Free Software, Free Society: Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman

Overview

This collection includes historical writings such as The GNU Manifesto, which defined and launched the activist Free Software Movement, along with new writings on hot topics in copyright, patent law, and the controversial issue of "trusted computing." Stallman takes a critical look at common abuses of copyright law and patents when applied to computer software programs, and how these abuses damage our entire society and remove our existing freedoms. He also discusses the social aspects of software and how free ...

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Free Software, Free Society: Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman

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Overview

This collection includes historical writings such as The GNU Manifesto, which defined and launched the activist Free Software Movement, along with new writings on hot topics in copyright, patent law, and the controversial issue of "trusted computing." Stallman takes a critical look at common abuses of copyright law and patents when applied to computer software programs, and how these abuses damage our entire society and remove our existing freedoms. He also discusses the social aspects of software and how free software can create community and social justice.


Given the current turmoil in copyright and patent laws, including the DMCA and proposed CBDTPA, these essays are more relevant than ever. Stallman tackles head-on the essential issues driving the current changes in copyright law. He argues that for creativity to flourish, software must be free of inappropriate and overly-broad legal constraints. Over the past twenty years his arguments and actions have changed the course of software history; this new book is sure to impact the future of software and legal policies in the years to come.


Lawrence Lessig, the author of two well-known books on similar topics, writes the introduction. He is a noted legal expert on copyright law and a Stanford Law School professor.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781882114986
  • Publisher: Free Software Foundation
  • Publication date: 6/1/2002
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 7.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Editor's Note
A Note on Software
Topic Guide
Introduction

Section One: The GNU Project and Free Software
The GNU Project
The GNU Manifesto
Free Software Definition
Why Software Should Not Have Owners
What's in a Name?
Why "Free Software" is Better Than "Open Source"
Releasing Free Software if You Work at a University
Selling Free Software
Free Software Needs Free Documentation
Free Software Song

Section Two: Copyright, Copyleft, and Patents
The Right to Read
Misinterpreting Copyright - A Series of Errors
Science Must 'Push' Copyright Aside
What is Copyleft?
Copyleft: Pragmatic Idealism
The Danger of Software Patents

Section Three: Freedom, Society and Software
Can You Trust Your Computer?
Why Software Should Be Free
Copyright and Globalization in the Age of Computer Networks
Free Software: Freedom and Cooperation
Words to Avoid

Section Four: The Licenses
GNU General Public License (GPL)
GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)
GNU Free Documentation License (FDL)
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