Free Book

( 22 )

Overview

"I am a fanatic about freedom. And I'm fanatical about coming at you hard in this book."

Maybe you're not as free as you think you are. Even worse, you may have been duped into believing that a "balanced" life is the key to happiness (it isn't) or that a relationship with God is about layering on rules and restrictions (nope).

Whether it’s media-fueled fear, something a parent or teacher said that you just can’t shake, or even the reality of ...

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Free Book: I am a fanatic about freedom. I'm tired of seeing people beaten down by the world's systems and by religion. God's offering real freedom. Get yours.

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Overview

"I am a fanatic about freedom. And I'm fanatical about coming at you hard in this book."

Maybe you're not as free as you think you are. Even worse, you may have been duped into believing that a "balanced" life is the key to happiness (it isn't) or that a relationship with God is about layering on rules and restrictions (nope).

Whether it’s media-fueled fear, something a parent or teacher said that you just can’t shake, or even the reality of dark spiritual forces bent on keeping you down, something is holding you back from the full-on freedom God intends for you.

The Bible says, "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom." Not fear. Not guilt. Not morality. Freedom. You can have the sort of joy you thought only kids could have. The day of freedom is here.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780849920066
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/2/2010
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,411,592
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian
Tome leads Crossroads church, a movement of over 12,000 people connecting their seeking friends to a community of growing Christ-followers who are changing the world through combating poverty in Cincinnati, building an HIV/AIDS clinic in
South Africa, and battling child sex slavery in India.
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Read an Excerpt

Free Book

I am a fanatic about freedom. And I'm fanatical about coming at you hard in this book. I'm tired of seeing people beaten down by the world's systems and by religion. I'm sick of seeing people live safe, predictable lives while their God-given passions die. God's offering real freedom. Get yours.
By Brian Tome

Thomas Nelson

Copyright © 2010 Brian Tome
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8499-2006-6


Chapter One

The End of Fear

I am a fanatic about freedom.

When actor Charlie Sheen was using drugs, his dad, Martin Sheen, says he became a fanatic: "When a life is at stake and it's your child's, you become fearless in a lot of ways. I mean, you just become a fanatic. Nothing ever gets done unless it's done by a fanatic."

I'm fanatical about coming at you hard in this book. I'm tired of seeing people beaten down by the world's systems and by religion. I'm sick of seeing people live safe, predictable lives while their God-given passions die. I hate the assumption that getting close to God means more rules and restrictions. I'm also pissed that I'll have to fight to keep the word pissed in this book because the publisher will want to cave to more conservative types who want to keep everyone boxed into a specific type of language.

Let's get over ourselves. Let's get over such fearful living.

Right now, I'm living in freedom and loving it. It's the most helpful grid through which I makedecisions, and it's my biggest joy. Nothing else works for me-no set of rules, no self-improvement plan, no religion. My life isn't perfect, and I've had to work through some hard spots, but now I'm experiencing the kind of freedom God offers-and it's a blast. That's why I'm writing this: I want you to experience the same thing.

As I live out freedom, though, the things I say might cause objections. Bible thumpers could be concerned that I'm not honoring God. Psychologists could be concerned that I'm a narcissistic daredevil. Most Americans will be concerned that I'm being irresponsible. But like I said, I'm a fanatic about freedom, so I'm giving this all I've got.

Tackling freedom is like joining a revolution-and that revolution is happening in the communities I encounter. Jesus' message floored His culture, just like it floors ours. His main thing was teaching about the Kingdom of God, and the freedom that kingdom offers is a revolution that gets people fired up because they're experiencing God's love and giving it to others. This kingdom was and is completely unexpected. While people expected the Messiah to bring a huge street rebellion or a rigid institution of new religious laws, instead they got Jesus saying, "Love each other, love Me, and you will experience the best of this life."

We don't need another book about the cross. As offensive as that statement might sound, it's true. That important topic has been dissected every which way possible. But a book on freedom? Yes. We need it badly. Nearly all of the "Christian literature" you'll find about freedom is telling us to limit our freedom. Really?! What about "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom"? The Bible doesn't say, "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is restriction," or "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is morality." And the Bible definitely doesn't say, "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is fear."

