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Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court: The Defining Cases
     

Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court: The Defining Cases

by Terry Eastland (Editor)
 
In "Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court", Terry Eastland brings together the Court's leading First Amendment cases, some 60 in all, starting with Schenck v. United States (1919) and ending with Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1998). Complete with a comprehensive introduction, pertinent indices and a useful bibliography, "Freedom of Expression in the

Overview

In "Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court", Terry Eastland brings together the Court's leading First Amendment cases, some 60 in all, starting with Schenck v. United States (1919) and ending with Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union (1998). Complete with a comprehensive introduction, pertinent indices and a useful bibliography, "Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court" offers the general and specialized reader alike a thorough treatment of the Court's understanding on the First Amendment's speech, press, assembly, and petition clauses.

Author Biography: Terry Eastland has written for numerous publications on a wide variety of political and legal issues. His books include "Energy in the Executive: The Case for the Strong Presidency"; "Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice"; and "Religious Liberty in the Supreme Court: The Cases That Define the Debate Over Church and State".

Editorial Reviews

USA Today
This book should be in the classrooms—not just the libraries—of our school.
— Nat Hentoff
Choice
Eastland has assembled an excellent collection of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases and provides commentary dealing with free expression in a masterly introductory essay. Each of the 60 cases covered includes an informative statement of the facts, an explanation of the doctrine or test used in reaching the decision, and an account of how the Court later treated the precedent set by the case. Excerpts from Court opinions and major concurrences and dissents are carefully selected. 'Responses,' editorial comments from national newspapers and magazines, or statements from organizations affected by the rulings follow most cases. This unique feature provides thoughtful material for evaluating the cases. This book would be a splendid text for courses in constitutional law, political science, or journalism. Recommended for undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections.
Herman Belz
Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court is a valuable contribution to the literature on modern constitutional law. While fully attentive to legal doctrines and styles of judicial decision making, Eastland provides a clear, critical, and refreshingly nontechnical documentary account of succeeding waves of civil libertarianism that have redefined the relationship between American citizens and the federal government in the twentieth century. Substantial selections from leading judicial opinions, combined with contemporary journalistic commentary, give this sourcebook a richly contextualized historical character.
Henry J. Abraham
Freedom of Expression in the Supreme Court renders a significant contribution to our First Amendment literature. The 60 defining 20th century freedom of speech, press, and assembly cases, from Schenck (1919) through Finley (1998), represent a splendid compendium of the subject, both for the public at large and as a teaching tool. The author deserves warm plaudits for a handsomely produced and expertly edited work.
USA Today - Nat Hentoff
This book should be in the classrooms—not just the libraries—of our school.
CHOICE
Eastland has assembled an excellent collection of landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases and provides commentary dealing with free expression in a masterly introductory essay. Each of the 60 cases covered includes an informative statement of the facts, an explanation of the doctrine or test used in reaching the decision, and an account of how the Court later treated the precedent set by the case. Excerpts from Court opinions and major concurrences and dissents are carefully selected. 'Responses,' editorial comments from national newspapers and magazines, or statements from organizations affected by the rulings follow most cases. This unique feature provides thoughtful material for evaluating the cases. This book would be a splendid text for courses in constitutional law, political science, or journalism. Recommended for undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections.
Eugene Volokh
A splendid textbook for any free speech class, or for that matter for any reader interested in free speech. The contemporaneous reactions from leading newspapers are an especially valuable and unusual feature.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780847697106
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2002
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
7.36(w) x 10.34(h) x 1.52(d)

Meet the Author

Terry Eastland has written for numerous publications on a wide variety of political and legal issues. His books include Energy in the Executive: The Case for the Strong Presidency; Ending Affirmative Action: The Case for Colorblind Justice; and Religious Liberty in the Supreme Court: The Cases That Define the Debate Over Church and State.

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