The Forty Days of Musa Dagh

The Forty Days of Musa Dagh

4.6 7
by Franz Werfel
     
 

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The book that first drew America's attention to the Armenian Genocide, which began 100 years ago on April 24, 1915.

The Forty Days of Musa Dagh is Franz Werfel's masterpiece, bringing him international acclaim and a BOMC Main Selection.

First published in 1933, the chilling and riveting story takes place along the Anatolian coast in the mountain villages

Overview

The book that first drew America's attention to the Armenian Genocide, which began 100 years ago on April 24, 1915.

The Forty Days of Musa Dagh is Franz Werfel's masterpiece, bringing him international acclaim and a BOMC Main Selection.

First published in 1933, the chilling and riveting story takes place along the Anatolian coast in the mountain villages that chose to disobey the deportation order of the Turkish government, fearlessly repelling Turkish soldiers and police throughout the summer of 1915. Most significantly, it is the first book to deal seriously with "ethnic cleansing," an early clarion call that some heard but few heeded. This edition presents the first full English translation, with an introduction by Vartan Gregorian.

In every sense, a true and thrilling novel.—The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781567924077
Publisher:
Godine, David R. Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
03/07/2012
Pages:
824
Sales rank:
232,300
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.50(h) x 2.10(d)

Meet the Author

Franz Werfel, the great German-language poet, essayist, novelist, and dramatist, was born in Prague in 1890. He married Alma Mahler-Gropius in 1929 and lived in Vienna, where he wrote his masterpiece, The Forty Days of Musa Dagh (1933; Godine edition, 2012), until the Anschluss in 1938. Werfel and his wife fled to France, and then to the United States. Like many German émigrés, they settled in Los Angeles, where Werfel died in 1945.

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The Forty Days of Musa Dagh 4.6 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
How do I begin describing this book? this marvelous novel penned by an Austrian writer who was not indebted to the Armenian people and owed them nothing. How do I describe and compress this eight-hundred page long book into a miniscule summary? The truth of the matter is, is that words alone cannot describe Franz Werfel's 'The Forty Days of Musa Dagh'. It is too grand a story that should, rather, be read by everyone and experienced to the greatest extent possible in the human spirit. The novel revolves around the life and culture of the Armenian people in a Western region of Syria in 1915. The Ottoman Empire, lead by the Young Turkish leadership have enacted the state-wide policy of genocide against the Armenians. Sensing the impending the danger, the 4,000 people of this region are forced to take shelter on the towering and biblical mountain of Musa Dagh. With a Turkish military force encircling the mountain, it is up to the Armenians to defend their way of life or die and vanish into history. I do not wish to impede on others' reviews and assert my position on whether or not they are correct, it is their opinions after all however, those who gave this book a one star rating did it out of malice and contempt over what they see as a misrepresentation of their country's history. Rather they looked at what the book was professing about and instead of placing what they thought of a well-written novel, they placed their version of the events of 1915. It is of no matter, it is up to the reader to gain an understanding from what the reviewer provides. Werfel composes a beaufiful note which instills the reader's spirt with much more than words, it gives them hope, it gives them proof that perhaps there are happy and positive stories that stem from tragedies. Werfel couldn't have done it any better.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This half forgotten author wrote a masterpeace of the half forgotten fate of the first genocide of the 20th century
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read this book three times: at age 18 (in Hungarian), and at age 38 and 60 respectively, in English. No book I've ever read in my lifetime left me with such a deep understanding of how history and human tragedy are intimately intertwined. A true masterpiece! Thank you Franz Werfel for giving humanity such a legacy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago