Framing Disease: Studies in Cultural History / Edition 1

Framing Disease: Studies in Cultural History / Edition 1

by Charles E. Rosenberg
     
 

ISBN-10: 0813517575

ISBN-13: 9780813517575

Pub. Date: 03/01/1992

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

"In some ways disease does not exist until we have agreed that it does, by perceiving, naming, and responding to it," writes Charles E. Rosenberg in his introduction to this stimulating set of essays. Disease is both a biological and a social phenomenon. Patient, doctor, family, and social institutions--including employers, government, and insurance companies--all…  See more details below

Overview

"In some ways disease does not exist until we have agreed that it does, by perceiving, naming, and responding to it," writes Charles E. Rosenberg in his introduction to this stimulating set of essays. Disease is both a biological and a social phenomenon. Patient, doctor, family, and social institutions--including employers, government, and insurance companies--all find ways to frame the biological event in terms that make sense to them and serve their own ends.

Many diseases discussed here--endstage renal disease, rheumatic fever, parasitic infectious diseases, coronary thrombosis--came to be defined, redefined, and renamed over the course of several centuries. As these essays show, the concept of disease has also been used to frame culturally resonant behaviors: suicide, homosexuality, anorexia nervosa, chronic fatigue syndrome. Disease is also framed by public policy, as the cases of industrial disability and forensic psychiatry demonstrate. Medicl institutions, as managers of people with disease, come to have vested interests in diagnoses, as the histories of facilities to treat tuberculosis or epilepsy reveal. Ultimately, the existence and conquest of disease serve to frame a society's sense of its own "healthiness" and to give direction to social reforms.

The contributors include Steven J. Peitzman, Peter C. English, John Farley, Christopher Lawrence, Michael Macdonald, Bert Hansen, Joan Jacobs Brumberg, Robert A. Aronowitz, Gerald Markowitz, David Rosner, Janet A. Tighe, Barbara Bates, Ellen Dwyer, John M. Eyler, and Elizabeth Fee. Charles Rosenberg is Janice and Julian Bers Professor of the History of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Janet Golden is an assistant professor of history at Rutgers University.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813517575
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Publication date:
03/01/1992
Series:
Health and Medicine in American Society Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
1,296,212
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction Framing Disease: Illness, Society, and History
Pt. 1Framing Disease
1From Bright's Disease to End-Stage Renal Disease3
2Emergence of Rheumatic Fever in the Nineteenth Century20
3Parasites and the Germ Theory of Disease33
4"Definite and Material": Coronary Thrombosis and Cardiologists in the 1920s50
Pt. 2Disease as Frame
5The Medicalization of Suicide in England: Laymen, Physicians, and Cultural Change, 1500-187085
6American Physicians' "Discovery" of Homosexuals, 1880-1900: A New Diagnosis in a Changing Society104
7From Psychiatric Syndrome to "Communicable" Disease: The Case of Anorexia Nervosa134
8From Myalgic Encephalitis to Yuppie Flu: A History of Chronic Fatigue Syndromes155
Pt. 3Negotiating Disease: The Public Arena
9The Illusion of Medical Certainty: Silicosis and the Politics of Industrial Disability, 1930-1960185
10The Legal Art of Psychiatric Diagnosis: Searching for Reliability206
Pt. 4Managing Disease: Institutions as Mediators
11Quid pro Quo in Chronic Illness: Tuberculosis in Pennsylvania, 1876-1926229
12Stories of Epilepsy, 1880-1930248
Pt. 5Disease as Social Diagnosis
13The Sick Poor and the State: Arthur Newsholme on Poverty, Disease, and Responsibility275
14Henry E. Sigerist: His Interpretations of the History of Disease and the Future of Medicine297
List of Contributors319
Index323

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