Fragments of the Lost Writings of Proclus (Formatted with TOC) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Thomas Taylor (15 May 1758 - 1 November 1835) was an English translator and Neoplatonist, the first to translate into English the complete works of Aristotle and of Plato, as well as the Orphic fragments. He translated the fragments of Proclus Lycaeus (8 February 412 – 17 April 487 AD), called "The Successor" or "Diadochos,” who was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers (see Damascius). He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He ...
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Fragments of the Lost Writings of Proclus (Formatted with TOC)

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Overview

Thomas Taylor (15 May 1758 - 1 November 1835) was an English translator and Neoplatonist, the first to translate into English the complete works of Aristotle and of Plato, as well as the Orphic fragments. He translated the fragments of Proclus Lycaeus (8 February 412 – 17 April 487 AD), called "The Successor" or "Diadochos,” who was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers (see Damascius). He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy (Greek and Latin) as well as Islamic thought.

Before completing his studies, Proclus returned to Constantinopole when his rector, his principal instructor (one Leonas), had business there. Proclus became a successful practicing lawyer. However, the experience of the practice of law made Proclus realize that he truly preferred philosophy. He returned to Alexandria, and began determinedly studying the works of Aristotle under Olympiodorus the Elder (he also began studying mathematics during this period as well with a teacher named Heron (no relation to Hero of Alexandria who was also known as Heron). Eventually, this gifted student became dissatisfied with the level of philosophical instruction available in Alexandria, and went to Athens, the preeminent philosophical center of the day, in 431 to study at the Neoplatonic successor of the famous Academy founded 800 years (in 387 BC) before by Plato; there he was taught by Plutarch of Athens, Syrianus, and Asclepigenia; he succeeded Syrianus as head of the Academy, and would in turn be succeeded on his death by Marinus of Neapolis. He lived in Athens as a vegetarian bachelor, prosperous and generous to his friends, until the end of his life, except for a voluntary one year exile, which was designed to lessen the pressure put on him by his political-philosophical activity, little appreciated by the Christian rulers; he spent the exile traveling and being initiated into various mystery cults as befitted his universal approach to religion, trying to become "a priest of the entire universe." His house has been discovered recently in Athens, under the pavement, south of Acropolis, opposite the theater of Dionysus.

This edition of Fragments of the Lost Writings of Proclus is specially formatted with a Table of Contents.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013186170
  • Publisher: Charles River Editors
  • Publication date: 8/9/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 77 KB

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