We sing that America is "the land of the free and the home of the brave." It may be true that our Constitution protects our liberties like no other country, but if you look at the way we really function, it's according to fear. A better descriptor of us today is that we're the Land of the Fear and the Home of the Slave. Fear obstructs our understanding and route to freedom. In fact, it is the single biggest enemy of freedom, and it isn't until you get to the other side of fear that you experience the good stuff.

Have you noticed how nearly all lead news stories are based on fear? "Your microwave could kill you! Shocking details at eleven." Media is more enthusiastic about reporting on the economy's downturn than its upturn, reporting rape cases more often than rescues, and broadcasting people's mistakes rather than their successes. Even though we're watching and reading to be informed, in reality most media organizations exist only to hold our attention long enough for us to watch the advertising-where they make the big green. Unfortunately for us, we're drawn to things that strike fear and paranoia into us or things that make us believe that if we have this new "information," the things we fear won't happen.

We lead the world in popping pills to make us feel better, and we go through endless therapy for things we can't get freed from. We brace ourselves when something bad happens because "tragedy comes in threes." We can't fully enjoy a trip to the beach because we're afraid of getting skin cancer. We avoid the "bad" parts of the city and subconsciously teach our children to fear anyone who isn't from our own culture. We're so nervous about the reputation of Halloween and poisoned candy that we can't sit outside with our neighbors and eat KitKats together. We won't spend time with homosexuals because we're heterosexual and we fear that maybe we'll send them the wrong message, so we miss out on a person's individuality and on becoming engaged in his or her life.

American Christians, especially, live in this Land of Fear. That's ironic, because the core of the Christ-following life is about overcoming fear and bondage. The entire Kingdom of God is about freedom. "It is for freedom that Christ set us free." We've been freed from sin, and therefore we are free to have joy. Why is that so hard for us to accept? The Bible says God hasn't given us a spirit of fear, but a spirit of power, love, and self-discipline. This means that whenever we feel fearful, we are out of sync with the Spirit of God for that moment.

Here's something else to think about: fear is the starting point of purchasing insurance. There isn't another society in the world's history that has had as much insurance as modern-day Americans do. I'm calling myself out here, because I have every kind of insurance known to man: life, disability, medical, auto, home, canine. (Okay, I don't have canine insurance, but I'm sure I have some type of coverage to protect me in the event of Stanley's untimely demise.) Now, given my stage in life and my financial standing and obligations, I think it's responsible for me to have this coverage, but I can't help wondering if an unrealistic fear of the unknown causes me to pass this off as "responsible" when it might just be really neurotic. Is insurance bad? No. But what's bad is that some of us are trying to purchase security. Insurance can't give us security or power; only God can.

When I was a kid, I broke bones three times when riding my bike. Yet I kept riding. Without a helmet too-as God intended. How many of us had helmets when we were growing up? If you are over forty years old, you know where I'm going with this. No one wore a helmet while riding a bicycle. If my friends had caught me wearing a helmet, they would have beaten me about the head with blunt objects. We didn't go river rafting with helmets. We didn't do ropes courses with helmets. Yet, if I'd invested in helmet stock when I was eighteen, I'd be a millionaire right now.

I'm not really against helmets. What I'm against is their representation of our fear. (I don't mean to offend you, but if you put a helmet on your three-year-old when he's in the basement riding his tricycle, you are overly fearful, and you're probably conditioning your child to be fearful.)

Remember the controversy around the Beijing Olympics when China's female gymnasts were called out for being too young to compete? The MSNBC article "Why Restrict Ages Anyway?" said this: "The reason the Chinese might have to tell a fib? Simple, young girls make perfect gymnasts, with their bodies and minds uncluttered with the fear of falling and failure."

I don't want to live a life cluttered with the fear of falling and failure. One statement I make to myself-and this represents my opposition to fear-is that when riding my motorcycle in states that don't require helmets, I don't wear one. I hesitate to write this because I anticipate that many of you will immediately lose respect for me and give me guilt. You'll think I'm reckless, selfish, or stupid. Okay, maybe I am stupid. No doubt that if I wreck and suffer brain damage that a helmet would have saved me from, I'll regret riding with only my bandanna. But on all those days that I don't wreck, I win. I don't have wind fighting my helmet, and I don't get those endless vibrations that slightly blur my vision. My head is cooler, and, of course, I look cooler.

There's a tension, of course, between acting responsibly and acting out of fear. I recognize that. But God regularly embraces people who do dangerous things. A guy named David kills a lion. Samson takes a donkey's jawbone and uses it as a hatchet to kill his enemies. Esther risks death and confronts a king. Paul continually gets in situations where he's shipwrecked, beaten, and abused. If we think something isn't "safe," we think God's not into it. It's time to change that mentality, because God was in all of the above and in much of what we may be denying ourselves or running away from. Fear might keep you from going places you could enjoy, talking with people who could expand your thinking, and trying things that will grow you.

I also believe that fear is not just a negative emotion-it's a cancer. It's a full-on assault from an evil force who wants you belittled and your life (your living-life-for-all-it's-worth-and-going -for-the-gusto life) destroyed. If we saw someone in a casket at the end of his life, surrounded by people saying, "He was responsible, rational, and upstanding," then we should conclude, No, fear sapped the vigor out of who this guy really could have been. I don't want that for you. I want you to experience what Jesus meant when He said, "I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full."

God's primary mission is liberation. He not only wants to liberate us from our fears, grievances, addictions, petty preoccupations, and dozens of other distractions-but He's also about freeing the very planet we live on: "That the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the freedom and glory of the children of God."

By the way, I'm going to use a lot of Scripture in this book. I'm not assuming you believe everything in the Bible, but you'll see that these freedom thoughts aren't mine but ancient, deep-stream wisdom. If you do believe the Bible, you'll see that you can't get away from the freedom message.

This book is about you having a life void of fear and rife with freedom. It's about casting off whatever hinders you and going after the grand adventure of experiencing God while you experience all of life. You can have peace-living free from the burdens of your past mistakes and others' expectations. You can wake up excited and full of hope. You can have the sort of joy you thought only kids could have. And best I can, I want to help you get there.

If you are up for this message, strap on your helmet and let's get started. Or better yet, take it off.

Chapter Two

The Death of Religion

A guy was drinking a Bloody Mary in our church parking lot the other morning. We were tailgating-it was Super Bowl weekend-and the day was close to perfect. Football, trucks, fire pits, hot dogs, and beer? Perfect.

But not everyone thought it was perfect. If you haven't heard, church parking lots aren't supposed to host tailgates, and Bloody Marys are off-limits when you're fifty yards from a church door. So, apparently, we needed some reprimanding. It came in an e-mail:

>> I'm deeply offended and greatly disappointed by Crossroads' involvement with alcohol during the Super Bowl event. Such a move can be personally and spiritually devastating for people like myself [with an alcoholic past]. Will your next event involve weed or porn?!

Now honestly, I thought about calling this guy and saying, "Great idea! We love weed around here!" until I realized he probably wasn't in the mood for my sarcasm. Instead, I e-mailed back:

>> No, we won't be having weed or porn. We believe those things are wrong under every circumstance. But we don't believe alcohol is wrong under every circumstance. And I could quote you many scriptures about this, but then you'd probably have some to quote as well. Then I added: >> We don't want to cause anyone to stumble, and I don't think we caused you to stumble, either. Unless we consider giving you an opportunity to judge us as "stumbling." [That wasn't sarcasm, I promise.]

Here's the thing: thousands upon thousands of people have come to Crossroads, found Jesus, found forgiveness, found purpose, been baptized, and received grace. These are people with different beliefs, different cultures, and different piercings. And thousands of those people have gone back to their friends and shared what they found inside: authentic freedom. It's that simple.

Now, alcohol isn't an agent of freedom. In fact, it isn't even right for everyone to drink. (Some need to avoid it entirely because of how it makes them actor what's in their past.) What I'm saying is that it seems as though many of us are so fearful of only doing what's "right" that we've lost sight of the life Jesus came to give us. He came not to give us a life of abstinence but of abundance. Abundant alcohol? No. Abundant freedom.

How would you naturally complete the following sentence: "God's main thing is that He wants me to be __________"? What goes in your blank?

For most of my life I would have said something like, "God wants me to be moral." Or "God wants me to be spiritual." Or "God wants me to be good." Or "God wants me to sort my recyclables." But according to the Bible, the answer is "free." This is a pretty big shift from what most religions tell you, and it's the shift I had to make to understand freedom.

Somewhere along the way, the message and reputation of the Bible (and therefore man's idea of God) got reversed. Instead of people recognizing it was a message about total freedom and perfect love, the Bible unjustly earned a reputation for being a book of restrictions. But that's because of who has been representing it.

