Four Secrets to Liking Your Work: You May Not Need to Quit to Get the Job You Want [NOOK Book]

Overview

Stop dreading Monday morning! Wherever you work, whatever you do, you can make your work life more fulfilling, more joyful...and it starts right here, right now, with this book. You’re holding the first practical, start-to-finish program for transforming your work life: all the tools, tricks, ideas, examples, and proven research you need to make it happen!

Dive in, and discover how to improve all your interactions with colleagues…what really motivates you, and why...how to find ...

See more details below
Four Secrets to Liking Your Work: You May Not Need to Quit to Get the Job You Want

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.49
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$19.99 List Price

Overview

Stop dreading Monday morning! Wherever you work, whatever you do, you can make your work life more fulfilling, more joyful...and it starts right here, right now, with this book. You’re holding the first practical, start-to-finish program for transforming your work life: all the tools, tricks, ideas, examples, and proven research you need to make it happen!

Dive in, and discover how to improve all your interactions with colleagues…what really motivates you, and why...how to find the positive feedback and work experiences you desperately need...what you can learn today to become happier and more effective in your current job...when to quit, and how to find the work you’re meant to do. One day, one small step at a time, start building the work life you’ve always dreamt about...passionate, fun, and enormously successful!

likeworkagain.com

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132703864
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 1/29/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,218,102
  • File size: 1,009 KB

Meet the Author

Edward G. Muzio is President and CEO of Group Harmonics and a leader in the application of analytical models to enhance group effectiveness. He has started large organizations and small companies, led global initiatives in technology development and employee recruitment, and published papers ranging from manufacturing strategy to individual skills and productivity. As primary developer of his company’s educational suite, he serves as advisor and educator to workers at all levels in companies worldwide.

Deborah J. Fisher, PhD is a Visiting Research Professor at the University of New Mexico. Dedicated to group productivity and human motivation, her career has included tenure and an endowed chair position at her current institution, and Directorship of the Engineering Management Program at the University of Houston. She has automated organizational learning for the construction industry, created employee development models for Sandia National Laboratories, and educated generations of professionals along the way.

Erv Thomas, PEis a Program Manager at Intel Corporation. For the past several years he has been responsible for recruiting, mentoring, and developing the top engineering talent in the world. He has dedicated over 30,000 hours of his time to helping professionals and young adults live up to their full potential at work and in life. Additionally, he has been a design engineer, an educator, and the founding director of a non-profit organization where he has spent the majority of his “non-working” time mentoring teens at risk.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

ProloguePrologueMonday Morning Dread

The alarm broke the peaceful silence of the bedroom with an ugly metallic buzz, the dial glowing sallow green numerals of an obscene hour. Brian rubbed his eyes; consciousness came slowly. Soon, that old feeling of "work dread" began to smother his spirit. The day ahead of him drifted into focus, and his all too familiar feeling of dismay was close behind: It's time to go to work.

Like many, Brian lost his "will to work" years ago. The thought of a whole week at "that place" made him want to go back to sleep or to vanish and never return. The conflict, the oppression, the sadness, and the boredom were unbearable. Yet he could find no alternative. Bills needed to be paid, and he had become fond of eating.

Old habits die hard. Brian had dreaded his job for so long, it was the first thing he thought of as he awoke. But then he remembered something else. Six months ago, he had been given a book, one that claimed he could like his job again. It explained different ways of looking at work, through filters or lenses that could help to identify some of the dread and replace it with action. "One kind of Genius," the authors claimed, "is the ability to see the same situation from multiple perspectives."1 Changed understanding can produce changed action; changed action produces changed results. He was utterly skeptical, but he had no better option. He read his new book and waited for failure.

To his surprise, it helped. It wasn't long before he felt a small shift. This made him just a little less skeptical. The more he used the book, the better it worked. His job became first more tolerable, then more enjoyable. When he had started reading, he had been intent upon quitting his job as soon as possible. Now, he wasn't sure. Maybe it wasn't so bad if he approached it the right way. This was a novel thought for Brian.

