Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass

by Booker T. Washington
     
 

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A sympathetic study by the great teacher and leader of a career which was identified with the race problem in the period of revolution and liberation. The sketch reveals Douglass as the personification of the historical events that marked the transistion from slavery to citizenship. This title is cited and recommended by Books for College Libraries; Harvard Guide to

Overview

A sympathetic study by the great teacher and leader of a career which was identified with the race problem in the period of revolution and liberation. The sketch reveals Douglass as the personification of the historical events that marked the transistion from slavery to citizenship. This title is cited and recommended by Books for College Libraries; Harvard Guide to American History.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780837119786
Publisher:
Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
02/28/1970
Series:
History - United States Series
Pages:
365

Meet the Author

Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 - November 14, 1915) was an American political leader, educator, orator and author. He was the dominant figure in the African American community in the United States from 1890 to 1915. Representing the last generation of black leaders born in slavery, and speaking for those blacks who had remained in the New South in an uneasy modus vivendi with the white southerners, Washington was able throughout the final 25 years of his life to maintain his standing as the black leader because of the sponsorship of powerful whites, substantial support within the black community, his ability to raise educational funds from both groups, and his skillful accommodation to the social realities of the age of segregation.[1]

Washington was born into slavery to a white father and a slave mother in a rural area in southwestern Virginia. After emancipation, he worked in West Virginia in a variety of manual labor jobs before making his way to Hampton Roads seeking an education. He worked his way through Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) and attended college at Wayland Seminary. After returning to Hampton as a teacher, in 1881 he was named as the first leader of the new Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

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