Fragment of the Head of a Queen: Poems

( 1 )

Overview

Fragment of the Head of a Queen makes it clear why Cate Marvin is becoming one of our essential poets.”—Rodney Jones

Cate Marvin’s new poems, their wrought music, unblinking focus, and hard-edged sensuality, are wreathed with an entirely different silence than her first collection. The brokenness and loss of the fragmented queen—seeming to rise up through centuries—is their tutelary spirit.

Cate Marvin is the author of World’s Tallest ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (12) from $5.31   
  • New (3) from $7.97   
  • Used (9) from $5.31   
Sending request ...

Overview

Fragment of the Head of a Queen makes it clear why Cate Marvin is becoming one of our essential poets.”—Rodney Jones

Cate Marvin’s new poems, their wrought music, unblinking focus, and hard-edged sensuality, are wreathed with an entirely different silence than her first collection. The brokenness and loss of the fragmented queen—seeming to rise up through centuries—is their tutelary spirit.

Cate Marvin is the author of World’s Tallest Disaster, awarded the 2000 Kathryn A. Morton Prize by Robert Pinsky and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award (2002). She teaches creative writing in Staten Island, New York.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

From the blood-soaked cover image of a Snow White-like figure to the final poem ("You Cut Open"), there is both violence and humor in the 42 lyrics of Marvin's second book. In her often amped-up sonics ("standing neck-deep in a pit, whisky-pitched, ether-lit"), her formal skill and her penchant for anger-filled poems on the love/hate of self and beloved, Marvin (World's Tallest Disaster) suggests a postmodern Plath. But the smirk on the speaker's face-she is both deadly serious and deadly funny-points these poems past melodrama. "Dear less-than-a-man," writes Marvin, "I think with my blood." Often the humor comes when the absurdity of the actual world is mixed with that of the speaker's world ("my unsubsidized loan heart"). Marvin also manages a more intimate voice: "I would be the worm to your rain soaked side/ walk." Such tenderness is welcome among so much grief, but so is the ambivalence of Marvin's elegy detailing a lover's autopsy. Readers who can believe "all love/ should be loud enough to scare off the neighbors" will swoon for this work. (Aug.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

In her second collection (after the award-winning World's Tallest Disaster), Marvin uses fresh language as she tackles familiar but provoking questions of love, selfhood, and how one really lives in the world. While her jaded view often refreshes ("The world felt bad. Every leaf looked/like it needed a cigarette."), several of the poems fall flat at closure, e.g., "The Pet": "I cannot remove him without killing him,/which frankly, I have never wanted to do." In fact, this collection swings from striking poems with vivid images to poems that plod along in dense, phrase-bound lines (e.g., "It is sorry, then, the haul come to nothing/in the net, only more weight of pages/and pages to trod with upon our backs"). But what keeps readers involved are the many chances Marvin takes; she also masterfully expresses mood and captures nature in a distinctive way that compels rereadings, as in "Azaleas": "Blooms pink as baby mice, soft as tiny hands, cluttering/the bush as if in celebration." An uneven collection, but the good poems far outweigh the bad, and even the lesser offerings provide interesting perspectives and surprises. Recommended for all academic libraries and for mid-sized to large public libraries.
—Doris Lynch

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781932511512
  • Publisher: Sarabande Books
  • Publication date: 8/1/2007
  • Pages: 74
  • Sales rank: 1,238,576
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Marvin's first book, World's Tallest Disaster (Sarabande, 2002) was awarded the 2001 Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry by Robert Pinsky and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award (2002). Her poems have appeared in New England Review, The Antioch Review, The Paris Review, The Georgia Review, and Ploughshares, among others. She is a creative writing professor in Staten Island

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    Seems akin to most contemporary poetry: a mixture of pretense, i

    Seems akin to most contemporary poetry: a mixture of pretense, informality, and prose with some clever metaphor.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)