As he awakened that Monday morning, Brian felt the familiar dread and then remembered his new strategy. "What am I dreading," he wondered? He recalled that often it is a single, fixable problem that overshadows everything else. Several difficult things were going to happen that day, but which one was causing the dread? One by one, he tried the different perspectives taught by the book, isolating each possible source of his pain.

He found it. He would have to work with a particularly troublesome person that afternoon, someone he would otherwise avoid. In his mind's eye, he looked again at that interaction with his new perspective. He considered what would probably happen and planned his responses accordingly. He knew things wouldn't be perfect, but he decided he could at least make a slight improvement.

He checked, and his feeling of dread had vanished.

Welcome to Brian's book.

Why Do We Work?

Besides the obvious answer, "to survive," there are deeper, more meaningful reasons to work. The idea of applying our energy to create a positive result is fundamental to both our culture and our belief systems.

The ideal of "the value of hard work" is culturally pervasive, from the children's story of "The Little Engine That Could"2 to the iconic account of a person of modest background who works hard and "makes good." One need not be from the United States. Otherwise privileged students at the People's University of China, for example, work in service-oriented jobs for educational credit. Why? To learn the value of working hard and efficiently, a value espoused by Chinese President Hu Jintao.3

This value runs deeper, to our spiritual beliefs. A large number of creation accounts have existed, from ancient times to present, describing a creator working to construct the world as we know it.4 From the Japanese account of gods Izanagi and Izanami5 fashioning the world from chaos, to the Iroquois (Native American) account of animal spirits creating terra firma with mud from the bottom of the sea,6 to the Judeo-Christian account of God creating the world in six days and stating "it is good7," faith traditions abound that discreetly reinforce the link between work and positive outcome at the highest level.

Work at Its Best

Whether it is a spiritual account of a creator at work in the heavens, an iconic literary figure turning gumption to payoff, or an employee spending energy to produce a result and receive a paycheck, work is the application of effort to add value to the world. We have no shortage of problems; opportunities abound for us to contribute however we can. Through work, we become "part of the solution" rather than "part of the problem." Whether you are working on the cure for cancer, grilling burgers for hungry customers, or laboring at home to raise your children, you are contributing positive results to the world.

Work validates our own sense of value and contribution and gives us a sense of identity. For many, work is where we spend most of our time; it becomes the backdrop against which we define ourselves—so much so, in fact, that many of us don't want to leave. There are more than 4.5 million members of the workforce today who retired and then began working again because they "wanted to." This group's motivation was not financial; instead, they listed reasons such as health, energy, and fun for returning to the workplace.8 Work adds value to us even as we add value to the world.

As we grow and develop in the context of work, it forces us to look inward and understand who we really are: our gifts, talents, weaknesses, and passions. Work can support us at multiple levels of development, from building physiological safety and security to learning self-esteem. Over the years, it becomes the canvas on which we self-actualize.9 So many of us have individual accounts of how we learned and grew individually from experiences at work.

At its best, work can help us learn patience, understanding, humility, empathy, constructive confrontation, honesty, and integrity. The lessons and skills that make us more effective at work can also make us more effective in life. Ideally our work should bring us joy.

Work at Its Worst

The reality is often the opposite. Work can produce negative results. It can be used to cheat, to lie and to hurt other people. Much "work" was done within World War II and the holocaust, for example. Work can tear down others, even those we love. It can hinder the progress of others simply to make someone look better, and working energy can be spent to cover up wrongdoing. We can even work hard at pretending to work!

Work can build us up, but it can also tear us down. It can involve long hours over an extended period and physical and emotional stress. Many of us have experienced negative workplaces that demean employees, either accidentally or intentionally. This has a tremendous impact on self-esteem, productivity, and morale. Many people come to feel devalued, insecure, and discouraged because of the environment in which they work. They get no feeling of pride, accomplishment, or value from working.

Some of this is not directly in our control; we can't "stop" an environment from being difficult. On the other hand, downtrodden employees often have more capability, resources, and options at hand than they realize. We cannot choose the actions of others, but we are always free to choose how we interpret and process them. In those choices lie chances to grow.

