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Forty Years After

Overview

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
the campaign, after the first few days, was never really in doubt. The Barrier Of LitGE Compare this drama of five weeks with the opening of the war of 1914, and the contrast is vivid and striking. On August and the Germans ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
the campaign, after the first few days, was never really in doubt. The Barrier Of LitGE Compare this drama of five weeks with the opening of the war of 1914, and the contrast is vivid and striking. On August and the Germans violated the neutrality of Luxemburg and probably made a raid over the frontier at Longwy or Cirey. On August 3rd and 4th Belgium was invaded in defiance of all the treaties. On the 5th and 6th commenced the struggle before Li6ge, in which the Belgians obstinately, and successfully, resisted the attacks of the invading army. On the 7th, so greatly had the Germans suffered in these engagements, an armistice was asked for and refused. On the same day, in another part of the theatre of war, in Alsace, the French had commenced offensive operations and captured Altkirch. On August 12th and 13th took place the fights at Haelen and Eghezee, followed on the 15th by a serious battle at Dinant, in which the French prevented an attempted crossing of the River Meuse and recaptured Dinant itself which had been taken by the enemy. The British Expeditionary Force was safely landed on the French coast and sent to join theFrench and Belgian army somewhere in the neighbourhood of Brussels. An important combat near Brussels, extending over several miles, began on the 17th, and the Belgian capital was evacuated. Progress Of The War It is clear then that the military operations in the present war did not bring about, during the early weeks, the big battles that were expected. The reason istolerably plain. Evidently the Germans thought that they could sweep with ease through Belgium. The fact that for some days they knocked their heads in vain against the forts of Liege opened their eyes to the magnitude of the task they had undertaken. Perhaps the War Staff in Berlin t...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781145551640
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 2/24/2010
  • Pages: 210
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Read an Excerpt


the campaign, after the first few days, was never really in doubt. The Barrier Of LitGE Compare this drama of five weeks with the opening of the war of 1914, and the contrast is vivid and striking. On August and the Germans violated the neutrality of Luxemburg and probably made a raid over the frontier at Longwy or Cirey. On August 3rd and 4th Belgium was invaded in defiance of all the treaties. On the 5th and 6th commenced the struggle before Li6ge, in which the Belgians obstinately, and successfully, resisted the attacks of the invading army. On the 7th, so greatly had the Germans suffered in these engagements, an armistice was asked for and refused. On the same day, in another part of the theatre of war, in Alsace, the French had commenced offensive operations and captured Altkirch. On August 12th and 13th took place the fights at Haelen and Eghezee, followed on the 15th by a serious battle at Dinant, in which the French prevented an attempted crossing of the River Meuse and recaptured Dinant itself which had been taken by the enemy. The British Expeditionary Force was safely landed on the French coast and sent to join theFrench and Belgian army somewhere in the neighbourhood of Brussels. An important combat near Brussels, extending over several miles, began on the 17th, and the Belgian capital was evacuated. Progress Of The War It is clear then that the military operations in the present war did not bring about, during the early weeks, the big battles that were expected. The reason is tolerably plain. Evidently the Germans thought that they could sweep with ease through Belgium. The fact that for some days they knocked their heads in vain against the forts of Liege opened theireyes to the magnitude of the task they had undertaken. Perhaps the War Staff in Berlin t...
Read More Show Less

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