I don't think this is big news: many Christians are oppressive. When they're paraded on TV, all you see are the bad haircuts, and all you hear are the "should nots"-and the entire portrayal is guilt-ridden and sensationalized. And when it's not about the "should nots," it's about the "shoulds": "you should tithe; you should read the Bible; you should serve the poor"-and that message can be just as filled with guilt and misconceptions. There's no grace in that, and there's only a portion of the truth. No wonder people run from the guy wearing a gold cross lapel pin. Whatever happened to "You should enjoy your life"? How about some religious jewelry with that one?

I think a lot of Christ-followers are afraid of this freedom and grace idea. They think, What will people do if they believe they have complete freedom as a Christ-follower? Maybe they assume lives will get chaotic and out of control. They think people will become "of the world" instead of "of God." They worry that Christians will get a bad reputation. Guess what? For the most part, Christians already do have a bad reputation.

I've been around the religious scene for a long time. When you're the son of a church organist and have been a Christian for twenty-seven years-and a professional paid Christian for twenty years and the lead pastor of a church for twelve of those twenty-you inevitably go through "Christianity movements." There's no shortage: personal salvation (being "saved" is the most important moment of one's life), second touch of the Holy Spirit (you get a turbo-charged empowerment from God), social action (it's all about what work you do), moralism (laws and obedience make us holy), total grace (Jesus came solely to give grace and offer a burden-free life), and on and on. While all these movements are important in part and have scriptures to back them up, the overall theme of the Bible and Christ-following life is freedom. In fact, it's where the Bible begins. God creates a man and woman and gives them the autonomy to make a home, name the animals, create a business plan for their agriculture, and have sex-all at their own discretion.

God blessed them [Adam and Eve] and said to them: "Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air and over every living creature that moves on the ground." Then God said, "I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food. And to all the beasts of the earth and all the birds of the air and all the creatures that move on the ground-everything that has the breath of life in it-I give every green plant for food." And it was so.

God saw all that he had made, and it was very good.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Free Book by Brian Tome Copyright © 2010 by Brian Tome. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

1 The End of Fear 1

2 The Death of Religion 11

3 The Freedom Giver 21

4 New Identity 33

5 Forgiveness Freeway 43

6 Strongholds 65

7 The Spirit World 77

8 Evicting the Squatters 93

9 Experience the Ghost 105

10 Blahs, Break, Blues, and Blessings 125

11 The Unbalanced Life 143

12 Live It Out 159

13 Experience Community 181

14 When Grace Meets Truth 201

15 The Crash 219

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 19 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 1, 2010

    Free Book by Brian Tome

    The title of the book Free Book by Brian Tome has a very accurate title -- It is all about how to gain spiritual freedom in a world full of stronghold and bondage. Tome is very straight-forward throughout the whole book, not sugar-coating anything about it. He uses many scriptural references, which enhance the overall message of the book. He is also very tasteful in the presentation of his own opinions, making known that it is in fact just his opinion. Brian took a sometimes difficult to understand message about spiritual freedom, and broke it down into sections that were understandable for anyone to read, Christian or not.

    While the straight-to-the-point, cold-hard-truth style of the book caught me off guard at first, I started to enjoy it the more I read. The book was challenged my way of thought, the actions I take, and the way I want to live my life. It was comforting to know that while I was reading the painful truth, the author could relate with the pain by sharing a personal story about the subject, and how he made it through. This is definitely a book that I would recommend, especially if you feel that you are in bondage and want to know the steps to freedom that God has waiting for you.

    I am giving this book five out of five stars. As I thought about what to rate the book, I simply couldn't think of a reason NOT to give it five stars. Hope you enjoy it as well!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2014

    It means freeDOM book

    Silly:)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    It says free book y is it not free?

    Y?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 31, 2010

    You Too Can Be Free...