What Work Offers

You might simply feel as if you have to work to survive, and all you want to do is experience less dread and misery. If so, this book can help you achieve that goal. If you've been suffering for a long time, "less dread" in itself may seem to be an ideal or unreachable goal.

We hope that you will consider another goal for work. Work teaches us much about ourselves. Some of the most useful pieces of information are the reasons behind our satisfaction or misery. Viewed carefully, those reasons act like mirrors, showing us hidden facets of our strengths and preferences. How carefully we gather that knowledge and what we do with it is entirely up to us. This book isn't only about "suffering less." It's also about "learning more"—that is, learning more about ourselves, more about those around us, and more about how to find or create the environment we need to thrive. We can build on our knowledge and let it direct our paths into the future.

There is, of course, a risk. With knowledge of our strengths comes knowledge of our weaknesses. As we learn, we must use the knowledge we gather for ourselves, not against ourselves. Rather than being proud of our abilities, it is easy to become depressed about what we lack. But if we focus on our weaknesses and ignore our strengths, our greatest gifts lie dormant and undeveloped, and we become weaker still.10 The goal—of this book and at work—is not to harp on weaknesses, but to find a way to play to our strengths as often as possible.11

How Far Could You Go if You Loved Your Job?

Imagine a work life so compelling that winning the lottery would change your bank account balance but not your daily routine.

How would this type of joy and balance affect your life? How far could you go? How much money could you make? How much could you learn? How well could you support your loved ones? What could you contribute to the world? What could you contribute to yourself?

Imagine living and working like this for 10 years. How about 20, 30, 40 years? Now imagine looking back on all of this productive, joyful work. What will you have accomplished?

This book is not a stop-whining-fast program inflicted on you by someone else. It is about you doing what you can to make your work life better. Imagine for a minute that you looked forward to Monday morning. Imagine work that was fun, engaging, and felt more like recreation and less like...well, work! Imagine thinking, "I can't believe I get paid for this."

It's hard to believe that a conscientious worker would not also be a successful one in such a situation.12 It might sound like a naïve and impossible goal if you're in the majority, dissatisfied with your job and feeling trapped, but it is possible to achieve this kind of satisfaction. And like any object of pursuit, your odds of success increase tremendously when you understand what "it" is and what "it" looks like.

So let's begin...

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xvii

About the Authors xviii

Prologue: Monday Morning Dread xix

Chapter 1: The Trouble with Work 1

Chapter 2: How People Act 17

Chapter 3: Watching the Action 33

Chapter 4: Why People Act 45

Chapter 5: Figuring Out Why 65

Chapter 6: What People Do 77

Chapter 7: Do What You Like 91

Chapter 8: Got Skills? 105

Chapter 9: A Bird’s Eye View 123

Appendix 139

Notes 141

Index 147

Read More Show Less

Preface

Prologue

Monday Morning Dread

The alarm broke the peaceful silence of the bedroom with an ugly metallic buzz, the dial glowing sallow green numerals of an obscene hour. Brian rubbed his eyes; consciousness came slowly. Soon, that old feeling of "work dread" began to smother his spirit. The day ahead of him drifted into focus, and his all too familiar feeling of dismay was close behind: It's time to go to work.

Like many, Brian lost his "will to work" years ago. The thought of a whole week at "that place" made him want to go back to sleep or to vanish and never return. The conflict, the oppression, the sadness, and the boredom were unbearable. Yet he could find no alternative. Bills needed to be paid, and he had become fond of eating.

Old habits die hard. Brian had dreaded his job for so long, it was the first thing he thought of as he awoke. But then he remembered something else. Six months ago, he had been given a book, one that claimed he could like his job again. It explained different ways of looking at work, through filters or lenses that could help to identify some of the dread and replace it with action. "One kind of Genius," the authors claimed, "is the ability to see the same situation from multiple perspectives."1 Changed understanding can produce changed action; changed action produces changed results. He was utterly skeptical, but he had no better option. He read his new book and waited for failure.

