The Four Feathers [NOOK Book]

The Four Feathers

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013465763
  • Publisher: Puget Empire Publishing, LP
  • Publication date: 12/2/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 573 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 32 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2007

    A reviewer

    Set in Colonial Africa, this fast-paced novel is filled with an exciting plot, including a heart-stopping prison escape. A. E. W. Mason cleverly intertwines the themes of perserverance and self-confidence throughout the book. I read this in 8th grade and throughly enjoyed reading it. I would recommend this to any fan of the 'Classics', especially boys.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2004

    Yahooo!

    This is a great book for adventure, classic literature, and romance lovers. No wonder I liked it :-) The way the hero lives to regain his lost honor for the sake of his (ex)fiance is truly touching. Another character that I really admired was Feversham's freind, Jack Durrance, who shows just as much strength of character. When I finished it I was just like 'Sniff, that's so great!' And, uh...yes, being a fourteen year old girl I did see the movie with Heath Ledger. Don't miss it either, friends!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2003

    A REAL Romance

    Larry D. Bohall, author of Martyr's Cry (ISBN 1591295327): A.E.W. Mason's The Four Feathers is a romance in every meaning of the word. Certainly a romance between Harry and Ethne (the main characters), but it's also filled with the romance of adventure, of loyalty, of honor. It is a period piece, and 21st century readers might have trouble with some of it. But if one can set that aside, and read the novel for the story, you'll have a rousing great time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    Taylor's review....

    I liked it. Not the best of the best but not bad either. There could be some edits l'm sure. It was good but not overly great so far. Same for the next chapter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2014

    The House-

    "Clarity!" Her mom called, from the empty house. "Clarity are you ready to go? Make sure you have all your bags packed." Clarity looked around her room, going back around to make sure she didn't forget anything." "YES MOM!" Clarity yelled back letting her mom know she had everything packed. "Why do we have to move? I mean why can't we stay here in Sunny California instead of moving to Chilly Alaska. Whats sooo great about Alaska? Nothing! Its cold!" Clarity rubbed her face, hoisting her backpack up onto her shoulder shutting her door behind her. "Bye house"
    <p>
    Now I don't enjoy long car rides at all but mom made me bring a notebook pencil and my iPod to keep busy. Yeah sure if only my iPod could stay charged for twenty plus hours I'd be fine with it but noooooo. Sorry I should stop complaining as most of you know I'm Clarity James, born and raised in California until now, I'm a Freshmen in High-School and my wonderful parents decided to take me from all my friends to some other state. Lets just say I wasn't the happiest girl plus being on your period doesn't help either. Yes TMI but oh well.
    <p>
    I keep looking out the window sighing watching raindrops fall down the window. I tapped away on my iPod leaning my head against the window I got a text from Emilia my best friend.
    <p>
    Sup Brat?
    <br>
    Nothing Much Bored.
    <br>
    Oh that sux.
    <br>
    Ditto. Gtg we're at Mickey D's
    <p>
    We walked into McDonalds and got our food then sat down. I picked around at my food but never ate it I did take small sips of my Coke.
    <p>
    TBC IN NEXT RESULT

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2013

    Another boring one.

    Too much talking and too many footnotes.

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  • Posted April 29, 2012

    Harry Feversham, son of a British general during the Crimean War

    Harry Feversham, son of a British general during the Crimean War, is haunted by both his family&rsquo;s remarkable history of service in the British army and the stories of cowardice that he had heard told as a boy during his father&rsquo;s annual &ldquo;Crimea Nights&rdquo; reunions. Due to his fear of becoming a coward and staining his ancestors&rsquo; reputation, Harry resigns his commission in the East Surrey Regiment just prior to Sir Garnet Wolseley's 1882 expedition to Egypt to suppress the rising of Urabi Pasha. Yet three of his comrades, Captain Trench and Lieutenants Castleton and Willoughby, send him three white feathers to express their disapproval of his act, and his Irish fianc&eacute;e, Ethne Eustace, presents him with a fourth feather and breaks their engagement. Harry&rsquo;s best friend in the regiment, Captain Durrance becomes his rival for Ethne.
    After talking with Lieutenant Sutch, a friend of his father, Harry decides to redeem himself by acts that will force his former friends to take back the feathers and might in turn encourage Ethne to take back her feather. Thus, he travels on his own to Egypt and Sudan. Meanwhile, Durrance is blinded by sunstroke and is sent home. Over the next six years, Castleton is killed at Tamai, but Willoughby is now a commander and Harry, with the aid of a Sudanese Arab Abou Fatma, succeeds in recovering some lost letters and getting them to Willoughby. Then he learns that Trench is imprisoned in the &ldquo;House of Stone&rdquo; at Omdurman and allows himself to be captured in an attempt to rescue him. Meanwhile, Durrance and Ethne become engaged, though each secretly realizes that there are problems in their relationship. Will Harry and Trench escape? Does Ethne take back her feather? Can Durrance find a cure for his blindness? And who will marry whom?
    This book was recommended to me by my friend Thaxter Dickey, a professor at Florida College. Alfred Edward Woodley Mason (1865-1948) was a British politician and author, of whom it is said that he delighted readers with adventure novels and detective stories written in a style reminiscent of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Arthur Conan Doyle. I would add that this book reminds me of H. Rider Haggard, author of King Solomon&rsquo;s Mines and She. Mason wrote more than twenty books but is best known for The Four Feathers. There is very little objectionable in the story. A few minor references to smoking tobacco, drinking alcoholic beverages, and dancing occur, and the name of God, as in &ldquo;Good God,&rdquo; &ldquo;My God,&rdquo; and &ldquo;O God,&rdquo; is used as an interjection. However, the facts that people prayed, trusted in God, and looked to His providence are also mentioned. And the idea of honor is quite strong. The plot may move a little too slowly and be a bit too complex for young children, but teens as young as thirteen and adults who like exotic adventure stories should enjoy it. I know that I did.

