Freedom Ain't Free

Freedom Ain't Free

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by Jay Mcfarland
     
 

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Freedom Ain’t Free goes beyond the partisan rhetoric of the day to explain how our current government is removing rights in the name of protecting them. Jay Mcfarland cuts through today's emotional arguments and clearly defines how a free society is supposed to function, and what price we each must pay in order to maintain our freedoms.

Overview

Freedom Ain’t Free goes beyond the partisan rhetoric of the day to explain how our current government is removing rights in the name of protecting them. Jay Mcfarland cuts through today's emotional arguments and clearly defines how a free society is supposed to function, and what price we each must pay in order to maintain our freedoms.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011059193
Publisher:
Jay Mcfarland
Publication date:
05/31/2010
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
196 KB

Meet the Author

Jay Mcfarland did not have a typical American upbringing. At the age of nine his parents were divorced leaving him in a single parent home in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Northern California. Without the necessary parental involvement, and due to many poor choices, Jay dropped out of high school and eventually found himself homeless and on the road to drug and alcohol abuse. Thanks to some family intervention, especially on the part of his older brother, Jay began to pull his life together, and after some years at the age of 20, he left to serve a full time mission for the LDS Church in Miami Florida, where he became fluent in the Spanish language. Shortly after his return from this two year mission he married and began to consider what he should be when he "grows up." Unfortunately, without an education, his options seemed limited, but undaunted by this obstacle he powered forward. Jay soon found that he had a natural ability towards leadership and management, and as such he quickly worked his way up the corporate ladder. By the age of 31 he had achieved the position of Regional Manager with the Little Caesars Corporation, where he directly supervised the daily operations of 42 of the most profitable pizza restaurants within the company. After working most of his life in the restaurant business, Jay sought a career change that would allow him to effect a change within his community. With this in mind, he financed a small radio show in the Las Vegas Nevada market. Within a matter of months Jay was hired by Gavin Spittle, the program director of KXNT, a CBS Affiliate, to host a weekend talk radio show by the Program Director Gavin Spittle. Approximately, 3 years later Jay was invited to bring his show to the Dallas market on AM 1080 KRLD where he thrived ever since. Jay is the proud father of four beautiful children and has been married for 18 years as of 2009.

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Freedom Ain't Free 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
donnie98125 More than 1 year ago
Early on, Jay claims that (to paraphrase) because we enjoy freedoms in our country, the price we pay for our freedoms is the occasional trouble maker who will use the freedoms for bad. In other words, curtailing our freedoms in order to be 'safer' is about the worst thing we should do. Putting God Bless Our Troops stickers on our cars means not a whit, if we civilians can't live with a little trouble in our own lives ourselves. That's the price for freedom, a little messiness now and again. We don't take freedoms away because a few bad apples make a mess. We just move on. I wasn't sure what to make of this book, but with such an intelligent beginning, I'll be sure to read the rest.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Freedom!!!!!!! I have the nook simple read and i cant buy any games because my nook doesnt have color help please call me @ 7184652434 help me!!!!!!!
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