Foundations of Python Network Programming

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Overview

To guide readers through the new scripting language, Python, this book discusses every aspect of client and server programming. And as Python begins to replace Perl as a favorite programming language, this book will benefit scripters and serious application developers who want a feature-rich, yet simple language, for deploying their products.

The text explains multitasking network servers using several models, including forking, threading, and non-blocking sockets. Furthermore, ...

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Overview

To guide readers through the new scripting language, Python, this book discusses every aspect of client and server programming. And as Python begins to replace Perl as a favorite programming language, this book will benefit scripters and serious application developers who want a feature-rich, yet simple language, for deploying their products.

The text explains multitasking network servers using several models, including forking, threading, and non-blocking sockets. Furthermore, the extensive examples demonstrate important concepts and practices, and provide a cadre of fully-functioning stand alone programs. Readers may even use the provided examples as building blocks to create their own software.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590593714
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 8/18/2004
  • Series: Foundations Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 536
  • Product dimensions: 1.09 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 9.25 (d)

Meet the Author

John Goerzen is an accomplished author, system administrator, and Python programmer. He has been a Debian developer since 1996 and is currently president of Software in the Public Interest, Inc. His previously published books include the Linux Programming Bible, Debian Unleashed, and Linux Unleashed.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction to client/server networking 3
Ch. 2 Network clients 19
Ch. 3 Network servers 35
Ch. 4 Domain name system 65
Ch. 5 Advanced network operations 87
Ch. 6 Web client access 113
Ch. 7 Parsing HTML and XHTML 127
Ch. 8 XML and XML-RPC 145
Ch. 9 E-mail composition and decoding 169
Ch. 10 Simple message transport protocol 197
Ch. 11 POP 211
Ch. 12 IMAP 223
Ch. 13 FTP 275
Ch. 14 Database clients 295
Ch. 15 SSL 321
Ch. 16 SocketServer 341
Ch. 17 SimpleXMLRPCServer 355
Ch. 18 CGI 369
Ch. 19 modöpython 393
Ch. 20 Forking 419
Ch. 21 Threading 443
Ch. 22 Asynchronous communication 469
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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2004

    easy network programming

    In any computer language, network programming can be a miserable task. Witness the classic BSD and System V sockets and their usages under unix of the 1980s. Very powerful, yes. But equivalent to writing in assembly. Which brings us to one of the major attractions of a recent language like Python. If you learn best by example, then Goerzen may have done you a big favour. In some 175 example programs, he shows many ways to reach out across a network with Python. The book is not heavy on any abstruse theory or model. No talk of patterns or refactoring. But in fact, you can choose to regard some of the programs as equivalent to patterns of network usage under the language. Each chapter gives nontrivial code. You can see how Python comes with many routines that subsume grotty low level network details. Reduces the level of complexity that you have to deal with, and so improves your productivity with Python. The book's blurb says Python is replacing Perl. Really? That should be taken with several grains of salt. I'll leave it to other reviewers to take up this point. The only problem I have is with one aspect of Python. Not the author's fault, of course. But statements do not have to be terminated with a semicolon?! Crikey. C, C++, Pascal, Java and C# all enforce a semicolon. Not doing so takes us back to Fortran. Yeah, I know, once you get into coding Python, you get used to this. Purely a stylistic gripe. But still...

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