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Frederick & Nelson, Washington (Images of America Series)
     

Frederick & Nelson, Washington (Images of America Series)

5.0 2
by Ann Wendell
 

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In 1890, D. E. Frederick arrived in Seattle and, joined soon after by Nels Nelson, started what would become one of the Northwest’s best-loved and well-regarded stores. For more than 100 years, Frederick & Nelson was much more than just a department store to the people of Seattle—it was an icon. F&N, as locals referred to it, established the

Overview


In 1890, D. E. Frederick arrived in Seattle and, joined soon after by Nels Nelson, started what would become one of the Northwest’s best-loved and well-regarded stores. For more than 100 years, Frederick & Nelson was much more than just a department store to the people of Seattle—it was an icon. F&N, as locals referred to it, established the city’s retail core, led the war-bond drive, acted as a civic booster, and pioneered a high level of benefits for its workers. But it was the customer experience that made all the difference at F&N. Whether it was a fashion show in the Tea Room, a visit to Santa, or the taste of a Frango, the memories of Frederick & Nelson still resonate today throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Title: Northwest Bookshelf

Author: Staff Writer

Publication: Seattle PI News

Date: 12/4/2008

FREDERICK & NELSON: Ann Wendell, Arcadia Publishing, 127 pages, $21.99. A Seattle writer with long family ties to the subject of her book compiles a nostalgic look at the late great Seattle department store in historic photos (mostly) and admiring words.

THE 10 BIG LIES ABOUT AMERICA: Michael Medved, Crown Forum, 262 pages, $26.95. The popular nationally syndicated conservative radio commentator, who lives on Mercer Island, sets out to correct what he sees as mistaken notions about the United States, including that "America was founded on genocide against Native Americans."

A WALLFLOWER CHRISTMAS: Lisa Kleypas, St. Martin's Press, 213 pages, $16.95. A best-selling Bellingham romance writer continues her popular "Wallflower" series set in Regency England with a holiday tale that focuses on the efforts of four married women to set up a bridal match for a roguish new arrival from America.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738558653
Publisher:
Arcadia Publishing SC
Publication date:
12/03/2008
Series:
Images of America Series
Pages:
130
Sales rank:
1,291,963
Product dimensions:
9.24(w) x 6.44(h) x 0.43(d)

Meet the Author


Author Ann Wendell’s family has over 100 years of service to Frederick & Nelson and its parent store, Marshall Field & Company. Although the author only lasted two weeks as a sales clerk (she was put in the linen department during a white sale), F&N still holds a special place in her heart. The vintage images within were gathered from the Museum of History and Industry, Seattle Municipal Archives, the collection of the author’s family, and other private collections.

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Frederick & Nelson, Washington (Images of America Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Images of my childhood memories of being taken to the Santa breakfast where I had my first taste of cranberry juice, so exotic to a six year old. Photos of me on the laps of the Easter bunny and Santa in the store windows and later taking my own son to the same place. Introducing my future husband to the delicious pot pies in the Paul Bunyan room and shopping for my wedding gear with Mom. All these memories came flooding back while turning the pages of this marvelous remembrance of a grand shopping emporium. Thank you Ann Wendell.
hebe More than 1 year ago
To explain my phobia of small chocolate objects I have to back to the summer of 1966. Seventeen years old, I stepped off the elevator on the Tenth floor of Frederick and Nelson and into the candy kitchen -- the fragrant and chaotic home of the Frango Mint.

The next three months were a whirl of penuche half-dips, walnut topped butter creams and, of course, the ever present Frango. I will never forget the cooling belt, (my first assignment), where gleaming brown rectangles emerged from a stainless steel tunnel, like small chocolate bats from hell, flying towards me and the other white-hatted staff waiting to transfer them to the wrapping trays. Soon, not sugarplums, but visions of lemon, mocha, and dark chocolate Frangos began to dance in my head. After a week of Frango grappling I had a sort of a frantic Frango fit and was discreetly moved from the belt to assist the hand dippers -- lining up nougat centers and checking the chocolate temps. It was, however, too late. The damage had been done. Ever since that day, over 40 years ago, even a slightly salty-sweet mint smell would put my heart into an arrhythmic state. I told my husband that when I used to scream in the night, monsters were after me, but really it was the Frangos -- glossy -- malevolent -- swooping towards me in a never-ending flow.

You can imagine my delight when browsing through Ann Wendell's new Images of America, Frederick and Nelson Book, that I was finally able to view the picture of the frighting Frango belt on page ninety-three with equanimity. I believe this is because her well researched and entertaining introduction followed by the nostalgic photos and pithy captions in the preceding pages did such an excellent job of reminding me of all the reasons I have to love that old store. Ms. Wendell¿s smooth prose style and her selection of both amusing and poignant photographic memories will transport you back to an age of elegance that is sorely missed in todays, ¿wadda ya want¿, school of retailing. From the cool formality of the Tea Room to the hilarious Christmas reindeer debacle, you too can read and view your way very pleasantly through decades of F&N quality, integrity, and service. As a true child of the Frederick and Nelson tradition Ms. Wendell combines attention to detail with a discerning style to provide both a satisfying journey into the past and a good read.
This book will put a smile on the face anyone who finds magic in times gone by; anyone who can remember dropping off parcels with the doorman, leaving a note for their Aunt Millie in the message book at the top of the sixth street entrance staircase or the delicious, melting taste of their first Frango.

Even me -- smiling and a Frango-phobic no more, I am quite sure that through the clever use of literary therapy, I am now cured of the curse of the demon mint.