Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus

Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus

by Thomas Taylor
     
 

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Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus
by Thomas Taylor

"Proclus Lycaeus (February 8, 412 - April 17, 485), surnamed "The Successor" or "diadochos" was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers (see Damascius). He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end… See more details below

Overview

Fragments Of The Lost Writings Of Proclus
by Thomas Taylor

"Proclus Lycaeus (February 8, 412 - April 17, 485), surnamed "The Successor" or "diadochos" was a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers (see Damascius). He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western Medieval Philosophy (Greek and Latin) as well as Islamic thought."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012429483
Publisher:
Apps Publisher
Publication date:
04/29/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

"Thomas Taylor (15 May 1758 - 1 November 1835) was an English translator and Neoplatonist, the first to translate into English the complete works of Aristotle and of Plato, as well as the Orphic fragments. The texts that he used had been edited since the 16th century, but were interrupted by lacunae; Taylor's thorough understanding of the Platonists informed his suggested emendations, which, when better manuscripts have been found, were often proved just. His translations were influential to William Blake, Percy Bysshe Shelley and William Wordsworth. In American editions they were read by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Bronson Alcott, and G.R.S. Mead, secretary of Mme Blavatsky the founder of Theosophy. He and his wife took Mary Wollstonecraft, into their home when she was an unhappy teenager, and thus influenced the future author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman."

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