Foundations of Python Network Programming

Foundations of Python Network Programming

4.0 1
by John Goerzen
     
 

* Covers low-level networking in Python —essential for writing a new networked application protocol.

* Many working examples demonstrate concepts in action -- and can be used as starting points for new projects.

* Networked application security is demystified.

* Exhibits and explains multitasking network servers using several models, including

Overview

* Covers low-level networking in Python —essential for writing a new networked application protocol.

* Many working examples demonstrate concepts in action -- and can be used as starting points for new projects.

* Networked application security is demystified.

* Exhibits and explains multitasking network servers using several models, including forking, threading, and non-blocking sockets.

* Features extensive coverage of Web and E-mail.

Describes Python's database APIs.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590593714
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
08/17/2004
Series:
Foundations Series
Edition description:
1st Corrected ed. 2004. Corr. 3rd printing 2004
Pages:
536
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 9.25(d)

Meet the Author

John Goerzen is an accomplished author, system administrator, and Python programmer. He has been a Debian developer since 1996 and is currently president of Software in the Public Interest, Inc. His previously published books include the Linux Programming Bible, Debian Unleashed, and Linux Unleashed.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Foundations of Python Network Programming 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In any computer language, network programming can be a miserable task. Witness the classic BSD and System V sockets and their usages under unix of the 1980s. Very powerful, yes. But equivalent to writing in assembly. Which brings us to one of the major attractions of a recent language like Python. If you learn best by example, then Goerzen may have done you a big favour. In some 175 example programs, he shows many ways to reach out across a network with Python. The book is not heavy on any abstruse theory or model. No talk of patterns or refactoring. But in fact, you can choose to regard some of the programs as equivalent to patterns of network usage under the language. Each chapter gives nontrivial code. You can see how Python comes with many routines that subsume grotty low level network details. Reduces the level of complexity that you have to deal with, and so improves your productivity with Python. The book's blurb says Python is replacing Perl. Really? That should be taken with several grains of salt. I'll leave it to other reviewers to take up this point. The only problem I have is with one aspect of Python. Not the author's fault, of course. But statements do not have to be terminated with a semicolon?! Crikey. C, C++, Pascal, Java and C# all enforce a semicolon. Not doing so takes us back to Fortran. Yeah, I know, once you get into coding Python, you get used to this. Purely a stylistic gripe. But still...