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  • Posted April 10, 2012

    good book

    if you enjoy the great game and great fictional history this is the book for you.

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  • Posted July 19, 2011

    Great Read!

    Excellent book! Highly recommended.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Misleading

    Well, the summary on the back of the book makes it sound like an engaging tale of adventure. However, what we are not told is that all of the adventures are related by people thousands of miles away. Only within the last one-hundred pages or so does some adventure become a first hand account. There are some interesting points, but missing this book would not be a tragedy.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    "welcome back Muriel Graham's son with his honour redeemed and his great fault atoned"

    Harry Feversham was born June 15, 1855 in Broad Place, his ancestral home in Surrey, England. His Scottish mother Muriel nee Graham gave birth while on the same day in the Crimea his father was assaulting a Russian "Redan" or fortification before Sebastopol. It took 100,000 French and British lives to capture that fort.

    A. E. W. Mason's 1902 novel THE FOUR FEATHERS covers nearly thirty years in the life of Harry Feversham. We meet him in 1869, on the 14th anniversary of the attack on the Redan by Harry's father, now, in retirement, an Army general, like generations of Fevershams before him. For the first time young Harry, home from school, is invited to take part in this annual meeting of the thinning ranks of Crimean War veterans. General Feversham says this about Harry to his first guest to arrive, navy lieutenant Sutch: "He will, of course, enter the service, and he might learn something, perhaps, which afterwards will be of use -- one never knows." ***

    Sutch had known and admired Harry's now dead mother perhaps even longer than had Harry's father. When he meets her son, Lt. Sutch recognizes Muriel Graham: imagination, refinement of intellect, beauty of person. Absent in young Harry are his father's "personal courage and an indomitable self-confidence." Crippled in the attack on the Redan, Sutch had ever since made himself a thorough scholar of human nature. Sutch soon grasped that Harry's imagination made him powerfully forsee a military career in which fear would be his constant companion and cowardice in the face of the enemy a real likelihood. ***

    We next meet 27-year old Harry Feversham in London in 1882. With others of his India-based regiment he is on a long vacation. He has just become engaged to marry an enchanting 21-year old Irishwoman of County Donegal, Ethne Eustace. Attending a party in Harry's tenth storey London flat are three army friends, including his closest, Jack Durrance. They had been together at Oxford, had competed together in rowing. And both had loved Ethne Eustace. A mysterious telegram arrived during the party, from an absent regimental companion who was dining with a a high ranking person in the Foreign Office. That telegram, and especially, its timing, once it was pieced together, caused the three regimental companions to send Harry three feathers, accusing him of cowardice. ***

    Harry opens their package at Ethne's home and in her presence. She too over hastily concludes that her fiance is a coward. She breaks off the engagement. On the spot, however, Harry conceives a plan of redemption. A few days later he reveals it to Lt. Sutch: Harry will go to Sudan, where his old regiment has been deployed, and do such deeds of bravery as will compel his onetime friends to take back their feathers and carry them to Ethne in Ireland, where, Harry hopes, she too will take back the fourth feather she gave her lover. Lt. Sutch from then on lives only to "welcome back Muriel Graham's son with his honour redeemed and his great fault atoned" ***

    Six years later the story reaches its conclusion. This is not a story so much of external action as of internal growth, of sorrow for pain inflicted on others, on self-imposed labors, not far below the 12 of Hercules, to prove one's courage, redeem honor and to rekindle a lost love. As a novel of interior growth, THE FOUR FEATHERS has to rank as one of the great achievements of English literature. -OOO-

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2008

    A Great Read

    This book is outstanding. I could not put it down. The magnificent plot, interesting characters and dramatic scenes all add up to definite classic.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2008

    Fair

    Well written, poor storyline. Very interesting in some parts, though.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2006

    i cried from the middle on

    what a great story about friendship! After I saw the movie I went out and bought the book! It is a wonderful book as well! Highly recommended!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2005

    smashing

    great story in the tradition of stevenson. shows the better nature of men, if only in fiction. In the tried and true tradition of courage and honor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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