Franklin in the Dark (25th Anniversary Edition), Franklin Says I Love You, and Franklin and the Thunderstorm

Franklin in the Dark (25th Anniversary Edition), Franklin Says I Love You, and Franklin and the Thunderstorm

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by Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark
     
 

Franklin in the Dark In the Franklin Classic Storybook that started it all, poor little Franklin has one of the most common childhood afflictions—he is afraid of the dark. This is particularly difficult for Franklin as he happens to be a turtle, and the darkness he fears is, of course, inside his own shell. Bravely, with shell in tow, he

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Overview

Franklin in the Dark In the Franklin Classic Storybook that started it all, poor little Franklin has one of the most common childhood afflictions—he is afraid of the dark. This is particularly difficult for Franklin as he happens to be a turtle, and the darkness he fears is, of course, inside his own shell. Bravely, with shell in tow, he sets forth to seek help and in the course of his travels discovers a bird who is afraid of heights, a polar bear who is afraid of the cold, and even a hydrophobic duck. In the end, Franklin discovers that everybody, even his own mother, is afraid of something, and his response to what he has learned is guaranteed to draw a smile. Franklin Says I Love You In this Franklin Classic Storybook, our hero is a very lucky turtle. He has the best friends, the best little sister, the best goldfish, and, of course, the best mother. But when he discovers that his mother’s birthday is coming up, he can’t find the best present. After giving it some serious thought, Franklin decides to do everything for his mom. On the morning of her birthday he takes her breakfast in bed, makes a brooch, draws a picture, and cuts fresh flowers from the garden! And then Franklin gives his mom a great big hug and says, “I love you”—which is, of course, the best gift of all. Franklin and the Thunderstorm In this Franklin Classic Storybook, Franklin is afraid of thunderstorms. When a storm approaches while he is playing at Fox’s house, a flash of lightning sends Franklin into his shell. He refuses to come out—even for snacks—until his friends make him laugh with their tall tales about what causes storms. And when Beaver explains what really causes thunder and lightning, Franklin begins to feel much safer.

Paulette Bourgeois worked as an occupational therapist and a print and television journalist before she began writing for children. When Franklin in the Dark, was released in 1986, it became a bestseller—and the Franklin phenomenon was born. Paulette has gone on to write over 30 Franklin stories illustrated by Brenda Clark that have been published around the world. Although Paulette is best known for the Franklin books, she has also written other children’s titles, including a number of non-fiction books and the award-winning picture book Oma’s Quilt. Paulette lives in Toronto, Ontario.  After graduating from the illustration program at Sheridan College, Brenda Clark worked as a freelance illustrator for children’s magazines and books. When she was asked to illustrate Franklin in the Dark, Brenda researched turtles and other animals in order to give Franklin and his friends as many authentic details as possible. In addition to over thirty Franklin collaborations with Paulette Bourgeois, the duo created another picture-book classic, Big Sarah’s Little Boots. Brenda Clark is also the illustrator of Sadie and the Snowman and the award-winning Little Fingerling. Brenda lives in Port Hope, Ontario.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453217252
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
05/17/2011
Series:
Franklin Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
697,858
File size:
7 MB
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

Franklin in the Dark

25th Anniversary Edition


By Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark

Kids Can Press

Copyright © 2011 by Contextx Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-1725-2


CHAPTER 1

Franklin could slide down a riverbank all by himself. He could count forwards and backwards. He could even zip zippers and button buttons. But Franklin was afraid of small, dark places and that was a problem because ...

Franklin was a turtle. He was afraid of crawling into his small, dark shell. And so, Franklin the turtle dragged his shell behind him.

Every night, Franklin's mother would take a flashlight and shine it into his shell.

"See," she would say, "there's nothing to be afraid of."

She always said that. She wasn't afraid of anything. But Franklin was sure that creepy things, slippery things, and monsters lived inside his small, dark shell.

So Franklin went looking for help. He walked until he met a duck.

"Excuse me, Duck. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," quacked the duck. "You see, I'm afraid of very deep water. Sometimes, when nobody is watching, I wear my water wings. Would my water wings help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of water."

So Franklin walked and walked until he met a lion.

"Excuse me, Lion. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," roared the lion. "You see, I'm afraid of great, loud noises. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I wear my earmuffs. Would my earmuffs help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of great, loud noises."

So Franklin walked and walked and walked until he met a bird.

"Excuse me, Bird. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," chirped the bird. "I'm afraid of flying so high that I get dizzy and fall to the ground. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I pull my parachute. Would my parachute help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of flying high and getting dizzy."

So Franklin walked and walked and walked and walked until he met a polar bear.

"Excuse me, Polar Bear. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," growled the bear. "You see, I'm afraid of freezing on icy, cold nights. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I wear my snowsuit to bed. Would my snowsuit help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of freezing on icy, cold nights."

Franklin was tired and hungry. He walked and walked and walked until he met his mother.

"Oh, Franklin. I was so afraid you were lost."

"You were afraid? I didn't know mothers were ever afraid," said Franklin.

"Well, did you find some help?" she asked.

"No. I met a duck who was afraid of deep water."

"Hmmm," she said.

"Then I met a lion who was afraid of great, loud noises."

"Uh, hmmmm," she said.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Franklin in the Dark by Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark. Copyright © 2011 by Contextx Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Kids Can Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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