The Freddie Stories by Lynda Barry, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Freddie Stories

The Freddie Stories

by Lynda Barry
     
 

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THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF TROUBLED ADOLESCENTS FROM BARRY'S ACCLAIMED COMIC

The Freddie Stories traces a year in the life of Freddie, the youngest member of the dysfunctional Mullen family. These four-panel entries—each representing an episode in the life of Freddie—bring to life adolescence, pimples and all. No matter what happens,

Overview

THE TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS OF TROUBLED ADOLESCENTS FROM BARRY'S ACCLAIMED COMIC

The Freddie Stories traces a year in the life of Freddie, the youngest member of the dysfunctional Mullen family. These four-panel entries—each representing an episode in the life of Freddie—bring to life adolescence, pimples and all. No matter what happens, it all seems to go wrong for Freddie—he's set up as an arsonist, mercilessly teased in school, and bossed around by classmates. With consummate skill, Lynda Barry writes about the cruelty of children at this most vulnerable age when the friends they make and the paths they choose can forever change their lives. In The Freddie Stories every word of dialogue, every piece of narration, and every dark line evokes adolescent angst. These short, moving stories are collected from Barry's beloved Ernie Pook's Comeek, which was serialized across North America for two decades. Re-packaged here with a brand-new afterword from Lynda Barry, The Freddie Stories is an adult tale about just how hard it is to be a teenager, and it's classic Barry work—poignant, insightful, and true.

Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post - Douglas Wolk
What keeps The Freddie Stories from being unbearably grim is Freddie's irrepressible voice, a cartwheeling, goofy burble that delights in its own verve even in his darkest moments. His narrative captions take up half or more of each panel. That doesn't leave much room for Barry's gawky, off-center characters and chicken-scratch flourishes, but she packs those tiny spaces with dense imagery…
From the Publisher

“Barry remains the comics' greatest genius at depicting childhood...Bullied at school and misunderstood or simply ignored by the kids' irascible, chain-smoking mother, Freddie nevertheless possesses an inner life of great beauty and terror, whose heights and depths Barry manages to encompass without ever abandoning the authentic voice of childhood. Much of what Freddie goes through is pretty rough, but as ever in Barry's work, the transcendent power of the imagination awaits.” —Salon.com's Unforgettable Graphic Novels of 2013
Library Journal
YA-Barry's comic strip has been running in hip weeklies for years. Marlys, her teenaged sister Maybonne, and their sappy little brother Freddie have also been featured in previous book-length tales that have a readership among both the strip readers and those who know Barry's work only in its longer form. Both groups will appreciate The Freddie Stories, featuring the eponymous weird little brother-who isn't really so much weird as he is the unfortunate low man on the totem pole at home, school, and in his neighborhood. In the cartoonist's customary style, the artwork is quivery and stuffed with detail, while the dialogue is hyperrealistic, replete with "ums" and name-calling. Freddie's teacher and mother both show their dislike of the poor underdog who finds himself needing to foil a peer's plan to burn down the neighborhood. Subplots about Marlys and Maybonne make this a true novel rather than a long short story. Freddie's life isn't any prettier than Barry's art, but both are substantial and compelling.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Syndicated in many alternative papers, Barry has collected nine volumes of her deliberately childlike comics and has also published a first novel, The Good Times Are Killing Me (not seen). Like the Simpsons' creator, Matt Groening, Barry supports her crude line drawings with her smart text, which is always hand-lettered above the picture, and often overwhelms her ugly-beautiful illustrations. Here, she gives voice to Freddie, the troubled brother of Marlys and Maybonne, who were the focus of previous volumes. Though the individual stories-each six or so frames, with one two-frame panel per page-begin innocently enough, Barry's poignant tales soon turn quite dark. Dismissed as "Freddie the Fag" by his older cousin Arnold, Freddie follows Arnold and his friend Jim-Jimmy-Jim in a demented plot with a violent end. Things turn even worse: Freddie hallucinates everyone as talking skulls, and his only friend at school first engages him in pubescent homosexuality, then dies from choking. Freddie retreats further into weirdness and is placed in special ed classes where his new friend, "Spaz-Eyes Gigi," also disappoints him. "El Fagtastico," as Freddie calls himself, grows stranger over time, and Barry narrates his sad history with visual sympathy and allows Freddie to speak for his own sorry self. A surprisingly moving, visually engaging collection. .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770460904
Publisher:
Drawn & Quarterly
Publication date:
01/22/2013
Pages:
72
Sales rank:
745,777
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 6.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author


Lynda Barry was born in Wisconsin in 1956, and later studied at Evergreen State College. She has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator, and teacher and found they are very much alike.

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