficient mathematics background for most of the material in this textbook, except for a few scattered examples (marked as optional).

Although the language of the text is Fortran, its primary goal is to teach effective problem-solving and program-design techniques that are independent of the programming language used. For this reason, the text emphasizes a software engineering approach to program design and carefully applies a five-step problem-solving approach: problem specification, analysis, design, implementation, and testing/verification. This approach is applied uniformly to the solution of 26 case studies, many of which are more ambitious in scope than one normally finds in a programming text, extending over several pages. The longer case studies integrate material introduced over several chapters and more closely resemble real-world problems. The techniques used in their solution will serve the programming student well regardless of the language that he or she uses in the future.

New Chapter on C

Because we anticipate that today's students will be required to learn other programming languages besides Fortran, we have attempted to prepare them by providing a new chapter on C at the end of the book. Even though many instructors will prefer to skip this chapter entirely, we feel that some will want to use it to introduce the C language. We also believe it will be an important reference for students who may need tolearn C on their own for other courses or for employment. Because this chapter builds on programming concepts and examples that were covered in Fortran, it should make the transition to C much easier.

Engineering Emphasis

Fortran is a general-purpose language, and there are many Fortran programs in use today that perform vital operations in a variety of disciplines, from business and the humanities to engineering and science. Many of today's Fortran programming students, however, are engineering or science majors. Thus a major goal of this edition was to increase the emphasis on engineering and science applications of Fortran. We accomplished this by introducing 11 Fortran in Focus commentaries that describe how Fortran is used by engineering and scientists working in private industry and the government to solve today's pressing technological problems. We have also inserted over 50 new engineering/science projects, examples, and case studies. Finally, Chapter 2 now covers all aspects of using Fortran for computations, including the use of library functions. So that the book would continue to appeal to students in other fields, we have retained many of the general applications and examples.

Modularization

We firmly believe that learning how to write and use independent subprogram modules is one of the most important skills that a student can take away from an introductory programming course—particularly for a course in Fortran whose popularity is enhanced by its rich libraries of special-purpose routines. Thus we stress modularization in this textbook by introducing the use of Fortran's intrinsic functions early (Chapter 2) and by showing students how to write and call their own subprograms (Chapter 6). Each function and subroutine includes informal preconditions and postconditions as part of its interface section. Chapter 6 introduces the structure chart as another documentation tool that is useful for specifying the flow of control between a main program and its subprograms.

Arrays

Our coverage of arrays in Chapter 7 begins with five sections that do not use subprograms. This will enable instructors who prefer to cover arrays early to introduce the essentials of arrays at any point after Chapter 4 ("Repetition and Loops"). Chapter 8 discusses additional features of arrays such as multidimensional arrays, searching, and sorting, and includes a case study on image processing.

Fortran 90

Although Fortran 90 has been approved, it is still not in widespread use and Fortran 77 will continue to exist as an alternative standard. For this reason, we decided to use Fortran 77 in the main body of the text and to discuss Fortran 90 features only in separate, clearly distinguishable sections at the end of each chapter. These sections introduce those features of Fortran 90 that are relevant to the programming topics discussed in the particular chapter and may also include Fortran 90 features introduced in earlier chapters. These sections will be valuable for reference when Fortran 90 usage becomes more widespread.

The WHILE loop has been an important control structure for teaching structured programming in Fortran since the first edition of this book was published in 1977. For the convenience of those students who are unable to use the WHILE loop, we discuss in Appendix D how to write it in standard Fortran 77, and we include standard Fortran 77 code in all complete programs with WHILE loops.

Pedagogical Features

We employ many pedagogical features to enhance the usefulness of this book as a teaching tool. Some of these features are discussed below.

End-of-Section Exercises
Most sections end with a number of self-check exercises. These include exercises that require analysis of program segments as well as short programming exercises. Answers to these exercises appear at the back of the book.

End-of-Chapter Exercises and Projects
Each chapter ends with a set of quick-check exercises with answers. There are also chapter review exercises whose solutions appear at the back of the book. Finally, there is a set of programming projects whose solutions appear in the instructor's manual. The icons in the left margin denote particularly challenging projects.

Examples and Case Studies
The book contains a large number and variety of programming examples. Whenever possible, examples contain complete programs or subprograms rather than incomplete program fragments. There are also substantial case studies that help a student integrate and apply concepts studied over several chapters.

Syntax Display Boxes
The syntax displays describe the syntax and semantics of each new Fortran feature and also provide examples.

Program Style Sections
The programming style sections discuss issues of good programming style.

Error Discussions and Chapter Reviews
Each chapter ends with a discussion of common programming errors. A chapter review includes a table of newly introduced Fortran statements.

Appendixes and Supplements

A reference table of Fortran statements appears on the inside covers of the book. We have also included appendixes on Fortran library functions and character sets, MS-DOS, the Microsoft Fortran 77 compiler, and the Lahey Personal Fortran compiler, and on implementing the WHILE loop in Fortran 77.

Supplements include an instructor's manual with a program disk, which includes all the programs that appear in the book. We are very grateful to Thomas Cunningham at Indiana University for producing the instructor's manual.

Acknowledgments

Many people participated in the development of this book. A number of faculty members prepared a host of engineering examples, exercises, case studies, and programming projects for inclusion in this book. Their help was invaluable in increasing the number of engineering and science applications presented. They include Betty Barr, University of Houston; Bart Childs, Texas A&M University; Thomas Cunningham, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Jerry Dunn, Texas Tech University; Tom Kisko, University of Florida; and George Leach, St. Petersburg Jr. College.

The principal reviewers were most essential in suggesting improvements and finding errors. They include Stephen J. Allan, Utah State University; William Beckwith, Clemson University; John D. Carpinelli, New Jersey Institute of Technology; John J. Goda, Jr., Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. Rick Lejk, University of North Carolina; Philip Liu, Cornell University; Mary Louros, University of Southern California; Migri Prucz, West Virginia University; Howard Saltsburg, University of Rochester; James G. Schmolze, Tufts University; Charles J. Wertz, Buffalo State College; Frazer Williams, University of Nebraska; and Michael Zeiger, Eastern Michigan University.

We would also like to thank the coauthor of our C book, Jeri Hanly, for allowing us to use and adapt portions of this text in the chapter on C. Also, we would like to thank the reviewers of this chapter for their valuable in developing it.

Finally, a number of practicing engineers and scientists described how they use Fortran at work in the Fortran in Focus commentaries. They include John Cagney, Cummins Engine Company; Jerry Dusinski, Triangle Package Machinery Company; Howard Fishman, HMF Associates; Warren James, McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company; Jeffrey J. Jelicks, Somerset Technologies, Inc.; R.M. Jones, John J. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center; Rocky Nelson, McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company; Robert Panoff, North Carolina Supercomputing Center; Mark Potapczuk, NASA Lewis Research Center; Sal Profeta, Glaxo Pharmaceuticals; and Dan Wang, Metcalf & Eddy.

We are grateful to everyone above for their significant contributions.

The personnel at Addison-Wesley responsible for the production of this book worked diligently to meet a very demanding schedule. Our sponsoring editor, Susan Hartman, was closely involved in all phases of the manuscript preparation and provided much help and guidance. Andrea Danese helped coordinate the Fortran in Focus commentaries. Kathleen Manley supervised the production of the book. We are grateful to all of them for their considerable efforts on our behalf.

E.B.K
F.L.F.


Read More Show Less

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