Fragile Tears: Stories and Guidance for Youth on the Passing Away of Beloved Animal Companions

Fragile Tears: Stories and Guidance for Youth on the Passing Away of Beloved Animal Companions

by Alan Blain Cunningham
     
 
Comforting stories and drawings of beloved pets. Youth especially have a difficult time with the loss of a beloved animal companion. Because often times it is their first exposure to death, or the animal is their very first best friend. Grief over the loss of a beloved animal companion can be devastating and isolating. Many times society doesn't recognize or accept

Overview

Comforting stories and drawings of beloved pets. Youth especially have a difficult time with the loss of a beloved animal companion. Because often times it is their first exposure to death, or the animal is their very first best friend. Grief over the loss of a beloved animal companion can be devastating and isolating. Many times society doesn't recognize or accept the depth of grief that people experience.

After the uncontrollable tears of sadness, we begin to heal, sometimes very slowly. Gradually, as we begin to heal, we remember our lost loved one with mixed emotions of grief and joy. And often times, without the slightest warning, we feel a delicate tear on our cheek. A fragile tear created mostly by love. May this book provide comfort and guidance to youth that have lost a beloved animal companion.

The accompanying complimentary CD Fragile Tears is a compilation of music from various artists. It is meant to provide positive and reflective healing to the listener.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781888106671
Publisher:
Agreka Books
Publication date:
04/15/2005
Edition description:
BOOK & CD
Pages:
103
Product dimensions:
8.12(w) x 9.98(h) x 0.26(d)
Age Range:
7 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

George, Our Pekingese

Dear Son,
I sit here as you come to me with tears in your eyes. You have just laid to rest a friend who has stood by you for twenty of your twenty-two years. For a few days you will remember him vividly. But then he will pass into the other special memories of your childhood as you go on to other pursuits and perhaps one day even replace him. You will never forget him entirely because he was your first pet.

He came to you with wagging tail and licking tongue when you were but a lad of two. He asked no quota of anyone, except love, a pat on the back, and food when hungry. In return, he gave of himself many fold - unconditional love at its best.

When young, he was full of life - enjoying everything to the fullest and making you and others around him feel good just by his antics.

As you grew into a teenager and were out at night, he waited up for you - no matter if it was midnight from a date or earlier in the evening from church or school. He knew you would be home by ten p.m. and in some way he knew when it reached that time. He began his vigil then, which often included more pacing than even I did. His curfew was tougher than mine.

Each morning he would wait at the head of the stairs for you to turn on your light, then would go about his business, knowing all was right with his boy. At other times he would stop, not bothering you, but watching his special friend study or read, and be content just to be near.

When you left home, he kept up the ritual, not understanding why the light no longer shone nor his friend appear and why no one waited up for you at night.

Advancing years caught up with him, as it does withall of us, and he began walking slower, with a touch of arthritis in his legs. He was happy to spend his time lying against the heater.

His teeth were knocked out when his legs gave away and he tumbled down the basement stairs. Gradually his eyesight failed and his hearing went, but still he didn't complain, asking only for love, food, and a warm place to sleep. Then, having lost his erception, he began going in circles when attempting to move alone. And yet, he remained a faithful friend.

Now he has left us, but his memory will always be with us and his presence felt in our heart - a small black Pekingese with his distinctive white markings.

Just a dog, although a female, named George.

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