Frederick Douglass: Freedom's Voice, 1818-1845

Overview

This work in the MSU Press Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series chronicles Frederick Douglass's preparation for a career in oratory, his emergence as an abolitionist lecturer in 1841, and his development and activities as a public speaker and reformer from 1841 to 1845. Lampe's meticulous scholarship overturns much of the conventional wisdom about this phase of Douglass's life and career uncovering new information about his experiences as a slave and as a fugitive; it provokes a deeper and richer understanding of ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$25.18
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$27.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $2.49   
  • New (5) from $16.76   
  • Used (5) from $2.49   
Sending request ...

Overview

This work in the MSU Press Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series chronicles Frederick Douglass's preparation for a career in oratory, his emergence as an abolitionist lecturer in 1841, and his development and activities as a public speaker and reformer from 1841 to 1845. Lampe's meticulous scholarship overturns much of the conventional wisdom about this phase of Douglass's life and career uncovering new information about his experiences as a slave and as a fugitive; it provokes a deeper and richer understanding of this renowned orator's emergence as an important voice in the crusade to end slavery. 
     Contrary to conventional wisdom, Douglass was well prepared to become a full-time lecturer for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in 1841. His emergence as an eloquent voice from slavery was not as miraculous as scholars have led us to believe. Lampe begins by tracing Douglass's life as slave in Maryland and as fugitive in New Bedford, showing that experiences gained at this time in his life contributed powerfully to his understanding of rhetoric and to his development as an orator. An examination of his daily oratorical activities from the time of his emergence in Nantucket in 1841 until his departure for England in 1845 dispels many conventional beliefs surrounding this period, especially the belief that Douglass was under the wing of William Lloyd Garrison. Lampe's research shows that Douglass was much more outspoken and independent than previously thought and that at times he was in conflict with white abolitionists. 
     Included in this work is a complete itinerary of Douglass's oratorical activities, correcting errors and omissions in previously published works, as well as two newly discovered complete speech texts, never before published.

 

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
At his death in 1895, Frederick Douglass had been widely considered for more than 50 years the outstanding African American orator of his time. Lampe (communication and theater arts, Univ. of Wisconsin) has studied his early years, 1841-45, when Douglass was polishing his oratorical style and sharpening his powers of persuasion in advancing the cause of abolishing slavery in the South and ending racial prejudice in the North. Lampe disputes the conventional view (not contradicted by Douglass himself) that he came to his calling without preparation, an ingenious accident. In fact, even as a very young man, Douglass was already steeped in the slave oral tradition and served as a lay preacher in a black church. The writing is straightforward but burdened by excessive detail. Suitable for academic libraries with collections in oratory and African American studies.--Harry Frumerman, formerly with Hunter Coll., New York
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780870134807
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/1998
  • Series: Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series
  • Pages: 350
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Gregory P.Lampe is provost and vice chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges. He taught in the Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Rock County.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Ch. 1 Frederick Douglass' Maryland Plantation Education: His Discovery of Oratory 1
Ch. 2 Frederick Douglass' New Bedford Experience: Oratory, Preaching, and Abolitionism, September 1838-July 1841 33
Ch. 3 The Emergence of an Orator from Slavery: Southern Slavery, Northern Prejudice, and the Church, August-December 1841 57
Ch. 4 Oratory of Power and Eloquence: From Local Notoriety to Regional Prominence, January-August 1842 97
Ch. 5 Tumultuous Times: Douglass as Abolitionist Orator, Agitator, Reformer, and Optimist, August 1842-June 1843 135
Ch. 6 The Hundred Conventions Tour of the West: Independence and Restlessness, June-December 1843 171
Ch. 7 The Hundred Conventions Tour of Massachusetts: Torrents of Eloquence, January-May 1844 207
Ch. 8 No Union With Slaveholders: The Proslavery Character of the United States Constitution, May-August 1844 227
Ch. 9 Douglass the Imposter: I Am a Slave, September 1844-August 1845 255
Epilogue 287
App. A Douglass' Speaking Itinerary: 1839-1845 293
App. B Frederick Douglass in Behalf of George Latimer. Lynn, Massachusetts, 8 November 1842 309
App. C No Union With Slaveholders: An Address Delivered in Boston, Massachusetts, 28 May 1844 315
App. D The Progress of the Cause: An Address Delivered in Norristown, Pennsylvania, 12 August 1844 321
Bibliography 323
Index 341
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)