×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Fred Schneider & the Shake Society
     

Fred Schneider & the Shake Society

by Fred Schneider
 

See All Formats & Editions

Fred Schneider's first solo turn away from the B-52's was definitely a product of its time. For all of his band's new wave icon status, the B-52's weren't a synth rock group as such, but that's what more or less ended up backing him here, mostly thanks to one John Coté and his sometimes serviceable but unremarkable arrangements. Happily, Coté is content to either try

Overview

Fred Schneider's first solo turn away from the B-52's was definitely a product of its time. For all of his band's new wave icon status, the B-52's weren't a synth rock group as such, but that's what more or less ended up backing him here, mostly thanks to one John Coté and his sometimes serviceable but unremarkable arrangements. Happily, Coté is content to either try to ape the B-52's or just let Schneider do his thing when he himself has little to offer, and more often than not the result is sometimes fine if not collectively spectacular. Perhaps wisely enough, the lead song and single from the album was not only the best but one of the most B-52's-like, "Monster." With Kate Pierson turning in one of several guest performances and Schneider clearly having deadpan fun with lines like "There's a monster in my pants and it does a nasty dance," it's hard to resist. "Summer in Hell" is another winner, and while Pierson reappears it's much more Schneider and Coté's show, a solid slice of ersatz B-52's merriment about how all the fun people ended up in the fiery regions. When it's just Schneider, Coté, and assorted others (including, in an inspired choice that just doesn't pan out for much, co-producer Bernie Worrell), things are often far less interesting, and more than once Schneider's trademark giddiness and odd imagery are the only things going for it. Remove those and songs like "Cut the Concrete" -- down to a really worthless ending guitar solo that seems borrowed from a bad mid-'80s cop drama -- and "This Planet's a Mess" could be trashed without anyone feeling any loss. Great as an EP, flawed as a full-length.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/29/2008
Label:
Rhino Encore
UPC:
0081227991692
catalogNumber:
26592

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Fred Schneider   Primary Artist,Vocals,Background Vocals
Patti LaBelle   Vocals
Bernie Worrell   Synthesizer,Keyboards,Background Vocals,Clavinet,Vocoder,Synthesizer Bass
B.J. Nelson   Background Vocals
Ronnie Ardito   Guitar,Keyboards,Background Vocals
Eluriel Tinker Barfield   Bass,Drums
Tinker Barfield   Bass
Tom Beckerman   Guitar,Bass Guitar,Synthesizer Bass
John Coté   Synthesizer,Guitar,Bass Guitar,Background Vocals,Multi Instruments,fairlight,Synthesizer Bass
Ronald Drayton   Guitar
Trevor Gayle   Drums,Kettle Drums
Leslie Ming   Drums
Kate Pierson   Background Vocals
Steve Scales   Percussion,Cabasa
Billy Amendola   Drums
Geoffrey Armes   Percussion
Richard Beau   Percussion
Boonga   Background Vocals
Shailah Edmonds   Background Vocals
Lisa Lubitz   Background Vocals
Lamar Mitchell   Vocoder
Robert Molnar   Background Vocals
Ronnie Drayton   Guitar
Chris Schneider   Background Vocals
Bernie   Background Vocals
Hellions   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Richard Barone   Songwriter
Fred Schneider   Arranger,Producer
Bernie Worrell   Arranger,Producer
Ronnie Ardito   Arranger,Composer,drum programming
Tinker Barfield   Drum Fills
Tom Beckerman   drum programming
John Coté   Arranger,drum programming,Instrumentation
Steve Hall   Remixing
Butch Jones   Arranger,Engineer
Leslie Ming   Drum Fills
Billy Amendola   Drum Fills
Richard Beau   Arranger,Composer
Robert Molnar   Programming,drum programming,Cover Photo
Margo Chase   Cover Design
Deborah Norcross   Art Direction
Michael Vail Brum   Remixing

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews