Freedom in This Village: Twenty-Five Years of Black Gay Men's Writing, 1979 to the Present

Overview

Freedom in This Village charts for the first time ever the innovative course of black gay male literature of the past 25 years. Starting in 1979 with the publication of James Baldwin's final novel, Just Above My Head, then on to the radical writings of the 1980s, the breakthrough successes of the 1990s, and up to today's new works, editor E. Lynn Harris collects 47 sensational stories, poems, novel excerpts, and essays. Authors featured include Samuel R. Delany, Essex Hemphill, Melvin Dixon, Marlon Riggs, Assotto...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.39
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$15.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (37) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $5.97   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Freedom in This Village charts for the first time ever the innovative course of black gay male literature of the past 25 years. Starting in 1979 with the publication of James Baldwin's final novel, Just Above My Head, then on to the radical writings of the 1980s, the breakthrough successes of the 1990s, and up to today's new works, editor E. Lynn Harris collects 47 sensational stories, poems, novel excerpts, and essays. Authors featured include Samuel R. Delany, Essex Hemphill, Melvin Dixon, Marlon Riggs, Assotto Saint, Larry Duplechan, Reginald Shepherd, Carl Phillips, Keith Boykin, Randall Kenan, Thomas Glave, James Earl Hardy, Darieck Scott, Gary Fisher, Bruce Morrow, John Keene, G. Winston James, Bil Wright, Robert Reid Pharr, Brian Keith Jackson, as well as an array of exciting new and established writers.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786713875
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 9/9/2004
  • Pages: 459
  • Sales rank: 1,013,222
  • Product dimensions: 5.42 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

E. Lynn Harris
E. Lynn Harris
How to categorize E. Lynn Harris? An African-American novelist? A gay novelist? A literary romance writer? Nothing quite fits, but to Harris’s fans, his bestselling novels belong in a genre of their own: one in which the characters are as difficult and complex as their problems, and the solutions as bittersweet and resonant as they often are in life.

Biography

Jackie Collins has kept the literary romance world well stocked with claws-out, upper-crust melodramas. But until E. Lynn Harris came along, the genre lacked a little ... diversity. Harris brought diversity and then some, with his now-trademark "buppie" characters, questions about sexuality, and hopelessly (but deliciously) complicated relationships.

Written from both male and female points of view and featuring recurring characters, Harris's books can be read as a veritable soap opera. The cycle begins with Invisible Life, the story of Raymond Winston Tyler Jr. -- a character Harris has acknowledged bears many similarities to himself. Raymond grapples with his sexuality, developing a relationship with a man he meets in law school and jeopardizing one with his girlfriend. His coming-of-age continues over the next two novels in the trilogy, Just As I Am and Abide with Me, as he struggles with losses of friends to AIDS, the ending of a relationship with an actress, and the beginning of a new one with a man.

Another recurring Harris character, Basil Henderson, is the man readers love to hate. An arrogant, badass football player-turned-sports agent, Basil beds both women and men until he meets up with his female (and later, male) counterparts. His story is mainly told in Not a Day Goes By and Any Way the Wind Blows.

It's true that in the Basil Henderson books, Harris is taking a saucy cue or two from his female romance novel predecessors; but the author claims to be more heavily influenced by writers such as Maya Angelou and Terry McMillan, and it would be misleading to pigeonhole his books as purely guilty pleasures. Particularly in his earlier books, Harris brought to a mainstream readership the issues that many gay and bisexual men face, and added a new voice to the portrayal of black, upwardly mobile characters. And in books such as If This World Were Mine and the young adult novel Diaries of a Light-Skinned Colored Boy, he has addressed issues of race and self-realization.

Given his themes, it may seem surprising that the majority of Harris's readers are straight women; but it's also a testament to his ability to write about love and self-discovery with humor, not to mention a little steaminess.

Good To Know

Harris worked as a salesman for IBM, and earned a following by self-publishing Invisible Life before getting a book deal.

He was tapped to write the screenplay for an update of the 1976 movie Sparkle, to be produced by Whitney Houston's production company. But with the death of Aaliyah, who was attached to star, the project's future is uncertain.

He lived most of his adult life in Chicago, Illinois.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 20, 1955
    2. Place of Birth:
      Flint, Michigan
    1. Date of Death:
      July 23, 2009
    2. Place of Death:
      Los Angeles, California

Table of Contents

From Just above my head 1
Passion 13
Assumption about the Harlem brown baby 17
Brother to brother : words from the heart 21
From Flight from Neveryon 35
Michael Stewart is dead 45
On not being white 47
19 a poem about Kenny/portrait of a hard rock 65
The trouble I've seen 67
Other countries : the importance of difference 83
Couch poem 101
Brothers loving brothers 107
"Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien" 109
The tomb of sorrow 113
Aunt Ada pieces a quilt 127
For colored boys who have considered s-curls when the hot comb was enuf 131
I'm going out lke a fucking meteor 137
Black macho revisited : reflections of a SNAP! queen 151
Uprising 259
From 2nd time around 263
Fantasy 277
Arabesque 279
Your mother from Cleveland 285
The letter 295
Living as a lesbian 301
How to handle a boy in women's shoes 313
Minotaur 319
From A long and liberating moan 323
Magnetix 327
From Beyond the down low : sex and denial in black America 331
The death and light of Brian Williamson 347
Palimpsest 353
Game 369
From Walt loves the bearcat 383
Infidelity 401
What I did for love 421
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2005

    Our Time Has Come

    Just started reading it (smile) but felt compelled to write the following...If you are a lover of Black Gay Male Literature then this is the book to purchase. Freedom In This Village: Twenty-Five Years of Black Gay Men's Writing edited and and with an introudction by E. Lynn Harris. I happened (smile) to be coming from The Abbey during my time home in Los Angeles last week when I passed A Different Light Bookstore. I went in and displayed prominently was this book and of course, I had to have it, and so I bought it, and anticipated reading it once I completed 'The Last Dream Before Dawn.' I started reading this book last night on the 2 train (New York City) and while I was reading 'About The Contributors' a combination of anger and sadness came over me and one that at this time I cannot capture but it was more to the fact that we need books that celebrate us...Black Gay Men I was saddened by the number of men who died of AIDS related illnesses and was like what are we doing, what am I doing, to honor these men who made it possible for me to be one that to some degree has a bit more 'freedom in the village' than they did. As I was looking through the 'Table of Contents' I saw some familiar names and new names that I look forward to reading. We need or rather I feel we need books like this on the regular as there are so many voices as one is not merely enough and also cannot tell all our stories. I implore you, each of you, to rise and have your voices heard and if you are a lover of Black Gay Male Literature then by all means purchase this book if not for you then for someone else. With that said, I have some reading to do (smile)...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2005

    Finally!

    What many folks fail to recognize is the lack of 'African-American' men and women in the GLBT community. Well, that has finally been done with now that this fine compilation has been released. Composed of the finest black gay mens writing from the past 25 years, 'Freedom in This Village' includes some of the best short stories, essays and poems ranging from the sinewy sweet to the angry to the uplifting and the downtrodden. A wonderful collection of writing and a wonderful monument to gay black men everywhere who are marginalized and pushed aside.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)