To his surprise, it helped. It wasn't long before he felt a small shift. This made him just a little less skeptical. The more he used the book, the better it worked. His job became first more tolerable, then more enjoyable. When he had started reading, he had been intent upon quitting his job as soon as possible. Now, he wasn't sure. Maybe it wasn't so bad if he approached it the right way. This was a novel thought for Brian.

As he awakened that Monday morning, Brian felt the familiar dread and then remembered his new strategy. "What am I dreading," he wondered? He recalled that often it is a single, fixable problem that overshadows everything else. Several difficult things were going to happen that day, but which one was causing the dread? One by one, he tried the different perspectives taught by the book, isolating each possible source of his pain.

He found it. He would have to work with a particularly troublesome person that afternoon, someone he would otherwise avoid. In his mind's eye, he looked again at that interaction with his new perspective. He considered what would probably happen and planned his responses accordingly. He knew things wouldn't be perfect, but he decided he could at least make a slight improvement.

He checked, and his feeling of dread had vanished.

Welcome to Brian's book.

Why Do We Work?

Besides the obvious answer, "to survive," there are deeper, more meaningful reasons to work. The idea of applying our energy to create a positive result is fundamental to both our culture and our belief systems.

The ideal of "the value of hard work" is culturally pervasive, from the children's story of "The Little Engine That Could"2 to the iconic account of a person of modest background who works hard and "makes good." One need not be from the United States. Otherwise privileged students at the People's University of China, for example, work in service-oriented jobs for educational credit. Why? To learn the value of working hard and efficiently, a value espoused by Chinese President Hu Jintao.3

This value runs deeper, to our spiritual beliefs. A large number of creation accounts have existed, from ancient times to present, describing a creator working to construct the world as we know it.4 From the Japanese account of gods Izanagi and Izanami5 fashioning the world from chaos, to the Iroquois (Native American) account of animal spirits creating terra firma with mud from the bottom of the sea,6 to the Judeo-Christian account of God creating the world in six days and stating "it is good7," faith traditions abound that discreetly reinforce the link between work and positive outcome at the highest level.

Work at Its Best

Whether it is a spiritual account of a creator at work in the heavens, an iconic literary figure turning gumption to payoff, or an employee spending energy to produce a result and receive a paycheck, work is the application of effort to add value to the world. We have no shortage of problems; opportunities abound for us to contribute however we can. Through work, we become "part of the solution" rather than "part of the problem." Whether you are working on the cure for cancer, grilling burgers for hungry customers, or laboring at home to raise your children, you are contributing positive results to the world.

Work validates our own sense of value and contribution and gives us a sense of identity. For many, work is where we spend most of our time; it becomes the backdrop against which we define ourselves—so much so, in fact, that many of us don't want to leave. There are more than 4.5 million members of the workforce today who retired and then began working again because they "wanted to." This group's motivation was not financial; instead, they listed reasons such as health, energy, and fun for returning to the workplace.8 Work adds value to us even as we add value to the world.

As we grow and develop in the context of work, it forces us to look inward and understand who we really are: our gifts, talents, weaknesses, and passions. Work can support us at multiple levels of development, from building physiological safety and security to learning self-esteem. Over the years, it becomes the canvas on which we self-actualize.9 So many of us have individual accounts of how we learned and grew individually from experiences at work.

At its best, work can help us learn patience, understanding, humility, empathy, constructive confrontation, honesty, and integrity. The lessons and skills that make us more effective at work can also make us more effective in life. Ideally our work should bring us joy.

Work at Its Worst

The reality is often the opposite. Work can produce negative results. It can be used to cheat, to lie and to hurt other people. Much "work" was done within World War II and the holocaust, for example. Work can tear down others, even those we love. It can hinder the progress of others simply to make someone look better, and working energy can be spent to cover up wrongdoing. We can even work hard at pretending to work!

