Frederica

Frederica

4.7 42
by Georgette Heyer
     
 

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In Frederica, Georgette Heyer explores the difficulties of a woman of the Regency era operating without the patronage and protection of a man.

A country beauty and a very capable young woman, Frederica is burdened with the responsibilities of being head of her family, leaving her little time to think of herself and her own future. When she brings her brood

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Overview

In Frederica, Georgette Heyer explores the difficulties of a woman of the Regency era operating without the patronage and protection of a man.

A country beauty and a very capable young woman, Frederica is burdened with the responsibilities of being head of her family, leaving her little time to think of herself and her own future. When she brings her brood to London to find a husband for her stunningly beautiful younger sister, she naturally expects the patronage of their guardian, the Marquis of Alverstoke, who is, however, too bored and cynical to be bothered. But when Frederica's younger brother's obsession with such scientific innovations as ironworks and balloon flight leads to a devastating accident, the Marquis can no longer ignore his charges ...

Editorial Reviews

A Blog of Books
The characters can't help but be loveable - from the sister who is beautiful and can't tell anyone no, to the brother who can't help but be ernest, to the heroine herself. It all keeps you coming back for more.
— Nicole Heffernan
Books and Needlepoint
[F]ull of family, humor, society do's and don'ts and of course, romance.

— Kristi Herbrand

Love Romance Passion
The novel is humorous, light-hearted... a nice, comfortable way to get your Austen-fix.
— Keira Gillet
Wendi's Book Corner
This is a great book that explores both the relationships of the characters, and the Regency era itself. Fun, entertaining, enthralling!
— Wendi Barker
Lesa's Book Critiques
[A] fun, charming book... Frederica is a keeper, going on my bookshelf.
— Lesa Holstine
Once Upon a Romance
Frederica is a powerful Regency romance, that every fan of the genre should read.
— Marlene
At Home with Books
Frederica is a fun, witty and intelligent read... I highly recommend this novel to anyone who likes a good historical romance.
— Alyce Reese
The Book Smugglers
Verdict: delightful repartee, a good Hero and crazy kids as secondary characters = win.
— Ana
The Bookworm 07
I had previously posted on my blog that I was looking for that next favorite book, and I found it here with Frederica. This book is funny, charming and full of interesting characters.
— Naida Milenkovic
Genre Reviews
There was a playful, light-hearted feel to this book that, along with the engaging characters, totally charmed me.
— Deborah White
Becky's Book Blog
If the modern day romance novel is the wonder bread of the literary world, Georgette Heyer would offer readers the fiber-heavy complexity of whole grains.
— Rebecca Laney
Chris' Book-a-Rama
I liked Frederica a lot, especially the banter between Frederica and Alverstone...
— Christina Maclean
Jane Austen's World
The novel ends on a most satisfying note, and I can think of no better way of spending a chilly winter evening - wrapped in a down comforter with my pooch sleeping by my side - than reading this gem of a book.
— Vic Sandborn
Booking Mama
I think Ms. Heyer's writing is just so smart and witty... I highly recommend FREDERICA if you are looking for a good summer read. It is a very entertaining story with lots of romance.
— Julie Peterson
Library Journal
05/15/2014
Frederica Meriville, considering herself far too old at the advanced age of 24 to ever wed, wants nothing more than for her beautiful younger sister to make a good match. To that end, she heads to London where she convinces her very distant relation, Lord Alverstoke, to take an interest in her family. But Alverstoke finds his interest fixed on the witty and lovely Frederica. VERDICT This is one of the most charming of all of Heyer's delightful Regency romances; the mood is particularly summery with hot-air balloon launches, mischievous younger brothers, and a rambunctious hound of mixed pedigree.
From the Publisher
"The novel ends on a most satisfying note, and I can think of no better way of spending a chilly winter evening - wrapped in a down comforter with my pooch sleeping by my side - than reading this gem of a book." - Jane Austen's World

"There was a playful, light-hearted feel to this book that, along with the engaging characters, totally charmed me." - Genre Reviews

" If the modern day romance novel is the wonder bread of the literary world, Georgette Heyer would offer readers the fiber-heavy complexity of whole grains." - Becky's Book Blog

"I think Ms. Heyer's writing is just so smart and witty... I highly recommend FREDERICA if you are looking for a good summer read. It is a very entertaining story with lots of romance." - Booking Mama

"I liked Frederica a lot, especially the banter between Frederica and Alverstone... " - Chris' Book-a-Rama

"I had previously posted on my blog that I was looking for that next favorite book, and I found it here with Frederica. This book is funny, charming and full of interesting characters. " - The Bookworm 07

"Frederica is a fun, witty and intelligent read... I highly recommend this novel to anyone who likes a good historical romance." - At Home with Books

"Verdict: delightful repartee, a good Hero and crazy kids as secondary characters = win. " - The Book Smugglers

"Frederica is a powerful Regency romance, that every fan of the genre should read. " - Once Upon a Romance

"[A] fun, charming book... Frederica is a keeper, going on my bookshelf." - Lesa's Book Critiques

"This is a great book that explores both the relationships of the characters, and the Regency era itself. Fun, entertaining, enthralling!" - Wendi's Book Corner

"The novel is humorous, light-hearted... a nice, comfortable way to get your Austen-fix." - Love Romance Passion

"[F]ull of family, humor, society do's and don'ts and of course, romance." - Books and Needlepoint

"The characters can't help but be loveable - from the sister who is beautiful and can't tell anyone no, to the brother who can't help but be ernest, to the heroine herself. It all keeps you coming back for more." - A Blog of Books

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402230233
Publisher:
Sourcebooks, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
34,086
File size:
1 MB

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Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Chapter One of Frederica

Not more than five days after she had dispatched an urgent missive to her brother, the Most Honourable the Marquis of Alverstoke, requesting him to visit her at his earliest convenience, the widowed Lady Buxted was relieved to learn from her youngest daughter that Uncle Vernon had just driven up to the house, wearing a coat with dozens of capes, and looking as fine as fivepence. 'In a smart new curricle, too, Mama, and everything prime about him!' declared Miss Kitty, flattening her nose against the window-pane in her effort to squint down into the street. 'He is the most tremendous swell, isn't he, Mama?'

