The Fractal Geometry of Nature

The Fractal Geometry of Nature

3.6 6
by Benoit B. Mandelbrot
     
 

Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, and lightening does not travel in a straight line. The complexity of nature's shapes differs in kind, not merely degree, from that of the shapes of ordinary geometry, the geometry of fractal shapes.

Now that the field has expanded greatly with many active researchers, Mandelbrot presents the definitive overview of

Overview

Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, and lightening does not travel in a straight line. The complexity of nature's shapes differs in kind, not merely degree, from that of the shapes of ordinary geometry, the geometry of fractal shapes.

Now that the field has expanded greatly with many active researchers, Mandelbrot presents the definitive overview of the origins of his ideas and their new applications. The Fractal Geometry of Nature is based on his highly acclaimed earlier work, but has much broader and deeper coverage and more extensive illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A rarity: a picture book of sophisticated contemporary research ideas in mathematics.” —Douglas Hofstadter, author of Godel, Escher, Bach

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780716711865
Publisher:
Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/15/1982
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
8.23(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.57(d)

Meet the Author

Benoit Mandelbrot is the Abraham Robinson Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Yale University and IBM Fellow Emeritus at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center.

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Fractal Geometry of Nature 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the book that started Fractal Geometry. Neitsche once said that mathematics would not have come into existence if man had known that in nature there was no such thing as a straight line. Mandlebrot's groundbreaking work reveals mathematics at work in the shapes of objects such as clouds, tree branches, and so forth. A breakthrough way of thinking. My only criticism is that the book assumes some basic knowledge of math.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Mandelbrot presents unique and infinitely deep look at nature. The emerging theory of interaction shows that his notion of fractal turned to be more fruitful than anyone could guess.