    In the book Free Book by Brian Tome, he discusses the principles of freedom which he has found in the Bible. He does not make an effort to stroke your ego, but plainly lays out some steps you need to take in order to experience freedom in Christ. One such process is confession. Honestly confessing to someone you have wronged, and somehow making restitution if necessary. Along with confession is asking for forgiveness. It is uncomfortable and, yes, embarrassing at times, but the reward is peace. Not peace as the world thinks of it, ie: absence of bad circumstances, but the peace that Christ affords. The peace of a clear conscience.
    Another topic that Brian focuses on as a reason for the lack of freedom in our lives, is the existence of strongholds in our lives, fear being a major one. Many people tend to mask their fear and give it a different label such as being practical. An example he shares is one where his mother-in -law went on a missions trip to Russia, and a 30 year old friend of Brian's had his ticket to go, but when he listened to his friends and family, about why he should not go, he ended up buying in and not going. When Brian's mother-in-law returned and shared her experiences and victories, the friend expressed his wish that he had gone.
    Strongholds keep us from being a blessing and receiving a blessing. There are six marks of strongholds he enumerates: 1) You have repeated, unwanted behavior. 2) You have memory gaps about childhood. 3) You have confusion about why you do something-like defend yourself in a certain way. 4) There is something about you nobody knows. 5) You have bitterness toward a person or type of person or 6) You blindly accept your limitations.
    Christ has said that He brings abundant life, but if there is something preventing you from living an abundant life, you owe it to yourself to buy this book and find out some steps you can take to get to the place where you can accept it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Free Book by Brian Tome

    I am completely in love with the premise of this book: our life in Christ is to be one of true freedom. I felt like Tome's attempts to deal with the issue of freedom from different angles simply resulted restating the same truth over and over again to the point of redundancy.

    I wonder if this book was originally a sermon series that was turned into a book because even though I didn't like the book as a whole, there were a few chapters that were personally engaging, helping, and interesting to me.

    I really related to the chapter on strongholds, how we build up barriers because we are fearful. The illustration in the chapter on 'evicting the squatters' was most illuminating. Spiritual abuse was touched upon, which I am sure many have experienced and then the chapter entitled 'Blahs, Break, Blues and Blessings' based on Moses leading the Israelites out of Egypt. Brilliant! We then have chapters on living out our freedom in God, in personal relationships, in community, in submission to authority (yes, there is freedom in this).

    Unfortunately, I struggled to connect with the author throughout the rest of the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 21, 2010

    Fanatacism Falls Short

    On the cover of Free Book, Brian Tome claims to be a fanatic about freedom. He promises to deliver a hard hit that will change the way you view the religious system and religion, itself. Wow! Sounds like a lot. It even sounds like something new and innovative. It's not.

    While he states the world does not need another book about the cross, rather, it needs a book about freedom (his philosphy is centered around 2 Corinthians 3:17), it really isn't THAT different from several other books on the market. Tome's book is about leading the life God intended you to lead without being fearful. It is about the importance of building community, charitable works, submitting to one another, and obeying God's laws.

    What is different is his offense over being judged by a congregant who was upset that a church social included alcohol. Tome wrote that alcohol was not bad for everyone and to say it was was to impose law. The church is responsible for instructing and guiding the flock. We are not to cause anyone to stumble [sin, lead astray]. His assertion that truth is needed to temper grace was not evident in the alcohol story. While it had good points, the book was not as hard hitting, fanatical or innovative as promised.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Drat it all. "Free Book" has got me bugged.

    In case you don't know, I review books for Thomas Nelson Publishers. No, I don't get paid - it's something I do because I love to read, love differing points of view, love to experience my precious Savior from a different point of view. I prayerfully select the books I'm going to read - not that I believe my reviews are that important, but because I want to know I'm reading the right book for me. Some selections have come easily and some have been a struggle. Some reads have been fast - leaving me wanting even more - and some have been slow yet satisfying. But so far, I've been able to find beauty in everything I've read.

    Until now.

    Drat it all. I was so looking forward to reading "Free Book" by Brian Tome. Being a renegade, the title intrigued me and the short description captured me. We all want to feel that amazing sense of liberty in Christ, and I've had it brush against my skin enough to know it's real. But something's wrong - and try as I might, I'm not sure what it is. The book is very methodical - one of the most "step-by-step" experiences in Christianity I've had in a long time. I could recommend the book based on that alone. And the book speaks of grace - not a grace to sin, but a rich and abiding grace in pressing in to God and His amazing liberty rather than strictly obeying rules and regulations.

    Brian talks about living an unbalanced life. It resonates with me, given my diverse palette of passions which are all summed up in Jesus. He even talks about tattoos. Having one (which I received to commemorate a milestone birthday), there should be a built-in kinship.

