Franny and Zooey

( 90 )

Overview

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I'll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I'm very hopeful. I love working on ...
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Overview

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I'll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I'm very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I've been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.
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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
I am one of those...for whom Salinger's work dawned as something of a revelation. I expect that further revelations are to come. The Glass saga, as he has sketched it out, potentially contains great fiction...the willingness to risk excess on behalf of one's obsessions, is what distinguishes artists from entertainers, and what makes some artists adventurers on behalf of as all.—Books of the Century, The New York Times review September, 1961
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316769495
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 5/1/2013
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 39,892
  • Lexile: 990L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.25 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

J. D. Salinger
His cloistered lifestyle and limited output have not prevented readers and writers from lionizing J. D. Salinger. With one-of-a-kind stories and the classic novel The Catcher in the Rye, he captured, with wit and poignance, a growing malaise in post-war America.

Biography

Jerome David Salinger, was born in New York City on Jan. 1, 1919, and established his reputation on the basis of a single novel, The Catcher in the Rye (1951), whose principal character, Holden Caulfield, epitomized the growing pains of a generation of high school and college students. The public attention that followed the success of the book led Salinger to move from New York to the remote hills of Cornish, New Hampshire. Before that he had published only a few short stories; one of them, "A Perfect Day for Bananafish," which appeared in The New Yorker in 1949, introduced readers to Seymour Glass, a character who subsequently figured in Franny and Zooey (1961) and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenter and Seymour: An Introduction (1963), Salinger's only other published books. Of his 35 published short stories, those which Salinger wishes to preserve are collected in Nine Stories (1953).

Author biography copyright 1993, Grolier, Inc.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Jerome David Salinger (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Cornish, New Hampshire
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 1, 1919
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      January 27, 2010
    2. Place of Death:
      Cornish, New Hampshire

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 90 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(47)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 90 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 14, 2010

    Always a Classic

    Most people know J.D. Salinger and have read "Catcher in the Rye," but "Franny and Zooey" is a true gem. This is a small book about family and religious beliefs. This book will make you laugh out loud and cry. It is witty, funny and sad. If you want to see another side of J.D. Salinger, read this. I've read it a few times over the years and always find it new and enjoyable.

    Franny comes home a changed woman, and it is discovered that she's had a breakdown. She has begun reciting the Lords Prayer over and over much to the dismay of her intellectual family. The way her parents and brother Zooey deal with this is amusing and touching. If you love a classic than this is one to read. Forget about "Catcher in the Rye," try this book that will touch your heart and your mind! After this you'll see J.D. Salinger in a whole new light.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    suprisingly lovely

    I absolutely hated Catcher in the Rye, thus was somewhat apprehensive about reading this work of Salinger. However, a freind continued to assure me I would love it, and once I picked it up, I actually did. It does have that slight hint of whining that Holden did in Catcher but otherwise, this actually has a story line and a plot and a reason for being. It's touching and makes you think and gave me a little slice of compassion. Though I will admit, you have to be in a certain mood in order to read this. Do not come looking for a happy-go-lucky, marvellous adventure, but rather a healing bit of insight for those weary with life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 17, 2013

    Franny and Zooey By J.D. Salinger 4 Stars Oh Franny and Zooey,

    Franny and Zooey By J.D. Salinger

    4 Stars

    Oh Franny and Zooey, what a family! Salinger has done it again, I love reading his work. It's a love I share with my daughter who has loved A Catcher in The Rye forever it seems. Reading this called a myriad of thoughts and emotions. We begin in the first part reading a narrative between Franny and her lackidaisical boyfriend Lane. The narrative develops and you realize Lane is wrapped up in college and the frivilous things college boys find important and not so much with what Franny is truly struggling with. She actually becomes ill and we learn she is searching for life's meaning and deeper things then her surrounding world is currently providing her.

    Next enters Zooey reading a letter in a bathtub which is uninterupted by his mother whom he refers to as the fat lady. This family is really something. They have a an older brother who taught Franny and Zooey a lot but committed suicide. The brothers and sisters were also highly intelligent with the whole family competing and devouring a lot of literature and knowledge. What effect has this had on them and how do they function around normal society when so many things are going on in their minds all the time? Franny is obsessed currently with a book called The Way of the Pilgrim which wants you to chant a religious mantra continiously to reach an mind expanding experience. Zooey is giving the task by the fat lady to sort out Franny before she becomes like her first born.

