Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Overview

Sixty years ago, the United Nations took a moral stand against human rights crimes and adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a proclamation of thirty rights that belong to us all, starting memorably with Article 1: “All human beings are born free and equal.”

Now, an array of internationally acclaimed writers have chosen one of the thirty rights as the inspiration for a short story. Published in association with Amnesty International, the result is a mix of ...

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Freedom: Stories Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Overview

Sixty years ago, the United Nations took a moral stand against human rights crimes and adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a proclamation of thirty rights that belong to us all, starting memorably with Article 1: “All human beings are born free and equal.”

Now, an array of internationally acclaimed writers have chosen one of the thirty rights as the inspiration for a short story. Published in association with Amnesty International, the result is a mix of thoughtful, serious, funny, and thrilling stories that harness the power of literature to celebrate—and affirm—our shared humanity.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ranging from the surreal to the subtle, this sweeping anthology illustrates the tenets of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and features a contributor list that reads like a who's who of leading writers from across the globe, including David Mitchell, Joyce Carol Oates, Paulo Coelho, Mahmoud Saeed, Yann Martel, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. In Kate Atkinson's "The War on Women," Britain passes a law requiring women to stay home and wear the burqa. A group of neighbors in a housing project takes justice into their own hands in Walter Mosley's "The Trial." The protagonist of James Meek's "The Kind of Neighbor You Used to Have" discovers how little risk his neighbors are willing to take to avert injustice. Banana Yoshimoto's "A Special Boy" delves into the effects of a mother's abandonment of her son. The narrator of Ali Smith's "The Go-Between" occupies the space between oppression and freedom--literally--as he attempts to move from Morocco into Spain. Vibrant and often chilling, these stories paint a rousing picture of the continuing battle to ensure basic human dignity. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
“The stories here are impressive in scope and show that The Universal Declaration of Human Rights can apply to many aspects of the human experience. Valuable reading.”—Library Journal

"Vibrant and often chilling, these stories paint a rousing picture of the continuing battle to ensure basic human dignity."—Publishers Weekly

“A timely reminder of the need for basic human dignity, freedom, rights, and respect. Inspirational and a very good read.” —Big Issue
 
“Angry, moving, upsetting, inspiring . . . It’s not always subtle. But it’s very effective.” —Daily Mail
 
“Freedom is illuminating and impressive.” —Guardian
 
“This is an inspirational collection of stories. Each tale . . . uses the power of literature to outstanding effect.” —Good Book Guide

Library Journal
Thirty-six authors ranging widely in nationality have contributed to this tribute to The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. With an introduction by Archbishop Desmond Tutu discussing literature as an expression of humanity and a moving epilog by Henning Mankell, this compilation includes stories inspired by each of the declaration's 30 articles. The writers, who include Joyce Carol Oates, Walter Mosley, David Mitchell, Ariel Dorfman, Banana Yoshimoto, Yann Martel, Paulo Coehlo, Nadine Gordimer, and Rohinton Mistry, among many others, interpret the articles as they consider culture, government, religion, law, gender, race, and media in relation to human rights. For instance, in "The Kind of Neighbor You Used To Have," James Meek writes effectively of a man detained without habeas corpus and confronted by a neighbor who himself has been taken in to custody to persuade the detainee to confess to his crime. Kate Atkinson's satirical and frightening "The War on Woman" focuses on an apolitical woman whose mundane existence is altered by an increasingly aggressive enforcement of a law against women. VERDICT The stories here are impressive in scope and show that The Universal Declaration of Human Rights can apply to many aspects of the human experience. Valuable reading.—Cristella Bond, Anderson P.L., IN
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307588838
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/4/2011
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 718,769
  • Product dimensions: 5.16 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Contributors:
 
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie • Mohammed Naseehu Ali • Kate Allen • Gabriella Ambrosio • Kate Atkinson • Liana Badr • Ishmael Beah • Héctor Aguilar Camín • Amit Chaudhuri • Paulo Coelho • Vered Cohen-Barzilay • David Constantine • Ariel Dorfman • Helen Dunmore • Jon Fosse • Petina Gappah • Alan Garner • Nadine Gordimer • Juan Goytisolo • Patricia Grace • Richard Griffiths • Xiaolu Guo • Milton Hatoum • A. L. Kennedy • Olja Knezevic • Marina Lewycka • Henning Mankell • Yann Martel • James Meek • Rohinton Mistry • David Mitchell • Walter Mosley • Joyce Carol Oates • Alice Pung • Mahmoud Saeed • Ali Smith • Archbishop Desmond Tutu • Alexis Wright • Banana Yoshimoto
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Table of Contents

Foreword Archbishop Desmond Tutu Vii
Foreword
Vered Cohen-Barzilay X
Introduction Larry Cox Xiii
Patricia Grace Busy Lines
1
A. L. Kennedy The Effects of Good Government on the City 7
James Meek The Kind of Neighbor You Used To Have
18
Marina Lewycka Business Philosophy 37
Mohammed Naseehu Ali The Long Ride Back Home
42
Gabriella Ambrosio Sticko 55
Joyce Carol Oates Tetanus
63
Walter Mosley The Trial 81
David Mitchell Character Development
107
Ariel Dorfman Innocent Passage 117
Amit Chaudhuri Aniruddha: The Latest Installment
146
Petina Gappah An Incident At Lunchtime 153
Milton Hatoum Torn
165
Ali Smith The Go-Between 172
David Constantine Asylum
178
Jon Fosse Homecoming 190
Kate Atkinson The War On Women
195
Banana Yoshimoto A Special Boy 212
Alexis Wright Be Careful About Playing With the Path of Least Resistance
217
Helen Dunmore Where I Keep My Faith 229
Héctor Aguilar Camín Comrade Vadillo
235
Paulo Coelho In The Prison of Repose 261
Mahmoud Saeed Warriors of the Sky
274
Richard Griffiths The Obvious Candidate 289
Juan Goytisolo Mr. President . . .
299
Yann Martel The Moon Above His Head 303
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Sola
310
Nadine Gordimer Amnesty 315
Xiaolu Guo An Internet Baby
324
Alice Pung The Shed 330
Ishmael Beah ABC Antidote
340
Alan Garner Gray Wolf, Prince Jack, and The Firebird 351
Liana Badr March of the Dinosaurs
362
Rohinton Mistry The Scream 371
Olja Knezevic The Classroom
383
Epilogue: Henning Mankell Sofia 396
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights 399
Contributors
405
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Customer Reviews

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