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Frankenstein
     

Frankenstein

3.7 245
by Mary Shelley
 

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Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by Mary Shelley. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty-one. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France. A common misconception in modern society is to refer

Overview

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by Mary Shelley. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty-one. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France. A common misconception in modern society is to refer to the monster itself as "Frankenstein", but in the novel the monster is identified via words such as "monster", "fiend", "wretch", "vile insect", "daemon", and "it"; Shelley herself called it "Adam".

Through research it can be determined the many influences the author was under during the creation of the novel. She had traveled the region in which the story takes place, and the topics of galvanism and such other occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions. Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement and is also considered to be one of the earliest examples of science fiction. It was also a warning against the expansion of modern man in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in the novel's subtitle, The Modern Prometheus. The story has had an influence across literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories and films. - from Wikipedia

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012272423
Publisher:
McCarthy Press
Publication date:
03/12/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
162 KB

Meet the Author

Mary Shelley (née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin; 30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818). She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.

Until the 1970s, Mary Shelley was known mainly for her efforts to publish Percy Shelley's works and for her novel Frankenstein, which remains widely read and has inspired many theatrical and film adaptations. Recent scholarship has yielded a more comprehensive view of Mary Shelley’s achievements. Scholars have shown increasing interest in her literary output, particularly in her novels, which include the historical novels Valperga (1823) and Perkin Warbeck (1830), the apocalyptic novel The Last Man (1826), and her final two novels, Lodore (1835) and Falkner (1837). Studies of her lesser-known works such as the travel book Rambles in Germany and Italy (1844) and the biographical articles for Dionysius Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopaedia (1829–46) support the growing view that Mary Shelley remained a political radical throughout her life. Mary Shelley's works often argue that cooperation and sympathy, particularly as practised by women in the family, were the ways to reform civil society. This view was a direct challenge to the individualistic Romantic ethos promoted by Percy Shelley and the Enlightenment political theories articulated by her father, William Godwin. - from Wikipedia

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Frankenstein 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 245 reviews.
BluWolf More than 1 year ago
This is a reprint of the original text. It is considerably different from other versions, and the sections that were altered in later editions are included in appendices for the reader's use or curiosity. The Oxford edition, like their other classics, offers many notes on the text, additional resources, a chronology of the author's life, and many explanatory notes that help the reader move right along in the text. I highly recommend this version for schools. I used this in a college class and made a much more efficient use of my time because the legwork that the editors have done to provide comments and notes saved me from having to discover allusions or references for myself or skip them altogether. It's a great story. If you chose to look more closely, this book raises a lot of questions about human interests at their core. The book, although almost two centuries old, raises questions that are still relevant today - some of which still have no definite answer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
With missing passages and characters in place of letters, this version is a ghastly abomination of Shelley's masterpiece, and more than challenging to read. There are better copies out there!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't get this copy!! There is gibberish all over the place from Google that, in my opinion, is too distracting to be overlooked. I haven't even read the book yet and just deleted my copy from my nook in search for a better version!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While this specific downloadable edition of Frankenstien I do not suggest (it lacks many important things such as discernable chapters and has the Google logo sprinkled throught in the most inconvienent places). Mary Shelly's Frankenstien is one of the few "classic" novels worth such an esteemed title, telling the tale of an unloved outcast and how a lack of compassion can turn a blank slate of a person into a vengeful monster.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The writing style is dated and can be challenging. Once I let the story grab me though, I found a story I only thought I knew. Not a "horror" story by todays standards, but a thought provoking story of science for science sake.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why are you people using the review section to pretend to be cats from warriors? The review section is supposed to be used to tell people how they thought the book they read was and give a comment that can help people decide whether they want the book, not to pretend to be cats. The book "Frankenstein" is a great classic and a good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first started reading this book I did not know what to expect. I found myself surprised at the differences between the book and the movie versions I had seen. It is a very well written book and I really liked how Mary Shelly developed the character of the frankenstien monster as an intelligent and lonely creature. The book had a much deeper message than I expected. I was expecting to read just another horror story and found myself stumbling upon a masterpiece.
Guest More than 1 year ago
we all know frankestein as the monster.in this book you understand the feelings of mother who has the heartbreak of his dead child, how she was disappointed,how hard she tried to give birth to his child who left the world she was living in.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Had to figure out lots of words due to spelling and rendering errors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I can barely read this because things arent spelt right
cheesepuff_mike More than 1 year ago
Frankenstein is a classic. A true work of literature. Any of you haters want to hate on the book, that's fine. Sure, some versions are crap. But if your lucky enough to find the true original, and understand the text, then you will experience raw, amazingly amazing Gothic horror.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Written well, but just a very depressing book. I always have to finish a book, so I forced myself to read as much of it as i could so that i could get it over with and stop feeling down from it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The version is exactly what I was looking for but it say digitized by google every other page
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't read this thinking it is a "Horror" story, that is something Hollywood turned it into. The movies are nothing like the book. The creature can learn, talk, and empathize unlike the blundering creature in the movies. If your expecting anything like the movie skip this if you want to know what the films have defiled (with the exception of the 1994 version which is as close as they get) give this a read.
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