Forty Stories: New Writing from Harper Perennial

Forty Stories: New Writing from Harper Perennial

2.6 8
by Harper Perennial
     
 

Forty Stories is the first long-form work published under the aegis of Fifty-Two Stories, the short fiction blog of Harper Perennial. Since its inception in 2009, Fifty-Two Stories (www.fiftytwostories.com) has hosted work by writers both new and established, including Neil Gaiman, Louise Erdrich, Mary Gaitskill, Dennis Cooper, Jennifer Haigh, Tom Piazza,

Overview

Forty Stories is the first long-form work published under the aegis of Fifty-Two Stories, the short fiction blog of Harper Perennial. Since its inception in 2009, Fifty-Two Stories (www.fiftytwostories.com) has hosted work by writers both new and established, including Neil Gaiman, Louise Erdrich, Mary Gaitskill, Dennis Cooper, Jennifer Haigh, Tom Piazza, Lydia Peelle, Willy Vlautin, Marcy Dermansky, and more. Fifty-Two Stories has attracted particular attention for the early exposure it has given to innovative young writers such as Blake Butler, Ben Greenman, Amelia Gray, Seth Fried, and Catherine Lacey.

Forty Stories features work by Harper Perennial authors including Butler, Greenman, Elizabeth Crane, Adam Wilson, Matthew Norman, and Greg Bardsley. It also includes stories by novelists Jess Walter (Beautiful Ruins) and Shane Jones (Daniel Fights a Hurricane), and acclaimed short-form writers Jamie Quatro (I Want to Show You More), Roxane Gay, and Lindsay Hunter. New voices include Nigerian writer Adetokunbo Abiola; recent Center for Fiction fellow Mitchell S. Jackson; and adult film actress Kayden Kross.

The full list of contributors includes: Adetokunbo Abiola • David Backer • Greg Bardsley • Daniel Browne • Blake Butler • Elizabeth Crane • Laura Jane Faulds • Kelli Ford • D. Foy • Roxane Gay • Sharon Goldner • Ben Greenman • Jim Hanas • Brandon Hobson • Lindsay Hunter • Mitchell S. Jackson • Shane Jones • Kayden Kross • Catherine Lacey • O. A. Lindsey • Karon Luddy • Alexander Lumans • Scott McClanahan • Mesha Maren • Tessa Mellas • Kyle Minor • Matthew Norman • Nathan Oates • Eric Raymond • Alan Rossi • Jamie Quatro • Michael Ramberg • Joseph Scapellato • Eliezra Schaffzin • Matt Stewart • Jess Walter • David Williams • Adam Wilson • Paula Younger

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062239068
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/17/2012
Series:
eBook Original
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
464
Sales rank:
361,405
File size:
3 MB

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Forty Stories: New Writing from Harper Perennial 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm writing my own short story currently, so I picked this up to learn more about them. But, compared to the short stories I've read in the past, this was terrible. It might as well have been written by a bunch of two year olds having sexual fantasies! Litterally! Don't waste your device's memory storage. This is basically a collection of short stories that try to impress by using sex and swear words rather than using real, good writing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Definitely a good book worth exploring. 40 short stories for free! Particularly good reading while commuting via public transit. There are definitely stories that make you think as well as a few stories that are pretentious. There was one story that I totally couldn't follow and just skipped but that's the great thing about this book...there' s more stories to read! I read 39 of the stories and enjoyed all of them on some level. I also discovered an author, Matthew Norman, whose work I plan to explore further. Give it a try, you may be pleasantly surprised.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT WAS A GREAT BOOK
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Authors keep tryingl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I hated every one of these stories. Only one character in one story was at all sympathetic. Some of them died at the end, but they all should have! Many stories just quit mid thought. Writing level was either sophomoric or pretentious. If only there were zero stars. Not worth free!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First of all, I did get this for free. I can't speak for the person who wrote the previous review. I have read a few of these stories already. Like any short story collection, some are better than others. I thought the first one was really good--I had to go back and re-read it to figure it out. It made you think. I enjoy the short story genre and these (so far) can stand with any others I have read.