×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Frankenstein (Qualitas Classics)
     

Frankenstein (Qualitas Classics)

5.0 1
by Mary Shelley
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 1897093519

ISBN-13: 9781897093511

Pub. Date: 05/01/2012

Publisher: Qualitas Publishing

Frankenstein (also titled The Modern Prometheus but now generally referred to as Frankenstein), was written by Mary Shelley and first published anonymously in 1818. The title makes reference to one of the novel's main characters, a scientist named Victor Frankenstein, who learns how to create life. The monster itself has mistakenly been referred to as "Frankenstein",

Overview

Frankenstein (also titled The Modern Prometheus but now generally referred to as Frankenstein), was written by Mary Shelley and first published anonymously in 1818. The title makes reference to one of the novel's main characters, a scientist named Victor Frankenstein, who learns how to create life. The monster itself has mistakenly been referred to as "Frankenstein", after its creator. The being Frankenstein creates is formed from pieces of buried remains that are brought to life with a spark of electricity. Intended to be made in the image of man, the being turns out to be larger than average and more powerful. The saga becomes increasingly frightening as man loses control over beast. The story has become a classic and stands as a leader in the horror genre. This publication of Frankenstein is part of the Qualitas Classics Fireside Series, where pure, ageless classics are presented in clean, easy to read reprints. For a complete list of titles, see: http://www.qualitaspublishing.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781897093511
Publisher:
Qualitas Publishing
Publication date:
05/01/2012
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
236
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.54(d)

Table of Contents

About the Series
About This Volume

PART I: FRANKENSTEIN: THE COMPLETE TEXT
Introduction: Biographical and Historical Contexts
The Complete Text [The 1831 Text]

PART II: FRANKENSTEIN: A CASE STUDY IN CONTEMPORARY CRITICISM
A Critical History of Frankenstein
A Psychoanalytic Perspective:
David Collings, "The Monster and the Imaginary Monster: A Lacanian Reading of Frankenstein"
A Marxist Perspective:
Warren Montag, "'The Workshop of Filthy Creation': A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein"
A Feminist Perspective:
Johanna M. Smith, "'Cooped Up: Feminine Domesticity in Frankenstein"
New A Gender Critic's Perspective:
Frann Michel, "Lesbian Panic and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein"
New A Cultural Critic's Perspective:
Bouriana Zakharieva, "Frankenstein of the Nineties: The Composite Body"
New Combining Critical Perspectives:
Fred Botting, "Reflections of Excess: Frankenstein, the French Revolution, and Monstrosity"

Glossary of Critical and Theoretical Terms
About the Contributors

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Frankenstein 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Scotman55 More than 1 year ago
In 1831, teenager Mary Shelly put together a novel that would echo down the centuries as one of the most horrific and complex novels to come down the line in some time. When I first read this book I thought I would see some resemblance to the 1931 Karloff film, but I could not be more wrong. The novel is as complex in its vocabulary, its ability to elicit emotion from the reader and its horror. The book starts out on a ship that is exploring the extreme north, where ice floes and freezing temperatures are the norm. The captain sees a figure on a dogsled going across the landscape. He thinks this is weird. Then he later finds a man on an ice sheet near death. The captain, Robert Walton, pulls him aboard and is amazed at his articulate manner (I guess hanging out with sailors all day for weeks does that to you). His name is Henry Frankenstein. Henry finds that Robert has some interest in bringing things to life, etc., and experimentations of that nature. Henry freaks out and says no, let me tell you my story. And so it goes. Though Shelly's language is at times a bit of a chore to get through, I was impressed with the flow and style of the story, her commentaries on family, Nature, the poor, and Man daring to act the role of Creator. The details of Victor creating the creature are a bit weak, but understandable. After all I'm sure Henry did not want to give all the details otherwise we'd be setting up shop and doing it ourselves! There are not secret labs, no big electric machines and no maniacal servants or criminal brains. There is plenty of secret work, as Victor, through use of chemistry and alchemy texts, creates the "spark of life." But, he is so horrified at what he has done, that he suffers a nervous breakdown and takes months to convalesce. The creature, with no guidance and his master abandoning him, wanders the countryside as he learns to survive. He starts out noble and appreciative of nature, but also finds that Man rejects him utterly. Unlike God's creation of Adam, and Genesis' exclamation that His creation was "good", Victor's creation is found to be evil. The creature holes up in a cottage where he can spy on the people therein. There, he learns the language and the behaviors of the three people within. Here Shelly makes much about the unfairness of prison justice and the squalor being experienced by the common folk of the time. Living during the time of the Industrial Revolution, it is understandable she would make comments along the lines of destitution and that machines alone can degrade Man. Quite interesting. As the story progresses, the creature decides that he will avenge himself against Man and against his creator for making him ugly and wretched. And so the horror begins. Victor tries to make a life for himself