Lady Buxted responded in repressive accents, desiring her not to use expressions unbefitting a lady of quality, and dismissing her to the schoolroom.

Lady Buxted was not one of her brother's admirers; and the intelligence that he had driven himself to Grosvenor Place in his curricle did nothing to advance him in her good graces. It was a fine spring morning, but a sharp wind was blowing, and no one who knew him could suppose that the Marquis would keep his high-bred horses waiting for more than a few minutes. This did not augur well for the scheme she had in mind - not, as she had bitterly observed to her elder sister, that she cherished any but the gloomiest expectations, Alverstoke being, without exception, the most selfish, disobliging creature alive.

To this proposition, Lady Jevington, a commanding matron on the shady side of forty, lent only qualified support. She might (and did) think her only brother selfish and disobliging, but she could perceive no reason why he should be expected to do more for Louisa than for herself. As for Louisa's two sons and three daughters, Lady Jevington found herself unable to blame Alverstoke for taking no interest in any of them. It was really impossible to be interested in such commonplace children. That he was equally uninterested in her own offspring did, however, argue a selfish disposition. Anyone would have supposed that a bachelor who was not only of the first stare but who was also possessed of considerable wealth would have been only too glad to have sponsored such a promising nephew as her beloved Gregory into the select circle which he himself adorned, and to have exerted himself to have brought dear Anna into fashion. That Anna had become eligibly betrothed without the least assistance from him in no way mitigated her ladyship's resentment; and although she admitted the justice of her unfashionable lord's reminder that she disapproved of the frippery set to which Alverstoke belonged, and had frequently expressed the hope that Gregory would never allow himself to be drawn into it, she still could not forgive Alverstoke for having made no attempt to do so. She said that she wouldn't have cared a rush if she had not good reason to suppose that Alverstoke had not only purchased a cornetcy in the Life Guards for his young cousin and heir, but made him a handsome allowance into the bargain. To which Lord Jevington replied that as he was very well able to provide for his son, who, in any event, had no claim whatsoever upon his uncle, he could only give Alverstoke credit for having enough good sense to refrain from making an offer of monetary assistance which would have been deeply resented by the Honourable Gregory Sandridge's parents. This was perfectly true; but still Lady Jevington felt that if Alverstoke had had a grain of proper feeling he would not have singled out for his favour a mere cousin instead of his eldest nephew. She also felt that in a better organised state of society his eldest sister's son, rather than a removed cousin, would have been his heir.

Without wishing to see Gregory so unfairly elevated, Lady Buxted was in general agreement with her sister, both ladies being united in contempt of Mr Endymion Dauntry, whom they stigmatised as a perfect block. But whether their enmity towards this blameless young man arose from their dislike of his widowed mama, or from his handsome countenance and magnificent physique, which cast both Gregory Sandridge and young Lord Buxted into the shade, was a question no one cared to ask.

Whatever might have been the reason, his two elder sisters were convinced that no unworthier heir to Alverstoke's dignities than Endymion could have been found; and neither had spared any pains to introduce to her brother's notice all the prettiest and most eligible damsels who were fired off, year after year, into the ton.

But Alverstoke's besetting sin was a tendency to become rapidly bored. It had vanquished his sisters; for although neither of them could suppose, reviewing the numerous dazzling barques of frailty who had lived under his protection, that he was impervious to feminine charms, neither was so muttonheaded as to indulge optimism very far when he seemed to be developing a tendre for some diamond of birth, beauty, and fortune, thrust under his nose by one or other of his sisters. He was perfectly capable of making the lady the object of his gallantry for a few weeks, and then of veering off at a tangent, forgetting her very existence. When it was borne in upon his sisters that prudent parents looked askance at him, and that he was generally thought to be dangerous, they abandoned their attempts to provide him with a wife, devoting their energies instead to the easier task of deploring his indolence, condemning his selfishness, and scolding him for any of his moral aberrations which came to their ears. Only his youngest sister refrained; but as she had refused several flattering offers for her hand, and had married, to please herself, a mere country gentleman, and rarely visited the Metropolis, she was considered by her two sisters to be a negligible quantity. If they spoke of her, which they seldom did, it was as Poor Eliza; and although they knew that Alverstoke preferred her to themselves it entered neither of their heads to solicit her help in the matter of his marriage. Had it done so they would have dismissed the idea, in the well-founded belief that no one had ever, since he grew to manhood, exercised the smallest influence over him.

It was not to read him a lecture that Lady Buxted had on this occasion commanded him to visit her: indeed, she had resolved to say nothing that could set up his back. But as she awaited his entrance the hope which (despite experience) had entered her breast upon hearing of his arrival was succeeded by the reflection that it was just like him to have allowed five days to elapse before putting himself to the trouble of answering a summons, which, for anything he knew, might have been of the utmost urgency. It was with difficulty that she schooled her countenance to an expression of affectionate welcome; and with still more difficulty that she infused cordiality into her voice when he strolled, unannounced, into the room. That was just like him too: the sort of casual behaviour which her ladyship, a high stickler, much deplored, seeing no reason why he should treat her house as if it were his own.

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