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Frangoline and the Midnight Dream
     

Frangoline and the Midnight Dream

by Clemency Pearce, Rebecca Elliott (Illustrator)
 

Good Girl Gone Bad! An adorably dark picture book about the naughty midnight exploits of an impish litttle girl.

During the day, Frangoline's a perfect little angel. But in the darkest shadows of night, when all good children are sleeping tight, this little imp dons her jet-black cape and makes a break for it! Out the window, across the grass, screeching like a

Overview


Good Girl Gone Bad! An adorably dark picture book about the naughty midnight exploits of an impish litttle girl.

During the day, Frangoline's a perfect little angel. But in the darkest shadows of night, when all good children are sleeping tight, this little imp dons her jet-black cape and makes a break for it! Out the window, across the grass, screeching like a banshee, twirling like a dervish! The worried Moon looks down, warning, "Little ones should be in bed!"

"You can't tell me what to do. I'm Frangoline!" she says.

But when Frangoline's dancing antics wake the dead and they chase her to the tippy-top of the church steeple, how will she escape? And will she learn her lesson?

For every parent who has faced a fight at bedtime, and for every child just beginning to assert her independence, this is an adorably dark storybook about a (sweet but) wicked girl. The perfect rhyming Halloween read for all the little angels with a little devil inside!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Frangoline has a double life. By day, she’s “bright and clean,/ She always ate up all her greens,” but at night, she dons a black cape and romps through the forest, scaring animals and even the fretful moon who “gazed down in fear and dread,/ Warning, ‘Little ones should be in bed!’ ” When the little tyrant disturbs graveyard ghouls, she has a change of heart. Elliott’s mixed-media illustrations create a gently wicked nocturnal atmosphere that, along with Pearce’s boundary-testing heroine, set the tone for a mischievous Halloween. Ages 3�5. (Aug.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Frangoline is a very good girl, usually. But in the "deepest dark of night," she sneaks from her room to wreak havoc on the world. "I'll do exactly as I please! I'm Frangoline!" Ignoring the Moon's words of caution, "She tore around upon the grass,/Blowing raspberries as she passed." Next she awakens and scares off a slew of fierce forest creatures, including a bear, a fox, and a skunk. Finally, Frangoline goes too far. She dances upon the churchyard tombstones, waking the ghosts, who then chase her as she makes her escape up the steeple and onto the Moon's head. From there she apologizes to those she has harassed, and her new friends tuck her safely into bed where she promises to be good, "at least until tomorrow night!" The fun-to-read rhyming text is depicted in various fonts and sizes and is well integrated with the color illustrations. Elliott's use of texture, detail, clear expressions, and splashes of white creates a spooky atmosphere as befits the story. Children will identify with Frangoline's wild side and her plan to be good—at least for a while.—Catherine Callegari, Gay-Kimball Library, Troy, NH
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Frangoline is a very good child—in the daytime. But late in the night she dons a jet-black velvet cape and makes a midnight hour escape. A sad-eyed moon gazes down on her and warns that little ones should be in bed. Frangoline responds that she does exactly as she pleases. She slides down a tree trunk, races over the grass, and enters a forest where she awakens fierce creatures from their sleep. She yelps with an awful sound scaring the beasts and continues to the cemetery. Frangoline puts on a naughty nighttime show, dancing, and prancing across the tombstones. She ignores the moon's warning and awakens the dead. Moaning and groaning, the ghosts rise and chase Frangoline to the top of the church steeple. In her fear, she jumps across the sky and onto the moon. She utters an apology and is next shown in her bed, defeated for now, but not contrite. Frangoline looks ghoulish herself with a very white face and bright red hair wearing a white long-sleeved nightgown. The aforementioned black cape is mostly lost in the dark scenes. The text written in verse detracts from the story. It lacks a regular rhythm and many of the rhymes are forced and unnatural. Not a first choice for either storytime or for bedtime. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
Kirkus Reviews

Debut author Pearce introduces redhead Frangoline, who is "Pure as milk and good as gold" by day but turns into an impish minx at night.

She escapes cloaked in her cape and wreaks havoc, rudely awakening fearsome night creatures and recklessly dancing on tombstones. Poor moon worries from above and repeatedly warns, "Little ones should be in bed!" The naughty girl defiantly continues her nighttime fun—she's Frangoline, after all. But the disturbed ghosts rise up and chase Frangoline to the steeple's top, where she ends up trapped and petrified. "She gazed 'round with fear and dread. / She cried, 'I think it's time for bed!' " Moon rescues a now-contrite Frangoline, who quickly finds herself "snug and warm in bed"—at least for now. Elliott ably portrays the young girl's gleeful wickedness amid deep, dark backgrounds that contrast nicely with Frangoline's fiery hair and white nightgown. Preschoolers and their parents will relate to the girl's changeable nature and are likely to relish her willful adventure. The text unnecessarily changes typefaces and sizes and sprawls in a busy variety of curves, wobbly lines and slanted diagonals. This reflects the girl's chaotic actions, but it feels overdesigned. Moreover, the rhyming text mostly flows, but the repeated, slightly altered refrain lacks a syllable and trips the tongue.

Still, despite imperfections, young readers will likely embrace the quirky, oddly endearing Frangoline.(Picture book. 3-6)

Pamela Paul
Parents will love the girl's gumption, and children will adore her irreverence. Elliott's dark, scratchy, animated drawings will please both.
—The New York Times Book Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545314268
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
502,447
Product dimensions:
9.60(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD730L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author


Clemency Pearce lives in Essex, England, with her toothless Persian cat, Lola. FRANGOLINE is her first book.

Rebecca Elliott has illustrated many books for children. She lives with her husband, daughter, son, and cat in the countryside of Suffolk, England. Visit her at www.rebeccaelliott.com.

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