    So what is it about "Free Book" that's bugging me? As much as I hate to admit it, it's a style thing. A few weeks ago, I reviewed a book by an author named Chris Tomlinson. I likened him to a pesky little brother whose words pierce to the core. Brian Tome might be the one on the other end of that spectrum - the big brother who has the answer to everything. There is a "loudness" to his tone that goes beyond the 120-point type on the cover. The conversational style to his writing feels strongly one-way. Rather than inspired (as Craig Groeschel states in his recommendation of the book), I simply feel tired.

    Drat it all.

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  • Posted March 9, 2010

    Book Review: Free Book

    I just recently had the opportunity to read the Free Book by Brian Tome. This book is all about your freedom and the fact that you might not be as free as you think you are. A portion of the cover of the book states, "I'm sick of seeing people live safe, predictable lives while their God-given passions die." Is this you? Is this the way you see your life? Imagine living a life free from the troubles and burdens of this world.


    I would give this book a 6 out of 10. It was a very easy read, contains alot of scripture but somewhat failed to keep my attention. I felt that I connected with what he said through a few chapters, but was almost bored through alot of it. I had a hard time keeping attention as I read. As alot of the other reviews have said, this book is probably better for new, younger Christians. It is very simple and straightforward. Seems to be just a rambling of the authors view points on the Christians in this world today. He has a lot of good points and good scripture to back up his points, but it just really failed to keep my attention. It is a small book, only 230 pages, so it's definately a quick read.


    I think I would recommend this book to new Christians to just give them that extra boost of inspiration for following Christ, but other than that, it's just very average.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2010

    This book is about you having a life void of fear and rife with freedom. It's about casting off whatever hinders you and going after the grand adventure of experiencing God while you experience all of life

    I honestly loved this book. I can probably say that this book is the best I've read lately.
    It is challenging, I mean it was impossible for me to read it without wanting to change my life. I think that this book is written for everyone, everyone has some bondages that keeps them from experiencing the freedom that this books talks about, the freedom that Jesus strives to give us.

    I also loved the honest and straight approach that the author has here. He doesn't step aside from the truth, he doesn't care about criticism, he is transparent with his life and his mistakes, he really doesn't want to impress, he is just taking his calling seriously - he wants to give others freedom.

    This kind of freedom is only found in Christ because Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. (2 Corinthians 3.17)

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  • Posted February 26, 2010

    "There is no freedom this world can give like God gives to us his children this beautiful"

    Freedom!! Was the last word Mel Gibson shouted before he died in his movie "Braveheart" That was for that era, where freedom can only be afforded by blood. The sad thing is we are still in search of freedom or should we say we are self-proclaimed free. There is no freedom this world can give like God gives to us, his children, this beautiful. If there is fear, guilt or something that holds us from doing God's will, like bondages or strongholds this book pin-pointed, well, there is no Freedom.
    With a coffee-break conversational tone that complements the content or juice of this book. With a dash of healthy humor for the readers to enjoy this great read. One thing that this book puts the reader into is the challenge of breaking through the bondages and strongholds we have, for us to be free in tone to God's will. With all of the directions, enlightenments and the nuts-and-bolts about freedom, "it's up to you now whether you will grab the freedom God gave to us"

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted February 23, 2010

    Quick Paced "Free Book" by Brian Tome

    Honestly, this book grabbed my attention with the cover. And, admittedly, I am one who judges a book by its cover....every time. I am glad I chose this book, though, at times it seemed like it chose me.
    Tome speaks about how to live a more free and full life, in accordance to the scripture and in harmony with God. He gives a very simple, yet credible, manner in which any person can rid themselves of things in their lives that are holding them back, down, or away from the fullness of life that God wants for us.

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. While Tome's opinions (some more controversial than others) are interwoven throughout the book, I was still able to read and grasp the content that I wanted to retain and leave the rest. Tome does an excellent job of referencing the Bible and using biblical references throughout his text. I would recommend this to a friend, yet I would preface the recommendation with a note that his opinions can be a little abrasive at times.




    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted February 18, 2010

    Practical Freedom

    "How in the world can you say that?"

    Those were my first thoughts after reading the first two chapters of Free Book by Brian Tome.

    He begins our trek by expressing his passion for freedom with seemingly extreme examples. Situations that for many would even appear reckless. The reader will either keep reading because he is ticked off or because they are on board with whatever he has to say next.

