Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus

3.5 95
by Mary Shelley
     
 

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Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel about a failed artificial life experiment that produced a monster, written by Mary Shelley. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty-one. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition,

Overview

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel about a failed artificial life experiment that produced a monster, written by Mary Shelley. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty-one. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823.

Shelley had travelled the region in which the story takes place, and the topics of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her future husband Percy Bysshe Shelley. The actual storyline was taken from a dream. Shelley was talking with three writer-colleagues, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, and John Polidori, and they decided they would have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for weeks about what her possible storyline could be, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made.

Frankenstein is infused with some elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement and is also considered to be one of the earliest examples of science fiction. Brian Aldiss has argued that it should be considered the first true science fiction story, because unlike in previous stories with fantastical elements resembling those of later science fiction, the central character "makes a deliberate decision" and "turns to modern experiments in the laboratory" to achieve fantastic results.[1] The story is partially based on Giovanni Aldini's electrical experiments on dead and (sometimes) living animals and was also a warning against the expansion of modern humans in the Industrial Revolution, alluded to in its subtitle, The Modern Prometheus. It has had a considerable influence across literature and popular culture and spawned a complete genre of horror stories and films.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013249745
Publisher:
Tempus Fugit Publishing
Publication date:
10/27/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
175 KB

Meet the Author

A self-taught native of London, Mary Wollstonecraft worked as a schoolteacher and headmistress at a school she established at Newington Green with her sister Eliza. The sisters soon became convinced that the young women they tried to teach had already been effectively enslaved by their social training in subordination to men. In Thoughts on the Education of Daughters (1787) Wollstonecraft proposed the deliberate extrapolation of Enlightenment ideals to include education for women, whose rational natures are no less capable of intellectual achievement than are those of men.

Following a period of service as a governess to Lord Kingsborough in Ireland, Wollstonecraft spent several years observing political and social developments in France, and wrote History and Moral View of the Origins and Progress of the French Revolution (1793). Her A Vindication of the Rights of Men (1790) is a spirited defense of the ideals of the Revolution against the conservative objections of Burke. Upon her return to England, she joined a radical group whose membership included Blake, Paine, Fuseli, and Wordsworth. Her first child, Fanny, was born in 1795, the daughter of American Gilbert Imlay. After his desertion, she joined the radical activist William Godwin, a long-time friend whom she married in 1797. Wollstonecraft died a few days after the birth of their daughter, Mary (who later married Percy Bysshe Shelley and wrote Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and other novels).

Wollstonecraft's lasting place in the history of philosophy rests upon A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). In this classical feminist text, she appealed to egalitarian social philosophy as the basis for the creation and preservation of equal rights and opportunities for women. The foundation of morality in all human beings, male or female, is their common possession of the faculty of reason, Wollstonecraft argued, and women must claim their equality by accepting its unemotional dictates. Excessive concern for romantic love and physical desirability, she believed, are not the natural conditions of female existence but rather the socially-imposed means by which male domination enslaves them. The posthumously-published Maria, or the Wrongs of Woman develops similar themes in a fictional setting, by showing that the plight of working women differs little from imprisonment.

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Frankenstein, Or, The Modern Prometheus 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 94 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This copy cuts off the text at the beginning of the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sections are unreadable, garbled text.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought is book for a university class, but was disappointed that it did not have the introduction that we spent a solid day discussing. otherwise, the book is great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wanted to get this for my nook and this turned out to be the best copy on here I could find and at a great price.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are looking to read Frankenstein for free on your Nook, this is the one to get. While there are a few random characters in the text, this version is by far the easiest to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tragic and beautiful
Christine Perez More than 1 year ago
frankenstein is one of the best classics ever! this free version was pretty except that it hadmany typos, but you can still get thr full meaning of the story, this version comes with another story called the ghost seeker
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This edition is very close to the 1818 original. Mary Shelley gave Victor Frankenstein a break in the 1831 rewrite. In this version Victor, and by implication you and me, is clearly responsible for his actions. The failure of the 1831 edition was to allow Victor off the hook. History has been gentle on Victor Frankenstein. Read this book and decide who is the monster.
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Last room on the first hall in the East Wing of the Estate.
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I don't recommend this version
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