×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Founding Zealots
     

Founding Zealots

5.0 1
by Thomas W. Hagedorn
 

See All Formats & Editions

AMERICAN HISTORY/EDUCATION/RELIGION

“Religion, morality, and knowledge being essentially necessary to good
government… schools…shall forever be encouraged...”

When Thomas Hagedorn stumbled across those fifteen words in Ohio’s first Constitution, he had no idea that it would lead him on a 20-year quest to answer

Overview

AMERICAN HISTORY/EDUCATION/RELIGION

“Religion, morality, and knowledge being essentially necessary to good
government… schools…shall forever be encouraged...”

When Thomas Hagedorn stumbled across those fifteen words in Ohio’s first Constitution, he had no idea that it would lead him on a 20-year quest to answer one simple question:

How could Ohio’s first public schools have promoted morality and religion, when today they are either indifferent or hostile to those values?

After studying hundreds of old letters, diaries, reports, and biographies he discovered that the teaching of religion and morality was commonplace, not only in Ohio’s first government schools, but all across 19th century America. Surprisingly, he found that most historians have ignored the Christian philosophy, motives, and leaders that laid the foundation of that vital institution. For the first time, Founding Zealots tells the entertaining and dramatic story of this five-decade-long struggle, the men who fought it, and the reasons why other historians have instead left us with a very different, much more secular account.

Based upon exhaustive research, Founding Zealots shows that:

• Horace Mann’s role as the founder of our public schools is a myth.
• Evangelicals--many of them devout ministers and missionaries--started the schools primarily to promote Christian evangelism and discipleship.
• Marxist theories underlay several of the accounts of mainstream historians.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940016560748
Publisher:
Xulon Press
Publication date:
05/15/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
372
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Thomas W. Hagedorn has been researching the origins of America’s public schools for twenty years. A member of six professional organizations in history and education, he has presented papers at three academic conferences. He earned a BS (cum laude) and an MBA, both from the University of Cincinnati, and the CPA certificate. While researching air pollution in college he co-authored two articles in scholarly journals. He lives in Cincinnati with his wife, Mary, and they have two adult daughters, Heather and Allison.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Founding Zealots 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ReadersFavorite More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Barbara Peterson for Readers' Favorite Author Thomas Hagedorn begins his narrative in 1783. Just after the end of the Revolutionary War, the United States had so many debts that it was unable to give back pay to Army officers and enlisted men who had fought during the war, let alone the plots of lands in the West that they had been promised. How does a fledgling nation that has just won its freedom develop a workable government and pay off its debts? Hagedorn delves deeply into American history – not just the history of public schools but of the United States itself and its expansion westward, because all of this is inextricably intertwined. I’d frankly never realized that one of the main reasons why the United States expanded westward was as a means of paying off the debts it owed to its solders...or that American Indians of the time actually had to give reparations to the United States because they’d fought with the British! Author Hagedorn follows his subject in chronological order from March, 1783 when General Washington effectively put down the “Newburgh Conspiracy,” in which officers of the Continental Army were being encouraged to mutiny against the Confederate Congress in order to gain the back pay and Western lands that had been promised to them. From this introduction, Hagedorn takes us to the nitty gritty, starting with the Reverend Manasseh Cutler, who in 1787 travels to New York to lobby Congress for “land in the Ohio Country for his Yankee friends and guaranteeing those would-be pioneers that they could bring their government and their culture with them.” Cutler is the founder of the movement – his son Ephraim Cutler and other Calvinists continue it for the next sixty years and thirty territories/states. Founding Zealots is densely written and reflects Hagedorn’s twenty years of research, not only into the history of the fight of several determined parties – New Englanders and Calvinists - to found public schools where “teaching of religion and morality was more important than any other school activity” and those who wished to prevent them, but also the concurrent political and economic factions and the social history of the time. As befits a scholarly work – although this book is well-written and, by concentrating on specific individuals, keeps our interest – there are detailed notes and references. This book will be of interest to religious scholars, education scholars, and students of American history. Highly recommended.