    After creating an atmosphere of nervous curiosity, Brian lays out some very practical principles for understanding, gaining and continuing in freedom.

    To help us understand, he gives a brief explanation of how knowing who we are in Christ is essential to being free. With that established, we are led through not only some steps to move toward freedom but also why those steps are crucial although not always easy. The journey winds down as the process of continued liberation is brought to light. He discusses how necessary and beneficial submission, community, grace and truth really are.

    Brian's goal.that his readers close the book knowing that freedom is attainable and sustainable. Does he achieve that goal? I believe he does.

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  • Posted February 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Who Wants Spiritual Freedom? Review of Free Book by Brian Tome

    Free Book is about spiritual freedom. The author, Brian Tome, argues that the organized religion that most Christians follow has stolen that freedom and replaced it with a system of rules and guilt. I agree with him.

    It seems like Brian is a great guy; I would enjoy drinking beer or riding Harleys with him. The best part of the book was his discussion of "the blues," the time lag between when you start sowing seeds of success (what he calls the "break") and when you reap the blessing of the harvest (pp. 136-140).

    But nothing groundbreaking was added to the discussion of spiritual freedom. There was little detailed advice on how to break free. And the things that he mentions as examples of freedom - drinking beer, riding a Harley, getting a tattoo - are nothing new; they are just the "contemporary mega-church pastor" stereotype. The only thing he neglects to mention is how much he loves U2.

    And I vehemently disagree with Brian's lack-based view on money. His church board demanded that all the profits from all his books go directly to the church; he submitted to this theft instead of teaching them about financial freedom. Acts 5:3-4 makes clear that we have the freedom to give money to the church or not. The profits from his books are none of the church board's business, unless he neglects his church work. What makes it worse is that prosperity (financial freedom) is one of the main areas that organized religion gets wrong.

    Free Book was a disappointment.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their Booksneeze program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Read more reviews at http://sowingsuccess.com

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  • Posted February 5, 2010

    Free Book: Good News for a Beaten Down World

    Life at it's best is like a rollercoaster; full of ups and downs. Too often though, fear, legalism and the opinions of others makes life an uphill climb without the exhilaration of flying down the hill full-speed, defying the law of gravity. Pastor and author, Brian Tome, seeks to reintroduce those of us who have been beaten down by the world to the freedom available to us in Jesus Christ.

    In the subtitle of his book, Tome, lets his readers know that he is going to apply the maximum shock in order to revive the enslaved soul. He states:

    "I am a fanatic about freedom. And I am fanatical about coming at you in this book. I am tired of seeing people beaten down by the world's. system and by religion. I am tired of seeing people live safe predictable lives while their God-given passions die. I hate the assumption that getting close to God means more rules and more instructions. No more. God is offering real freedom. Get yours."

    Tome does not disappoint when you open the book. Chapters one and two set forth his manifesto of freedom. I will admit that the initial shock of this book nearly made me turn away from the rest of the book. I set the book aside for a time and sought out the website of his church. When I had listened to a couple sermons and realized that Tome did indeed live in the same world as I do, I was ready for the rest of the ride.

    What I discovered in chapters three through fourteen was a man of God who knows Jesus and lives in the fullness of the grace God has given him. In these chapters, he introduces the reader to a relationship with Jesus Christ, the believer's identity in Christ, the importance of walking in the Spirit and the spiritual warfare we all experience. He does this without putting the reader into bondage of living life by yet another program.

    Tome is both confessional and honest. He opens the reader to some of his struggles and the insights that he gained from them. In the final chapter he ties everything together with an account that shows that bad things do happen in this life, but so do miracles. And no matter what happens to us, it never diminishes the love that God has for us.

    I commend this book to anyone who is fed up with the rut in which they are living. Tome tackles an issue that few in the body of Christ ever touch.

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  • Posted February 2, 2010

    Review: Free Book

    I recently finished reading Free Book by Brian Tome. As I read the first page of the book, I thought I was going to be hooked. I mean, Tome used the word "pissed" in the second paragraph. He also said he was going to "[come] at you hard". (3). So I was expecting a lot from this book. That feeling quickly disappeared when I turned the page and saw: "We don't need another book about the cross. As offensive as that statement might sound, it's true." (4) It might be offensive.because it is! I paused for a moment after reading this quote. This statement is where I think Tome misses the point. Christian freedom is entirely about and dependent on the cross. It is the death and resurrection of Christ that sets us free from the power of sin, death, and the Devil. To discount the cross is to discount the freedom that we receive in Christ.

