Framed in Fire [NOOK Book]

Overview

Peter’s been sent to Resthaven Hospital because his stepfather thinks Peter is emotionally disturbed and wants to harm his younger half-brother, Lincoln. But Peter loves Lincoln, and Peter is the only one who knows about Lincoln’s unusual dreams. And Peter’s mom has been lying to him about his real dad. If his dad died, why can’t he find any information about the fishing boat accident that was supposed to have killed him? With the help of Lincoln and some friends from Resthaven, Peter begins a journey that could ...
See more details below
Framed in Fire

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digital Original)
$5.49
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$5.99 List Price

Overview

Peter’s been sent to Resthaven Hospital because his stepfather thinks Peter is emotionally disturbed and wants to harm his younger half-brother, Lincoln. But Peter loves Lincoln, and Peter is the only one who knows about Lincoln’s unusual dreams. And Peter’s mom has been lying to him about his real dad. If his dad died, why can’t he find any information about the fishing boat accident that was supposed to have killed him? With the help of Lincoln and some friends from Resthaven, Peter begins a journey that could change his life forever. “Patneaude’s story has enough tension and suspense to keep the pages turning.” —School Library Journal When David Patneaude was a youngster, his favorite story was Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, a tale of adventure, suspense, mystery, and best of all, buried treasure. David never found pirate plunder of his own, but now he digs for a different kind of hidden loot—story ideas. David lives in Woodinville, Washington, with his wife, a junior-high-school librarian. They have three grown children and two grandsons.    

When his stepfather conspires to keep thirteen-year-old Peter at a mental institution, Peter begins to piece together secrets about his past with the help of his younger brother's strangely prophetic dreams.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Although the plot quickly drifts into the realm of the improbable, readers willing to suspend disbelief will find an above-average potboiler. From the beginning it is clear that narrator Peter is neither hyperactive nor crazy, despite the allegations of his villainous stepfather Buck (owner of Buck Champagne Motors). Buck, however, holds an unexplained grudge against Peter and convinces doctors to commit him to a psychiatric hospital. Once at Resthaven, where most of the story takes place, Peter receives frequent phone calls from his psychic younger half-brother, who convinces Peter that his real father, who supposedly died years ago, is still alive. With the help of two fellow "inmates" (flat caricatures of an anorexic girl and a traumatized boy) and a compassionate aide, Peter makes a daring escape from the hospital in order to learn the truth about his father's disappearance. The story's mix of fast-paced action, psychological drama and family conflict, all spiced with a pinch of the paranormal, has mass appeal. Patneaude's (The Last Man's Reward) one-sided appraisal of psychiatrists and "evil" stepfathers may raise some eyebrows, but will not necessarily stop pages from turning. Ages 11-14. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Melissa A. Caudill
Peter is an ordinary teenager who occasionally gets into a playground fight at school. Buck, his uncaring stepfather successfully convinces Peter's mother and doctor to have Peter admitted to a hospital for troubled youths and to take medication for depression. There, Peter meets several mixed-up, but loyal friends at this group home. He has a growing affection for an anorexic girl named Sarah who stands by him when he needs her the most. Also, a technician named Edward befriends Peter and with his help Peter discovers that his mother may have been lying to him about his real father's alleged death when he was a toddler. Determined to discover the truth and escape from the group home, Edward and Peter set off to try to locate his father. This is a realistic, suspenseful story that will capture readers' attention and keep them moving on to the next chapter.
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-Peter Larson's father died in an accident-at least that's the story his mother has always told him. The boy has an increasingly hostile relationship with his verbally abusive stepfather, Buck, and some scuffles at school, but is basically a good kid. While he deals with his ambivalent feelings toward his parents, his younger half-brother, Lincoln, reports having "real dreams"-visions, actually, of events in their lives. The youngster's ability to "see" a fire at a neighbor's house helps to avert a disaster, but in the commotion, Lincoln falls down the stairs and Buck accuses Peter of deliberately trying to harm the toddler. The next stop for Peter is the Resthaven Psychiatric Facility where the staff, except for the psychiatrist Buck insists on dealing with, take a supportive role in trying to get the family back in balance. It's lonely and confusing in the hospital, but Peter finds consolation in an old favorite storybook. One day, its familiar bookplate comes loose, and Peter finds evidence that his mother has lied to him about his father. He wonders what else she has lied about and if his father might still be alive. So begins Peter's quest to find out the truth. Patneaude's story has enough tension and suspense to keep the pages turning. The book tackles many serious issues, including parental kidnapping, ADD, blended families, and teenage depression. The characters are well rounded enough to remain believable. This story of a teen in search of his identity is a good addition for most collections.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Patneaude (The Last Man's Reward, 1996, etc.) hatches a silly plot and one-dimensional characters, but preteens might enjoy this piece of escapist entertainment about a boy wrongly committed to a mental asylum. Peter's weak-willed mother has lied to him all his life about his real father, allegedly dead. Peter doesn't get along with his stepfather, a car salesman, who schemes to have him committed by a corrupt psychiatrist. In the asylum, Peter befriends two disturbed inmates and a health technician who help him escape. Among the absurd plot concoctions: Peter's five-year-old half-brother, Lincoln, is psychic, allowing Peter extraordinary access to clues he needs to find his real father; and that his father has been searching for Peter all along. Patneaude resurrects elements from his first novel, Someone Was Watching (1993), in which a supposedly drowned sister has really been kidnapped, and in which a cross-country trip unfolds without much mishap. His writing style, however, is so robust that even if readers find little remotely connected to reality in these pages, there's more than enough suspense in the fast-paced narrative to keep them entertained. (Fiction. 8-13)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781480466494
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 1/14/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digital Original
  • Pages: 216
  • Sales rank: 884,320
  • Age range: 11 - 14 Years
  • File size: 262 KB

