Franklin and the Thunderstorm

Franklin and the Thunderstorm

4.2 16
by Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark
     
 

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When a flash of lightening sends Franklin scurrying into his shell, he refuses to come out until his friends make him laugh with their tall tales of what causes storms. When Beaver explains what really causes lightning and thunder, Franklin begins to feel much safer. Full color. 32 pp. Ages 3-7. Pub: 3/98.

Overview

When a flash of lightening sends Franklin scurrying into his shell, he refuses to come out until his friends make him laugh with their tall tales of what causes storms. When Beaver explains what really causes lightning and thunder, Franklin begins to feel much safer. Full color. 32 pp. Ages 3-7. Pub: 3/98.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Trina Heidt
While playing outdoors, Franklin and his friends are caught in the middle of a thunderstorm. Franklin, of course, is frightened and at first chance hides in his shell. The others are not as scared and they try to persuade Franklin to come out by telling him amusing stories about what makes the thunder and lightning and by finally telling him how it is really made. Franklin finally comes out of his shell feeling somewhat comforted. In the tradition of the Franklin stories, the author and creator of this lovable turtle, Paulette Bourgeois, has created another fun-to-read tale that also teaches youngsters valuable lessons.
School Library Journal
PreS-K--Franklin Tortoise's anxiety as he senses an approaching thunderstorm is not appeased by Fox, Hawk, or Beaver, all of whom find inclement weather rather exciting. They reassure their friend that there is nothing to worry about once they are inside a snug burrow. Franklin, nevertheless, retreats into his shell until they tell him that the noise from thunder is just cloud giants bowling and playing drums in the sky and that lightning is made by cloud giants turning their lights off and on. Owl, though, has a more scientific explanation that amazes them all. Soon the storm subsides and a rainbow appears. The simple story is accompanied by garishly bright illustrations of somewhat precious animals at play. Patricia Polacco's Thundercake (Philomel, 1990) addresses the subject with considerably more charm, but for additional material, where Franklin books are popular, this one might be an option.--Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590026352
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1998
Series:
Franklin
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 9.01(h) x 0.14(d)
Lexile:
370L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Franklin and the Thunderstorm


By Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark, Tara Walker

Kids Can Press

Copyright © 1998 Contextx Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-2754-1


CHAPTER 1

Franklin could count by twos and tie his shoes. He could name the months of the year and all the seasons. He could read the thermometer, and he checked the barometer every day. Franklin worried about the weather because he was afraid of storms.

One day, Franklin was supposed to play at Fox's house, but the sky was getting dark and the clouds were thick.

"Maybe I shouldn't go," Franklin said to his mother.

She looked out the window. "It probably won't rain until later," she said. "You have time to get to Fox's."

Franklin put on his boots and took the umbrella.

As Franklin hurried to Fox's house, he kept looking at the sky. The clouds moved quickly, and wind swirled dirt in the air.

Franklin felt all jumpy inside.

Fox was playing outside when Franklin arrived.

Franklin pointed nervously to the sky. "I think we should go inside, don't you?" he asked.

"Not yet." Fox grinned. "I love watching the clouds move and feeling the wind blow. It's exciting!"

"I think it's scary," said Franklin.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Franklin and the Thunderstorm by Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark, Tara Walker. Copyright © 1998 Contextx Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Kids Can Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Paulette Bourgeois is the author of more than 40 books for children, including the In My Neighborhood series and Oma's Quilt. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

Brenda Clark is best known as the illustrator of the original Franklin the Turtle series written by Paulette Bourgeois. Other popular titles she has illustrated include Sadie and the Snowman, Big Sarah's Little Boots, and the award winning, Little Fingerling. Brenda lives in Port Hope, Ontario.

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Franklin and the Thunderstorm 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
We really like Franklin so we thought this would be a good book. The story is great, as to be expected, but the formatting was less than desirable. The words are on a simple gray background and the pictures are very small. They do not correspond to the story. It's not very neat or attractive. I'm wondering if this is why B&N chose not to include a screen shot or sample. Someone commented that their audio was very low. Ours does not have a read to me feature. I would recommend saving your money and buying the actual book through scholastic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lovely pictures and nice story but the 'Read to me' feature was so quiet that it is useless. We have LOTS of these books so we know of what we speak. Didn't really get our monies worth.
RBtWBC More than 1 year ago
Franklin doesn't want to go out and play with his friends because he see's the clouds moving in the sky and a storm coming. Franklin is scared of storms, especially of the lighting and thunder that the storm brings, but his friend Fox convinces him to come over and play. When lightening strikes, thunder booms, and the power goes out Franklin hides in his shell, refusing to come out and play with his friends. But once his friends start making up fun stories about where the thunder and lightening come from Franklin finally comes out of his shell to play with his friends. Franklin and the Thunderstorm is a great read for young children. It held the attention of my six year old the entire time and my three year old up to the very end. As a parent I loved the lessons that were ingrained into the story about not playing around tall objects while it's lightening and the lesson of how lightening is created. Being scared of storms themselves I thought that this was a great book for my children to help quell their fears a little bit and added a fun twist to a potentially frightening event.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So unable to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like the book because it is funny. That the part when franlcin got skard.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IT IS AWESOME!!
z517189 More than 1 year ago
It is captivating and funny.
Anonymous 11 months ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Here.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wheres the new camp?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I will. Ill check on you guys every morning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sleeps.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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