    I've read in reviews that this feels like reading a play to some and I would agree with that. A much more interesting one in my opinion then say Waiting for Godot, which I did enjoy, and Death of a Salesmen which I lothed.

    While reading this it reminded me of my household and some of the conversations I have with my son. It's randomness and has no real goal or plot but the journey is oh so interesting. I was totally fine with it, it was like I was visiting these characters for a weekend. At the end even though the conversation can go on for what seems like ever it does end and then, you rest.

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  • Posted February 7, 2013

    The story "Franny" is excellent! The second story see

    The story "Franny" is excellent! The second story seems too long and rambling.

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  • Posted April 6, 2012

    No book compares

    JD Salinger is the best author I've ever read, and this is his masterpiece. Every word is so dense with meaning that it's overwhelming sometimes, but he gets people so well that you have to keep reading. He understands how people interact and their little whims and their faults better than any author I've ever read. I also adore his approach to religion and the omnism featured in the book. I want every person to read it.

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  • Posted April 23, 2011

    I just couldn't

    get into it. The kids in this book were far to superior to relate too. Well I don't know if they were superior, but the author sure wants these people not to relate to anyone else. How can I be expected to relate to it. I felt Franny's part of the book was unnecessary as the lesson seemed to creep up in Zooey's half. At least I beleived it did because I couldn't exactly follow what that lesson was. How in the world am I suppose to take the lessons of this book in from characters I can't relate to and who seem to constantly be changing what they have to say. So why did I give it a 3 anyway. I love the way it was written! I just love older books language. I got to read describtions of objects and events and people in ways they just wouldn't be described in anymore.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Not Great...

    To start out with I think I should say I am a huge JD Salinger fan. Catcher is one of my favorite books of all time and I love his short stories that are not found in books. The other stories that involve the Glass family are excellent! However... I think Franny and Zooey is one of the most boring books I have read in a long time. I had really high expectations, so that might have to do with my rating. This is not Salinger's best. It represents his writing style (an example would be italicizing for emphasis) and general writing attitude, but it doesn't have a stimulating plot or anything. You get introduced to some members of the Glass family and that is pretty much it. Don't form your opinion of JD Salinger from this book. Read some unpublished short stories of his such as 'Both Parties Concerned' and 'Elaine'. He is great writer, this just is not his best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2008

    Catcher in the Rye, Part Deux

    Franny and Zooey is a lesser version of Catcher in the Rye. The novel has charming and touching moments, but is dominated by plodding and pretentious passages. Storyline here is thin almost to the point of non-existent, and the bulk of the novel consists of discourse on literature, religion, and relationships. What Salinger has created 'again' is an observant, detailed, and thoughtful -- yet very dull-- portrayal of a dysfunctional Manhattan family. It takes a long time to make a humane point. If you're really going to read Franny & Zooey -- which you can make it through life happily without doing so -- start it on a Saturday morning so that you'll be finished by Sunday night. You can read it and still get all your errands/and or laundry done in one weekend. You can tell friends, 'I read the other Salinger novel this weekend,' and it will be true.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2007

    I thought it'd be better...

    I honestly thought this book would be fantastic, considering the great reviews and how the book was written by J.D. Salinger...but I was highly disapointed. It didn't keep me entertained. It just felt as if I was forcing myself to read it just to finish it. I didn't enjoy this book at all. But maybe you will.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2006

    Engaging

    This novella reads more like a play than a piece of prose. The story, made up mainly of dialog between characters, is a loose commentary on religion and academia as well as an exploration of the emptiness and anxiety felt while growing up. Interesting about this story is its comparability to later novels centered on the disillusionment and misery of privileged kids (In Franny and Zooey, the Glass family were brainchildren made famous on TV). The characters aren't exactly what I would call likeable-- in fact you may find Zooey despicably cold and Franny to be simpering and pathetic. However, these characters are solid and you will find yourself uncontrollably turning the pages. Pretty riveting--a quick read that is melancholy and bittersweet.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2005

    Pretty Good

    I wanted to read this book mainly because 'The Catcher in the Rye' was so excellent. So I guess I had great expectations for this book. It wasn't the best book I have read, but I would recommended it. Salinger is an amazing writer with his candid and witty humor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2005

    So good

    Everything about the book was just amazing. Salinger is simply awesome and so are his books!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2004