Meet the Author

 When David Patneaude was a youngster, his favorite story was Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, a tale of adventure, suspense, mystery, and best of all, buried treasure. David never found pirate plunder of his own, but now he digs for a different kind of hidden loot—story ideas. David lives in Woodinville, Washington, with his wife, a junior-high-school librarian. They have three grown children and two grandsons.  
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2002

    This book is GREAT

    I absolutely love this book! I would read it again and again if I had the time.I recommend this book to everyone and anyone who loves a good book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2002

    A great book!!!

    This is one of the best books I have ever read. I think I liked this book because I also have a step father. I think this is great book for all kids who have step parents and for kids even if they don't have step parents. Well that is about it and I hope you enjoy this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2001

    Interesting

    This book was very interesting. I had a little trouble following it in the beginning. It was very hard to understand. I think David Patneaude could have expanded a little more in the beginning and given a little more detail about Peter to tell us who he was and introduce him better to the audience. I think the overall message was displayed though. Framed in Fire was about a boy,Peter, who was very confused. He loved his little brother, Lincoln, very much. One night, Lincoln had a bad dream. He dreamt that the next door neighbor's house had caught on fire. The problem was, it really did. He told Peter it was like he was there. He could actually see the flames licking the ceiling. That is when Peter discovers that his little brother is special. Peter's step-father Buck does not like him. He's obsessed with Lincoln. When Lincoln trips over Peter one night and falls down the stairs, Buck blames Peter. He has Peter talk to a psychiatrist. The first doctor thought Peter was fine, but Buck was not satisfied with that. He has him see Dr. Lubber, who is taking sides with Buck. After he visits Dr. Lubber, Peter is committed to a mental hospital. Lincoln and Peter keep in touch through Lincoln's dreams. While he's there, Peter makes some new friends, and finds out some astonishing things from his past. Over all, David Patneaude wrote an amazing story. It takes you on emotional roller coasters as you follow Peter, and watch him grow in front of your very eyes. I would recommend this book who likes very intriguing stories, filled with laughter and pain, joy and sorrow.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)