Work can build us up, but it can also tear us down. It can involve long hours over an extended period and physical and emotional stress. Many of us have experienced negative workplaces that demean employees, either accidentally or intentionally. This has a tremendous impact on self-esteem, productivity, and morale. Many people come to feel devalued, insecure, and discouraged because of the environment in which they work. They get no feeling of pride, accomplishment, or value from working.

Some of this is not directly in our control; we can't "stop" an environment from being difficult. On the other hand, downtrodden employees often have more capability, resources, and options at hand than they realize. We cannot choose the actions of others, but we are always free to choose how we interpret and process them. In those choices lie chances to grow.

What Work Offers

You might simply feel as if you have to work to survive, and all you want to do is experience less dread and misery. If so, this book can help you achieve that goal. If you've been suffering for a long time, "less dread" in itself may seem to be an ideal or unreachable goal.

We hope that you will consider another goal for work. Work teaches us much about ourselves. Some of the most useful pieces of information are the reasons behind our satisfaction or misery. Viewed carefully, those reasons act like mirrors, showing us hidden facets of our strengths and preferences. How carefully we gather that knowledge and what we do with it is entirely up to us. This book isn't only about "suffering less." It's also about "learning more"—that is, learning more about ourselves, more about those around us, and more about how to find or create the environment we need to thrive. We can build on our knowledge and let it direct our paths into the future.

There is, of course, a risk. With knowledge of our strengths comes knowledge of our weaknesses. As we learn, we must use the knowledge we gather for ourselves, not against ourselves. Rather than being proud of our abilities, it is easy to become depressed about what we lack. But if we focus on our weaknesses and ignore our strengths, our greatest gifts lie dormant and undeveloped, and we become weaker still.10 The goal—of this book and at work—is not to harp on weaknesses, but to find a way to play to our strengths as often as possible.11

How Far Could You Go if You Loved Your Job?

Imagine a work life so compelling that winning the lottery would change your bank account balance but not your daily routine.

How would this type of joy and balance affect your life? How far could you go? How much money could you make? How much could you learn? How well could you support your loved ones? What could you contribute to the world? What could you contribute to yourself?

Imagine living and working like this for 10 years. How about 20, 30, 40 years? Now imagine looking back on all of this productive, joyful work. What will you have accomplished?

This book is not a stop-whining-fast program inflicted on you by someone else. It is about you doing what you can to make your work life better. Imagine for a minute that you looked forward to Monday morning. Imagine work that was fun, engaging, and felt more like recreation and less like...well, work! Imagine thinking, "I can't believe I get paid for this."

It's hard to believe that a conscientious worker would not also be a successful one in such a situation.12 It might sound like a naïve and impossible goal if you're in the majority, dissatisfied with your job and feeling trapped, but it is possible to achieve this kind of satisfaction. And like any object of pursuit, your odds of success increase tremendously when you understand what "it" is and what "it" looks like.

So let's begin...

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    A Great Resource for Coaches, Conselors & Consultants

    What a pleasure it is to write a review for a book authored by three people I know and admire. Each of the authors is a star in their own chosen work and they do a wonderful job of sharing the secrets they have gleaned in their own careers. As a Life Coach and Master Practitioner of NLP, I am particularly impressed with the ways that they relate the all important 'perceptual positions' to the way we are and work. Other coaches will immediately see the practical value of this book, from its thoroughly-researched content to its wholly relevant exercises and assignments--especially with clients who are struggling to find meaning and satisfaction in their work. Please don't overlook the value of objective assessment as a foundation for coaching excellence and accountability.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2008

    A reviewer

    I loved that the book gave useful suggestions that could be implemented right away. In addition to some great team exercises on the book's website, the book itself also provides exercises that you can do right away by yourself. I also enjoyed the balance that the book struck between helping your current situation and deciding if you need to start looking elsewhere - it actually lives up to its title.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    It couldn't have come at a better time

    This book gives valuable ways to handle being unhappy with your job. I've also been able to use some of the suggestions in other relationships. I highly recommend this book to anyone with a job, and also to those who have people reporting directly to them. Great book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)