The Four Feathers

The Four Feathers

3.8 35
by A. E. W. Mason
     
 

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The Four Feather was written by A. E. W. Mason and published in 1902. English officer and gentleman Harry Feversham has wealth, social position, a beautiful fiancée, Ethne Eustace, and a brotherly bond with three close friends. But he also harbors a dark secret. Though he is expected to continue his family’s proud tradition of military service, he cannot

Overview

The Four Feather was written by A. E. W. Mason and published in 1902. English officer and gentleman Harry Feversham has wealth, social position, a beautiful fiancée, Ethne Eustace, and a brotherly bond with three close friends. But he also harbors a dark secret. Though he is expected to continue his family’s proud tradition of military service, he cannot forget the shameful stories he heard as a child: tales of men who shirked their duty and disgraced themselves in battle. Fearing he too will flee from combat, Harry resigns his commission when his regiment is ordered to the war-torn Sudan. Following this decision, he receives a white feather—symbolizing cowardice—from each of his friends, and a fourth from Ethne. To redeem himself in their eyes, and his own, he embarks on an epic quest, traveling alone to Africa disguised as an Arab. As Harry endures desert heat, raging enemies, and the hellish prison known as the House of Stone, his heroic exploits become the stuff of legend. Originally published in 1902, The Four Feathers, A. E. W. Mason’s best-known novel of adventure and romance, explores a plethora of complex moral issues within a framework of exotic intrigue and breakneck action. What is courage? What is cowardice? What is loyalty? And how do we balance the conflicting demands of country, family, friends, lovers, and one’s own ideals?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612981406
Publisher:
United Holdings Group
Publication date:
01/08/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
450 KB

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The Four Feathers 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Set in Colonial Africa, this fast-paced novel is filled with an exciting plot, including a heart-stopping prison escape. A. E. W. Mason cleverly intertwines the themes of perserverance and self-confidence throughout the book. I read this in 8th grade and throughly enjoyed reading it. I would recommend this to any fan of the 'Classics', especially boys.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Larry D. Bohall, author of Martyr's Cry (ISBN 1591295327): A.E.W. Mason's The Four Feathers is a romance in every meaning of the word. Certainly a romance between Harry and Ethne (the main characters), but it's also filled with the romance of adventure, of loyalty, of honor. It is a period piece, and 21st century readers might have trouble with some of it. But if one can set that aside, and read the novel for the story, you'll have a rousing great time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked it. Not the best of the best but not bad either. There could be some edits l'm sure. It was good but not overly great so far. Same for the next chapter.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too much talking and too many footnotes.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Harry Feversham, son of a British general during the Crimean War, is haunted by both his family’s remarkable history of service in the British army and the stories of cowardice that he had heard told as a boy during his father’s annual “Crimea Nights” reunions. Due to his fear of becoming a coward and staining his ancestors’ reputation, Harry resigns his commission in the East Surrey Regiment just prior to Sir Garnet Wolseley's 1882 expedition to Egypt to suppress the rising of Urabi Pasha. Yet three of his comrades, Captain Trench and Lieutenants Castleton and Willoughby, send him three white feathers to express their disapproval of his act, and his Irish fiancée, Ethne Eustace, presents him with a fourth feather and breaks their engagement. Harry’s best friend in the regiment, Captain Durrance becomes his rival for Ethne. After talking with Lieutenant Sutch, a friend of his father, Harry decides to redeem himself by acts that will force his former friends to take back the feathers and might in turn encourage Ethne to take back her feather. Thus, he travels on his own to Egypt and Sudan. Meanwhile, Durrance is blinded by sunstroke and is sent home. Over the next six years, Castleton is killed at Tamai, but Willoughby is now a commander and Harry, with the aid of a Sudanese Arab Abou Fatma, succeeds in recovering some lost letters and getting them to Willoughby. Then he learns that Trench is imprisoned in the “House of Stone” at Omdurman and allows himself to be captured in an attempt to rescue him. Meanwhile, Durrance and Ethne become engaged, though each secretly realizes that there are problems in their relationship. Will Harry and Trench escape? Does Ethne take back her feather? Can Durrance find a cure for his blindness? And who will marry whom? This book was recommended to me by my friend Thaxter Dickey, a professor at Florida College. Alfred Edward Woodley Mason (1865-1948) was a British politician and author, of whom it is said that he delighted readers with adventure novels and detective stories written in a style reminiscent of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Arthur Conan Doyle. I would add that this book reminds me of H. Rider Haggard, author of King Solomon’s Mines and She. Mason wrote more than twenty books but is best known for The Four Feathers. There is very little objectionable in the story. A few minor references to smoking tobacco, drinking alcoholic beverages, and dancing occur, and the name of God, as in “Good God,” “My God,” and “O God,” is used as an interjection. However, the facts that people prayed, trusted in God, and looked to His providence are also mentioned. And the idea of honor is quite strong. The plot may move a little too slowly and be a bit too complex for young children, but teens as young as thirteen and adults who like exotic adventure stories should enjoy it. I know that I did.
mtownsend More than 1 year ago
if you enjoy the great game and great fictional history this is the book for you.
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MulgaBill More than 1 year ago
Excellent book! Highly recommended.
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