Franny and Zooey

Franny and Zooey

4.1 93
by J. D. Salinger
     
 

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The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or

Overview

The author writes: FRANNY came out in The New Yorker in 1955, and was swiftly followed, in 1957 by ZOOEY. Both stories are early, critical entries in a narrative series I'm doing about a family of settlers in twentieth-century New York, the Glasses. It is a long-term project, patently an ambiguous one, and there is a real-enough danger, I suppose that sooner or later I'll bog down, perhaps disappear entirely, in my own methods, locutions, and mannerisms. On the whole, though, I'm very hopeful. I love working on these Glass stories, I've been waiting for them most of my life, and I think I have fairly decent, monomaniacal plans to finish them with due care and all-available skill.

Editorial Reviews

New York Times
I am one of those...for whom Salinger's work dawned as something of a revelation. I expect that further revelations are to come. The Glass saga, as he has sketched it out, potentially contains great fiction...the willingness to risk excess on behalf of one's obsessions, is what distinguishes artists from entertainers, and what makes some artists adventurers on behalf of as all.—Books of the Century, The New York Times review September, 1961

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316769020
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
05/01/2013
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
325,158
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
16 - 18 Years

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Franny and Zooey 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 93 reviews.
ArdentReader More than 1 year ago
Most people know J.D. Salinger and have read "Catcher in the Rye," but "Franny and Zooey" is a true gem. This is a small book about family and religious beliefs. This book will make you laugh out loud and cry. It is witty, funny and sad. If you want to see another side of J.D. Salinger, read this. I've read it a few times over the years and always find it new and enjoyable. Franny comes home a changed woman, and it is discovered that she's had a breakdown. She has begun reciting the Lords Prayer over and over much to the dismay of her intellectual family. The way her parents and brother Zooey deal with this is amusing and touching. If you love a classic than this is one to read. Forget about "Catcher in the Rye," try this book that will touch your heart and your mind! After this you'll see J.D. Salinger in a whole new light.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I absolutely hated Catcher in the Rye, thus was somewhat apprehensive about reading this work of Salinger. However, a freind continued to assure me I would love it, and once I picked it up, I actually did. It does have that slight hint of whining that Holden did in Catcher but otherwise, this actually has a story line and a plot and a reason for being. It's touching and makes you think and gave me a little slice of compassion. Though I will admit, you have to be in a certain mood in order to read this. Do not come looking for a happy-go-lucky, marvellous adventure, but rather a healing bit of insight for those weary with life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Franny and Zooey A Portrait of an Era  By: AbbyD J. D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey is a novel made up of two stories that take place in two different settings and convey two different ideas. The first story Franny, set in the late 1950s, is about a young woman who goes to visit her boyfriend Lana. She meets him at the train station and the two go to a restaurant. While Franny and Lane are conversing with each other, Salinger cleverly establishes the idea that they are not really communicating. Franny seems preoccupied and nervous. When she tells Lane about a book that she has been reading titled The Way of the Pilgrim, she gets carried away. She speaks for a long time about how she finds the main idea of the book astonishing. The book talks about how praying has its own quality and power of its own. She says that praying requires repetition until it becomes part of your heartbeat; you pray incessantly, and you achieve a spiritual state of being. All the while Lane is barley paying attention and responds dismissively. Franny’s growing interest in spirituality seems worrisome to Lane who is more of the rational and competitive kind. Franny also talks about how she hates egotistical people, and how she hates the feeling of her competing with everyone else. She doesn’t like how everyone in society is working so hard to be like everyone else. The story ends with Franny’s collapse at the restaurant. When she wakes up Lane goes to catch a cab and the reader is left with Franny repeating a word as if in a prayer. The second story Zooey, is told by a narrator who presents himself as the older brother of Franny and Zooey. The story sheds light on the occurrences of the first story. Franny comes home to the family’s New York City apartment where she experiences a breakdown. We realize that Franny’s interest in spirituality comes from the influence of her older brothers who thought that belief is better than knowledge. Franny criticizes the people around her including her college professors and peers. She wants to quite college and doesn’t really see the point of studying. To help Franny out of her emotional crisis Zooey uses the phone to impersonate their older brother Buddy (the narrator). He tells her that she should love the world around her, love people, no matter if they are stupid, egotistical, bad looking, or bad hearted, because human beings and spirituality are equally deserving of love. The final message is that spirituality is achieved through love. There isn’t much plot in J. D Salinger’s stories but his descriptive writing lets the reader into the emotional world of his characters. In the very short story Franny the characters are amazingly developed. The reader learns about their beliefs, their background, their thoughts, their physical appearance, their family life, etc. The quality of this book and the story telling is exceptional. J. D. Salinger successfully conveyed the theme of spirituality and the meaning of love. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AbbyD J. D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey is a novel made up of two stories that take place in two different settings and convey two different ideas. The first story Franny, set in the late 1950s, is about a young woman who goes to visit her boyfriend Lana. She meets him at the train station and the two go to a restaurant. While Franny and Lane are conversing with each other, Salinger cleverly establishes the idea that they are not really communicating. Franny seems preoccupied and nervous. When she tells Lane about a book that she has been reading titled The Way of the Pilgrim, she gets carried away. She speaks for a long time about how she finds the main idea of the book astonishing. The book talks about how praying has its own quality and power of its own. She says that praying requires repetition until it becomes part of your heartbeat; you pray incessantly, and you achieve a spiritual state of being. All the while Lane is barley paying attention and responds dismissively. Franny’s growing interest in spirituality seems worrisome to Lane who is more of the rational and competitive kind. Franny also talks about how she hates egotistical people, and how she hates the feeling of her competing with everyone else. She doesn’t like how everyone in society is working so hard to be like everyone else. The story ends with Franny’s collapse at the restaurant. When she wakes up Lane goes to catch a cab and the reader is left with Franny repeating a word as if in a prayer. The second story Zooey, is told by a narrator who presents himself as the older brother of Franny and Zooey. The story sheds light on the occurrences of the first story. Franny comes home to the family’s New York City apartment where she experiences a breakdown. We realize that Franny’s interest in spirituality comes from the influence of her older brothers who thought that belief is better than knowledge. Franny criticizes the people around her including her college professors and peers. She wants to quite college and doesn’t really see the point of studying. To help Franny out of her emotional crisis Zooey uses the phone to impersonate their older brother Buddy (the narrator). He tells her that she should love the world around her, love people, no matter if they are stupid, egotistical, bad looking, or bad hearted, because human beings and spirituality are equally deserving of love. The final message is that spirituality is achieved through love. There isn’t much plot in J. D Salinger’s stories but his descriptive writing lets the reader into the emotional world of his characters. In the very short story Franny the characters are amazingly developed. The reader learns about their beliefs, their background, their thoughts, their physical appearance, their family life, etc. The quality of this book and the story telling is exceptional. J. D. Salinger successfully conveyed the theme of spirituality and the meaning of love. 
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kross1 More than 1 year ago
Great Author, Average Book So, I really love J.D. Salinger, but this book just didn't cut it for me. I felt a loss of connection and I really couldn't relate to what he was saying. I had a hard time interpretting it and that could be because all of th Salinger books I have read were taught in class, and I actually found his books more enjoyable when explained in class by my english teacher, but maybe that's just me. The mood of Salinger;s writing style can be a bit too depressing for me, especially Franny and Zooey. Maybe in a year or two from now I will pick it up again, and see if I can relate to it a bit more. I'm still giving it three stars because Salinger is an American Classic and after all he really is a talented author.
mgoodrich718 More than 1 year ago
Franny and Zooey By J.D. Salinger 4 Stars Oh Franny and Zooey, what a family! Salinger has done it again, I love reading his work. It's a love I share with my daughter who has loved A Catcher in The Rye forever it seems. Reading this called a myriad of thoughts and emotions. We begin in the first part reading a narrative between Franny and her lackidaisical boyfriend Lane. The narrative develops and you realize Lane is wrapped up in college and the frivilous things college boys find important and not so much with what Franny is truly struggling with. She actually becomes ill and we learn she is searching for life's meaning and deeper things then her surrounding world is currently providing her. Next enters Zooey reading a letter in a bathtub which is uninterupted by his mother whom he refers to as the fat lady. This family is really something. They have a an older brother who taught Franny and Zooey a lot but committed suicide. The brothers and sisters were also highly intelligent with the whole family competing and devouring a lot of literature and knowledge. What effect has this had on them and how do they function around normal society when so many things are going on in their minds all the time? Franny is obsessed currently with a book called The Way of the Pilgrim which wants you to chant a religious mantra continiously to reach an mind expanding experience. Zooey is giving the task by the fat lady to sort out Franny before she becomes like her first born. I've read in reviews that this feels like reading a play to some and I would agree with that. A much more interesting one in my opinion then say Waiting for Godot, which I did enjoy, and Death of a Salesmen which I lothed. While reading this it reminded me of my household and some of the conversations I have with my son. It's randomness and has no real goal or plot but the journey is oh so interesting. I was totally fine with it, it was like I was visiting these characters for a weekend. At the end even though the conversation can go on for what seems like ever it does end and then, you rest.
Alfredo17 More than 1 year ago
The story "Franny" is excellent! The second story seems too long and rambling.
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KristenAnna More than 1 year ago
JD Salinger is the best author I've ever read, and this is his masterpiece. Every word is so dense with meaning that it's overwhelming sometimes, but he gets people so well that you have to keep reading. He understands how people interact and their little whims and their faults better than any author I've ever read. I also adore his approach to religion and the omnism featured in the book. I want every person to read it.
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Petrula More than 1 year ago
Salinger's "Franny & Zooey" is about prayer, can you believe it! It's about one of the essential questions for many folks who wonder about prayer, one way or another. You don't have to be "religious" or "pious" or a theologan. You do need to wonder, however -- about God a bit, and that guy Jesus, and why we would want to pray, and -- and that's the big one -- HOW. How exactly, without ceasing. HUH? We have all wondered about that one, I reckon -- how on Earth are we supposed to do that, pray without ceasing? Who has the goddamn TIME for that??? Besides, let's be honest, it sounds boring. The book certainly is no thriller, at least not the way we usually get thrilled. Salinger liked to play with language, of course. Modern language -- back in the fifties and sixties, anyway. He started it with The Catcher in the Rye, and all his books have kept that style alive. And the ending here is absolutely lovely -- if you are not a church-goer but you do have Faith (imagine that!), it does give you the best goose bumps. What a great and odd way to get that message across -- what the old Meaning of Life is and of family, and the reason to do things, even shine our shoes. It's the ultimate Golden Rule message, translated into rather modern language and presented without embarrassment. The freakin' spiritual reason for shining our shoes, folks. Or doing the dishes. Or caring about others, old, young, skinny, fat, rich or poor. The simple antidote to nihilism or powertripping. The old Divine Spark cannot get lost -- that's it in a nutshell. A quick read, too, if you let yourself drop into the lingo. Enjoy!
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