Franciscan Days: Being Selections For Every Day In The Year From Ancient Franciscan Writings (1906)

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S. FRANCIS AND THE BEGGAR T7RANCIS had a kind of natural courtesy in L his ways and words, and never said an unkind or unseemly word to anyone. Nay, more, though he was a merry and wanton youth, he determined to give no answer to ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
S. FRANCIS AND THE BEGGAR T7RANCIS had a kind of natural courtesy in L his ways and words, and never said an unkind or unseemly word to anyone. Nay, more, though he was a merry and wanton youth, he determined to give no answer to any who spoke unseemly words to him. In consequence of this, his fame so spread over almost the whole province that many who knew him said that he would do some great thing. . . . Though he was in trade, he was a very frivolous spender of worldly wealth ; but one day, when he was about his business in the shop where he used to sell, a poor man came to him asking alms for the love of God. Held back by greed of riches and care of business, he refused alms to the beggar. But the grace of God looked on him, and he accused himself of great churlishness, saying : ' If the poor man had asked thee for something for the sake of a great Count or Baron, thou wouldst surely have given him what he asked for. How much rather, then, oughtest thou to have done it for the sake of the King of kings and Lord of all !' And on account of this he determined thenceforth never to refuse anything asked of him for the sake of so great a Lord.—3 Soc. 3. chapter{Section 4S. FRANCIS' CAPTIVITY AT PERUGIA ONCE, when there was war between Perugia and Assisi, Francis, with many of his fellow-citizens, was taken prisoner, and was kept with them in captivity at Perugia. However, as he was of noble bearing, he was imprisoned with the Knights. One day, when his fellow-prisoners were gloomy, he, being of a naturally cheerful and merry disposition, seemed not to be gloomy, but to be in some sort rejoicing. One of his companions chode with him for this, and told him he was behaving like a madman to rejoice even when in prison. Francis replied with warmth : ' What is it you think about...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781165458189
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/10/2010
  • Pages: 394
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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S. FRANCIS AND THE BEGGAR T7RANCIS had a kind of natural courtesy in L his ways and words, and never said an unkind or unseemly word to anyone. Nay, more, though he was a merry and wanton youth, he determined to give no answer to any who spoke unseemly words to him. In consequence of this, his fame so spread over almost the whole province that many who knew him said that he would do some great thing. . . . Though he was in trade, he was a very frivolous spender of worldly wealth ; but one day, when he was about his business in the shop where he used to sell, a poor man came to him asking alms for the love of God. Held back by greed of riches and care of business, he refused alms to the beggar. But the grace of God looked on him, and he accused himself of great churlishness, saying : ' If the poor man had asked thee for something for the sake of a great Count or Baron, thou wouldst surely have given him what he asked for. How much rather, then, oughtest thou to have done it for the sake of the King of kings and Lord of all !' And on account of this he determined thenceforth never to refuse anything asked of him for the sake of so great a Lord.—3 Soc. 3. chapter{Section 4S. FRANCIS' CAPTIVITY AT PERUGIA ONCE, when there was war between Perugia and Assisi, Francis, with many of his fellow-citizens, was taken prisoner, and was kept with them in captivity at Perugia. However, as he was of noble bearing, he was imprisoned with the Knights. One day, when his fellow-prisoners were gloomy, he, being of a naturally cheerful and merry disposition, seemed not to be gloomy, but to be in some sort rejoicing. One of his companions chode with him for this, and told him he was behavinglike a madman to rejoice even when in prison. Francis replied with warmth : ' What is it you think about...
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