Francesco's Venice: The Dramatic History of the World's Most Beautiful City

Francesco's Venice: The Dramatic History of the World's Most Beautiful City

by Francesco da Mosto, John Parker
     
 

Francesco's Venice is the extraordinary story of the life of this intriguing city, told by a descendant of an old and distinguished Venetian family.

Francesco da Mosto's ancestral history is inextricably intertwined with that of this amphibious city. Fiercely proud and protective of the rich cultural and architectural heritage of his birthplace, Francesco gives us

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Overview

Francesco's Venice is the extraordinary story of the life of this intriguing city, told by a descendant of an old and distinguished Venetian family.

Francesco da Mosto's ancestral history is inextricably intertwined with that of this amphibious city. Fiercely proud and protective of the rich cultural and architectural heritage of his birthplace, Francesco gives us a unique insight into the inner workings of one of the most beautiful cities in the world. He explores Venice's remarkable history, from the fifth century when the first settlers retreated to the safety of the lagoon and began to create their homes on its tiny islands, through its glorious years as a successful maritime nation, adept at trade, exploration, diplomacy and protecting its independence, to the fragile city of the twenty-first century.

Venice's history is a tale of warfare and conspiracies, of artistic excellence and ingenuity, of the battle of wills and of ideas, and of strength in the face of disaster, and Francesco vividly brings to life the places, events and people that have sculpted this living theatre through the ages. These include a colourful array of his own ancestors, such as the six da Mostos who were involved in the rise and fall of the ambitious and corrupt Doge Falier, and the young Alvise da Mosto, a courageous and determined explorer of the fifteenth century.

Beautifully illustrated with stunning images by John Parker of both the magnificent symbols of the city, including St Mark's Basilica and the Doge's Palace, and the more secluded corners, Francesco's Venice celebrates the mesmerizing beauty and surprising strength of this unique city.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Architect, historian, and filmmaker da Mosto provides a well-researched history of Venice, from its beginnings as an independent republic to its becoming the center of world trade in the 1400s to its current status as an Italian seaport. Da Mosta, who hosts the BBC television presentation for which this serves as a companion, adds a personal touch by interweaving his family's 1600-year contribution. He explains how the Venetians developed their own language, made their own coins, possessed more printing presses than any other city, and built their own ships to protect their treasured island from foreign invaders. Included are numerous one-page profiles on topics like the Rialto Bridge, the Jewish ghetto, Marco Polo, gondolas, and the celebration of Carnival. Da Mosto also traces the use and abuse of political power entrusted to the long line of doges and the Council of Ten (the special tribunal created to avert plots against the state) and the effects of that power on local citizens. Parker's superb illustrations nicely complement the text; the only shortcoming is the lack of any maps to illustrate the ports and boundaries described by the author. Recommended for all libraries.-Richard A. Dickey, Dallas Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780563521372
Publisher:
B B C Worldwide Americas
Publication date:
02/28/2007
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 11.10(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are saying about this

John Berendt
"An enchanting, immensely readable, superbly illustrated introduction to the history and legends of Venice by a consummate insider."
—author of The City of Falling Angels

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