    Mundanely Profound

    This book is wryly funny, incredibly intelligent, and mundanely profound. Salinger speaks of the same thoughts everyone has had, and brings to a very intellectual light the crises of growing up. You don't have to like the characters to empathize with them, and you don't have to be riveted by some superficial plot to stay interested. The sheer depth of symbolism and nuances of the Glass' 'esoteric family language' are enough to occupy a thinking mind for weeks at a time. Personally, 'Catcher' was ruined for me by a bad teacher, but 'Franny and Zooey' more than redeems Salinger in my eyes. In many ways it is harder to connect with the characters, but once that connection is made, you realize that the book has nearly infinite layers of meaning.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2004

    They could be Holden's cousins

    Franny and Zooey is excellent. Even though the stories only take place in a few hours, the characters are extremely well-developed. This is my favorite kind of novel- the one where I get to know the characters so well. The dialogue, facial expressions, and pauses are so realistic, it's like one is right there with the characters in the room, seeing them act out this 'prose home movie,' as Buddy refers to it. It was excellent. Another interesting thing to me was how much the FRANNY part reminded me of THE BELL JAR- The Bell Jar is like a book that Franny would write about herself, because she's very similar in some ways to Sylvia Plath.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2004

    Franny and Zooey

    Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger would be good for a person to read because of the depth you get in understanding of the personalities Salinger deals with. You become acquainted with their emotions, their desires, and their close family ties. You grasp on appreciation for their intellectual pursuits. When Buddy realized Zooey might not make it in theatre work, he encouraged him to prepare himself for more in college. Zooey helps Franny through her breakdown and helps her with her religious beliefs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2003

    Precious.

    Salinger's construction of Franny and Zooey -- characters whose vivid personalities and attitudes actually resonate -- through exquisitely chosen details shows a capacity for writing that is hard to imagine from a linear point-of-view. The fact that he can bring out mannerisms and insights into people that might as well be a well-rendered portrait of someone you know well, and still are as true today as they were 50 years ago, to me speaks as much to a brilliant insight into culture and people as it does the ability to write fiction. The only possible thing that might have made me want to stop turning the pages is that at some point the story is almost too perfect and cute, like an acting exercise, I just wanted to read the whole thesis and not just revel in his sublime little portrait.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2003

    Franny and Zooey

    Franny and Zooey is an amazing and literate book, filled with wit and sophistication I've rarely seen in many books. Salinger is such a connoisseur of the english language. His prose is poignant and endearing, but harsh and revealing at the same time. He harnesses the ability to sound sarcastic and inadvertently judgemental without being pretentious or facetious. This book is extremely sanctimonious, but the religious paradigms are superceded by his amazing character development. These characters seem extremely down to earth, yet still possess the quality to be seen as role models. I loved this book so much, and I am extremely glad I chose it for summer reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2003

    a brilliant and unique novel

    This novel consists of two parts, Franny and Zooey. In Franny, a disillusioned college girl, Franny, comes back to NY city on a vacation and goes on a date w/ her boyfriend, Lane. She eats nothing, is disturbed by a religious novel that she recently read, and expresses her discontent with life. In Zooey, her brother Zooey helps her to resolve the crisis at home. Although each part of the novel takes place within a few hours, the characters are extremely well developed are portrayed with such depth and realism that they must be from Salinger's life. In addition, the dialog is stirring and emotionaly charged as the charaters debate various philosophical points and express differing opinions on life. The novel is short, fast moving, and dynamic. It lacks the standard plot structure and is presented as a series of dialogs, in which the characters debate everything from religion to art, and most especially the meaning of life. If in the Catcher in the Rye Salinger is a confused but brilliant youth seeking answers and a sense of purpose, then in Franny and Zooey he has matured into a philosophical adult with a developed and astute view on life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2003

    next book pls

    i loved catcher in the rye, so i had high hopes for this book. however, F&Z did not live up to my expectations. when i'm reading a good book, it takes me a while to finish it because i try to relish the story. however, with this book, i was done just as soon as i picked. this is because i just wanted to put it down..and move on to a better one. nevertheless, i was able to appreciate the theology behind the story. since i have taken world religion in university, i had some ideas on the different religions explored in the book. but for people who haven't learned about hinduism or budhism ... the words upanishads, bodhisatvas, buddha-truth, and etc won't have meaning to you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2003

    Great book!

    I loved, loved, loved Franny and Zooey! It's a great book. I loved all the characters; Franny, Zooey, and even Lane! It's an awesome book. I highly recommend it!

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