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The Four Feathers
     

The Four Feathers

3.8 35
by A. E. W. Mason
 

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Written by A. E. W. Mason, “The Four Feathers” is a riveting tale of redemption woven in the complex interrelationships between love, friendships, trust, and courage. Harry Feversham, a young man who finds himself born into a historic family of proud British military men, wants nothing more than to be free of such a heritage. Whereas his forefathers

Overview

Written by A. E. W. Mason, “The Four Feathers” is a riveting tale of redemption woven in the complex interrelationships between love, friendships, trust, and courage. Harry Feversham, a young man who finds himself born into a historic family of proud British military men, wants nothing more than to be free of such a heritage. Whereas his forefathers fought and died with great courage, Harry is petrified of risking his life for his country and mentally labels himself a coward. Nevertheless, he has little choice but to follow in his father's footsteps. When Harry's regiment is finally summoned to go to war in the Sudan, Harry's fear of his own cowardice overcomes his fear of his father, and he accordingly resigns his commission. Once three of Harry's closest companions uncover the reason for his decision to resign, they decide to each send him a single white feather to signify his cowardice. What ensues is a story of Harry's heroic attempts at redemption, not only from his friends and from his father, but also from the girl of Harry's dreams, who, being present at the time Harry receives the feathers, adds her own to the original three. Throughout the exciting events and plot twists of The Four Feathers, Mason presents to readers a reality of human emotions and impulses which cannot draw comparison. As one of the masterpieces of 20th century literature, Mason’s novel is highly recommended.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013005624
Publisher:
Cherry Lane Ebooks
Publication date:
09/04/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
389 KB

Meet the Author

Alfred Edward Woodley Mason (1865-1948) was a British author and politician. He is best remembered for his 1902 novel The Four Feathers. He studied at Dulwich College and graduated from Trinity College, Oxford in 1888. He was a contemporary of fellow Liberal Anthony Hope, who went on to write the adventure novel The Prisoner of Zenda. His first novel, A Romance of Wastdale, was published in 1895. He was the author of more than 20 books, including At The Villa Rose, a mystery novel in which he introduced his French detective, Inspector Hanaud. His best-known book is The Four Feathers, which has been made into several films. Many consider it his masterpiece. Other books are The House of the Arrow, No Other Tiger, The Prisoner in the Opal and Fire Over England. He contributed a short story, The Conjurer, to The Queen's Book of the Red Cross. Mason was elected as a Liberal Member of Parliament for Coventry in the 1906 general election. He served only a single term in Parliament, retiring at the next general election in January 1910. Mason wrote three plays that were produced and presented by Sir George Alexamder in St James's Theatre. He wrote, "I had three plays produced by George Alexander; one a failure, Colonel Smith, one which made a moderate profit, Open Windows, and one which was a considerable success, The Witness for the Defence. Mason served with the Manchester Regiment in the First World War, being promoted Captain in 1914. He transferred to the General List in 1915 and the Royal Marine Light Infantry in 1917 with the rank of Major. His military career included work in naval intelligence, serving in Spain and Mexico, where he set up counter-espionage networks on behalf of the British government. He died in 1948 while working on a non-fiction book about Admiral Robert Blake.

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The Four Feathers 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Set in Colonial Africa, this fast-paced novel is filled with an exciting plot, including a heart-stopping prison escape. A. E. W. Mason cleverly intertwines the themes of perserverance and self-confidence throughout the book. I read this in 8th grade and throughly enjoyed reading it. I would recommend this to any fan of the 'Classics', especially boys.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Larry D. Bohall, author of Martyr's Cry (ISBN 1591295327): A.E.W. Mason's The Four Feathers is a romance in every meaning of the word. Certainly a romance between Harry and Ethne (the main characters), but it's also filled with the romance of adventure, of loyalty, of honor. It is a period piece, and 21st century readers might have trouble with some of it. But if one can set that aside, and read the novel for the story, you'll have a rousing great time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked it. Not the best of the best but not bad either. There could be some edits l'm sure. It was good but not overly great so far. Same for the next chapter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too much talking and too many footnotes.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Harry Feversham, son of a British general during the Crimean War, is haunted by both his family’s remarkable history of service in the British army and the stories of cowardice that he had heard told as a boy during his father’s annual “Crimea Nights” reunions. Due to his fear of becoming a coward and staining his ancestors’ reputation, Harry resigns his commission in the East Surrey Regiment just prior to Sir Garnet Wolseley's 1882 expedition to Egypt to suppress the rising of Urabi Pasha. Yet three of his comrades, Captain Trench and Lieutenants Castleton and Willoughby, send him three white feathers to express their disapproval of his act, and his Irish fiancée, Ethne Eustace, presents him with a fourth feather and breaks their engagement. Harry’s best friend in the regiment, Captain Durrance becomes his rival for Ethne. After talking with Lieutenant Sutch, a friend of his father, Harry decides to redeem himself by acts that will force his former friends to take back the feathers and might in turn encourage Ethne to take back her feather. Thus, he travels on his own to Egypt and Sudan. Meanwhile, Durrance is blinded by sunstroke and is sent home. Over the next six years, Castleton is killed at Tamai, but Willoughby is now a commander and Harry, with the aid of a Sudanese Arab Abou Fatma, succeeds in recovering some lost letters and getting them to Willoughby. Then he learns that Trench is imprisoned in the “House of Stone” at Omdurman and allows himself to be captured in an attempt to rescue him. Meanwhile, Durrance and Ethne become engaged, though each secretly realizes that there are problems in their relationship. Will Harry and Trench escape? Does Ethne take back her feather? Can Durrance find a cure for his blindness? And who will marry whom? This book was recommended to me by my friend Thaxter Dickey, a professor at Florida College. Alfred Edward Woodley Mason (1865-1948) was a British politician and author, of whom it is said that he delighted readers with adventure novels and detective stories written in a style reminiscent of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Arthur Conan Doyle. I would add that this book reminds me of H. Rider Haggard, author of King Solomon’s Mines and She. Mason wrote more than twenty books but is best known for The Four Feathers. There is very little objectionable in the story. A few minor references to smoking tobacco, drinking alcoholic beverages, and dancing occur, and the name of God, as in “Good God,” “My God,” and “O God,” is used as an interjection. However, the facts that people prayed, trusted in God, and looked to His providence are also mentioned. And the idea of honor is quite strong. The plot may move a little too slowly and be a bit too complex for young children, but teens as young as thirteen and adults who like exotic adventure stories should enjoy it. I know that I did.
mtownsend More than 1 year ago
if you enjoy the great game and great fictional history this is the book for you.
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MulgaBill More than 1 year ago
Excellent book! Highly recommended.
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