    In chapter two, Tome states, "Somewhere along the way, the message and reputation of the Bible (and therefore man's idea of God) got reversed. Instead of people recognizing it was a message about total freedom and perfect love, the Bible unjustly earned a reputation of being a book of restrictions." (15) He goes on to say, "[T]he overall theme of the Bible and Christ-following life is freedom." (16) Again, I disagree. The overall theme of the Bible is God. The Bible is about God's salvific acts that culminated in the death and resurrection of Christ for the forgiveness of sins. But this is not something we hear from Tome until chapter three!

    Another thing that kind of left me scratching my head was how does Tome define freedom. In talking about freedom, specifically Christian freedom, a definition would be helpful, although Tome does say it's not about a "life without boundaries" (24) and it does "require a decision to follow someone" (26) , we never actually get a definition of Christian freedom.

    There were times that I felt Tome was heavy on works. Tome writes, "Getting free relies on God's power." (127) No problem there. But then he continues, "[B]ut it also almost always requires some work or persistence on our part." (127) What happened to justification by grace through faith alone? Granted, faith without works is dead (James3:14-26) but those works stem from our faith. We do good works because we are justified. To think otherwise is, as Martin Luther put it, "the height of folly and the ignorance of Christian life and faith."

    I give this book 1 out of 5 stars.

    Disclaimer:
    I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. Providing me a free copy in no way guarantees a favorable review. The opinions expresses in this review are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 27, 2010

    Free Book Review

    I was given "Free Book" by Brian Tome to review through Thomas Nelson Publisher's BookSneeze. I had read about the book before hand and knew that the first few pages (think 20-25 pages) were a little hard to swallow and could be considered quite controversial so I was prepared to stick it out and read on past the beginning once I got the book. As I started the book, I have to admit I didn't agree with a lot of the stuff he tells about in the first pages of the book. The things he talks about in the beginning make me wonder if his view point couldn't allow a person to keep living a life of sin and not be fully committed to Christ IF they stopped reading after those first 20-25 pages. Now chapters 3-11 I am right on track with. I believe those chapters are extremely helpful and very insightful and can aid a Christian in their walk to experience freedom in Christ. I believe that Brian is pointing out the Biblical concepts that many Christians have failed to recognize....that Jesus alone truly is freedom! In chapters 12-15, there are some good things in these chapters. However, he talks about submitting completely to authority (even governments) but I believe that if that authority or government is pointing you away from God then I question being fully submitted to such authority. I believe that you have to take a stand for God always and he never mentions standing up for what you believe, for God/Bible at all while he is talking about submitting to authority in these chapters.

    Overall, Brian Tome's book "Free Book" is a book that would be good "meat" for a mature Christian who is firmly rooted in Jesus and has a good filter. It could easily sway or confuse a new Christian. However, a mature Christian could filter out the stuff they don't need and still glean from his insightfulness in areas of the book. I am glad I was able to read and review "Free Book".

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2010

    Free Boook by Brian Tome

    "Free Book" by Brian Tome is a book about the freedom that an individual can find through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Tome, in a very animated and excitable fashion, encourages his readers to live this free life to its fullest. I had an immediate interest in this book due to the subject. I wish I could say that I liked it, but I can't. "Free Book" did not deliver. Tome's book started slowly, and I was tempted to put it down. The book does get a little better as it goes along. Tome's style of writing is different. It is in-your-face and some may even find it offensive in parts. I had hoped this book would have been deeper. It just seemed "light" to me in the areas where depth was needed. If you have been a Christian for any period of time, there is not a whole here that you will find new. Freedom is about surrender and surrender is a life-long process. That process is discipleship. However, one part shone through. I found the chapter dealing with overcoming personal strongholds and evicting "squatters" from your life to be especially helpful. These chapters were well written and gave sound and practical principles that can help make a difference. I was challenged to evaluate my life and determine if anything negative had moved-in that did not belong that may prove harmful. Overall, I give this book two stars. I provide this review as a member of Thomas Nelson Book Review Blogger program http://brb.thomanelson.com

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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