Fourier Transform Spectrometry

Fourier Transform Spectrometry

by Sumner P. Davis, Mark C. Abrams, James W. Brault
     
 

Fourier transform spectrometry has evolved into an analytic spectroscopic method with applications throughout the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. As instruments have become automated and computerized, users have been able to focus on their experiments and not on the operation of their instruments. However, in many applications where source conditions

See more details below

Overview

Fourier transform spectrometry has evolved into an analytic spectroscopic method with applications throughout the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. As instruments have become automated and computerized, users have been able to focus on their experiments and not on the operation of their instruments. However, in many applications where source conditions are not ideal or the desired signal is weak, the success of an experiment can depend critically on understanding the instrument and the data-processing algorithms that extract the spectrum from the interferogram.

Fourier Transform Spectrometry provides essential background in Fourier analysis, systematically develops the fundamental concepts governing the design and operation of Fourier transform spectrometers, and illustrates every concept pictorially. Methods for transforming the interferogram and phase correcting the resulting spectrum are presented, with a focus on understanding the capabilities and limitations of the algorithms. Techniques of computerized spectrum analysis are discussed in a way that enables spectroscopists to understand the numerical processing algorithms without becoming computer programmers. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical algorithms are detailed and compared pictorially and quantitatively. Algorithms for line finding, fitting spectra to voigtian profiles, filtering, Fourier transforming, and spectrum synthesis are a basis for spectrum analysis tools from which complex signal processing procedures can be constructed.

This book is of immediate value to those who use Fourier transform spectrometers in their research or are considering their use. It gives the mathematical and physical background for understanding the operation of an ideal interferometer, illustrates those ideas with example interferograms obtained via ideal and nonideal interferometers, and shows how the maximum amount of information can be extracted from the interferograms. Finally, it shows how sampling and noise affect the spectrum.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780120425105
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Publication date:
05/01/2001
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
0.63(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
Why Choose a Fourier Transform Spectrometer?
Theory of the Ideal Instrument
Fourier Analysis
Nonideal (Real-World) Interferograms
Working with Digital Spectra and Fourier Transforms
Phase Corrections and Their Significance
Effects of Noise in Its Various Forms
Line Positions, Line Profiles, and Fitting
Processing of Spectral Data
Discussions, Interventions, Digressions, and Obscurations
Chapter-by-Chapter Bibliography
Chronological Bibliography
Applications Bibliography
Author Bibliography
Index

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >