The Fountains of Paradise

The Fountains of Paradise

3.5 16
by Arthur C. Clarke, Marc Vietor
     
 

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In the 22nd century visionary scientist Vannevar Morgan conceives the most grandiose engineering project of all time, and one which will revolutionize the future of humankind in space: a Space Elevator, 36,000 kilometers high, anchored to an equatorial island in the Indian Ocean.

"An amazing list – genuinely the best novels from sixty years of SF." - Iain

Overview

In the 22nd century visionary scientist Vannevar Morgan conceives the most grandiose engineering project of all time, and one which will revolutionize the future of humankind in space: a Space Elevator, 36,000 kilometers high, anchored to an equatorial island in the Indian Ocean.

"An amazing list – genuinely the best novels from sixty years of SF." - Iain M. Banks
"Delightfully written and at times almost unbearably exciting." - Kingsley Amis
"His enthusiasm is combined with his considerable literary and myth-making skills ... the result is something special." - Sunday Telegraph
"A superbly crafted novel that may be his best." - Tribune

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Published in 1953, 1952, and 1979, respectively, this trio of novels follow Clarke's recurring theme of humans thrusting themselves into space and then not necessarily liking what they find. The religious images that run throughout Clarke's work also are present here. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781455857685
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
11/22/2011
Edition description:
Unabridged, 7 CDs, 8 hrs. 31 min.
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 5.40(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Arthur C. Clarke was considered to be the greatest science fiction writer of all time. He was an international treasure in many other ways: an article he wrote in 1945 led to the invention of satellite technology. Books by Mr. Clarke - both fiction and nonfiction - have more than one hundred million copies in print worldwide. He died in 2008 at the age of 90.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1917
Date of Death:
March 19, 2008
Place of Birth:
Minehead, Somerset, England
Place of Death:
Sri Lanka
Education:
1948, King's College, London, first-class honors in Physics and Mathematics

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Fountains of Paradise 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Is there such a thing as dumbing down our authors? I really liked this book despite the extremely slow start. Clarke spends a lot of time setting up the story before getting to it. After describing this paradise converted to tower basement's foundation, Clarke dispenses some lessons on physics, chemistry and relativity similar to the way asimov does in his titles. I like my sci fi to have an aire of mystery to it. This fits the bill when something goes amiss with the tower to the gods. Nevertheless clarke's hero comes through but I'll leave the details for you to find out.
cheebert More than 1 year ago
Like 2001, Fountains of Paradise is the near future imagined. It isn't far fetched and as an engineer I can see us knocking down the obstacles to this becoming real. I believe in Clarke's vision enough that I've quoted this book in my textbooks as to what cloud computing could be as early as next year. It's not really fiction, just a slightly colored view of our near future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
...you have a serious interest in space elevators. To my knowledge, this is the only novel to significantly incorporate the idea. That said, the story itself was a bit flat.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The most frustrating thing about reading Arthur C. Clarke is that he sacrifices everything for the Big Idea. Clarke's had plenty of Big Ideas in his distinguished career (he is generally credited with the idea for the geosynchronous satellite, for example), but they don't always make for good reading. The Fountains of Paradise (about one man's quest to build the world's first space elevator) is typical Clarke: It reads like an engineering thesis that has been randomly sprinkled with throwaway characters and plot devices. Clarke's vision of the 22nd Century is typical for his work: One day the entire human race woke up and decided to do away with all poverty, war, conflict and religion (the lone exception being a small group of Buddhist monks who stand opposed to the elevator being constructed on their holy site until, for no clear reason, they change their minds and give up, never to be seen again). This book did win the Hugo and Nebula awards, I believe, but I couldn't tell you why. For hard science readers, this will prove interesting, but for those looking for a compelling read, look elsewhere.