Franklin in the Dark: A Classic Franklin Story (Read-Aloud Edition)

Franklin in the Dark: A Classic Franklin Story (Read-Aloud Edition)

by Paulette Bourgeois
     
 

In the Franklin Classic Storybook that started it all, poor little Franklin has one of the most common childhood afflictions-he is afraid of the dark. This is particularly difficult for Franklin as he happens to be a turtle, and the darkness he fears is, of course, inside his own shell. Bravely, with shell in tow, he sets forth to seek help and in the course of his… See more details below

  • Checkmark NOOK Kids Read to Me Books  Shop Now

Overview

In the Franklin Classic Storybook that started it all, poor little Franklin has one of the most common childhood afflictions-he is afraid of the dark. This is particularly difficult for Franklin as he happens to be a turtle, and the darkness he fears is, of course, inside his own shell. Bravely, with shell in tow, he sets forth to seek help and in the course of his travels discovers a bird who is afraid of heights, a polar bear who is afraid of the cold, and even a hydrophobic duck. In the end, Franklin discovers that everybody, even his own mother, is afraid of something, and his response to what he has learned is guaranteed to draw a smile.

This ebook features read-along narration by the author as well as music and sound effects.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453234143
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
02/29/2000
Series:
Franklin Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
17 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

Franklin in the Dark

25th Anniversary Edition


By Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark

Kids Can Press

Copyright © 2011 Contextx. Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-3414-3



CHAPTER 1

Franklin could slide down a riverbank all by himself. He could count forwards and backwards. He could even zip zippers and button buttons. But Franklin was afraid of small, dark places and that was a problem because ...

Franklin was a turtle. He was afraid of crawling into his small, dark shell. And so, Franklin the turtle dragged his shell behind him.

Every night, Franklin's mother would take a flashlight and shine it into his shell.

"See," she would say, "there's nothing to be afraid of."

She always said that. She wasn't afraid of anything. But Franklin was sure that creepy things, slippery things, and monsters lived inside his small, dark shell.

So Franklin went looking for help. He walked until he met a duck.

"Excuse me, Duck. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," quacked the duck. "You see, I'm afraid of very deep water. Sometimes, when nobody is watching, I wear my water wings. Would my water wings help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of water."

So Franklin walked and walked until he met a lion.

"Excuse me, Lion. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," roared the lion. "You see, I'm afraid of great, loud noises. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I wear my earmuffs. Would my earmuffs help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of great, loud noises."

So Franklin walked and walked and walked until he met a bird.

"Excuse me, Bird. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," chirped the bird. "I'm afraid of flying so high that I get dizzy and fall to the ground. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I pull my parachute. Would my parachute help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of flying high and getting dizzy."

So Franklin walked and walked and walked and walked until he met a polar bear.

"Excuse me, Polar Bear. I'm afraid of small, dark places and I can't crawl inside my shell. Can you help me?"

"Maybe," growled the bear. "You see, I'm afraid of freezing on icy, cold nights. Sometimes, when nobody is looking, I wear my snowsuit to bed. Would my snowsuit help you?"

"No," said Franklin. "I'm not afraid of freezing on icy, cold nights."

Franklin was tired and hungry. He walked and walked and walked until he met his mother.

"Oh, Franklin. I was so afraid you were lost."

"You were afraid? I didn't know mothers were ever afraid," said Franklin.

"Well, did you find some help?" she asked.

"No. I met a duck who was afraid of deep water."

"Hmmm," she said.

"Then I met a lion who was afraid of great, loud noises."

"Uh, hmmmm," she said.

"And then I met a bird who was afraid of falling and a polar bear who was afraid of freezing."

"Oh," she said. "They were all afraid of something."

"Hmmmm," said Franklin.

It was getting late. Franklin was very tired and very hungry. They walked and walked until they were home.

Franklin's mother gave him a cold supper and a warm hug. And then she sent him off to bed.

"Good night, dear," she said.

Well, Franklin knew what he had to do. He crawled right inside his small, dark shell. He was sure he saw creepy things, slippery things, and a monster. But he said a brave "Goodnight."

And then, when nobody was looking, Franklin the turtle turned on his night light.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Franklin in the Dark by Paulette Bourgeois, Brenda Clark. Copyright © 2011 Contextx. Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Kids Can Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >