Freedom's Sword

( 10 )

Overview

Before William Wallace... before Robert the Bruce... there was another Scottish hero...

In 1296, newly knighted by the King of the Scots, Andrew de Moray fights to defend his country against the forces of the ruthless invader, King Edward Longshanks of England. After a bloody defeat in battle, he is dragged in chains to an English dungeon.

Soon the young knight escapes. He returns to find Scotland under the ...

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More About This Book

Overview

Before William Wallace... before Robert the Bruce... there was another Scottish hero...

In 1296, newly knighted by the King of the Scots, Andrew de Moray fights to defend his country against the forces of the ruthless invader, King Edward Longshanks of England. After a bloody defeat in battle, he is dragged in chains to an English dungeon.

Soon the young knight escapes. He returns to find Scotland under the heel of a conqueror and his betrothed sheltering in the hills of the Black Isle.

Seizing his own castle, he raises the banner of Scottish freedom. Now he must lead the north of Scotland to rebellion in hope of defeating the English army sent to crush them.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461004158
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 3/22/2011
  • Pages: 262
  • Sales rank: 548,625
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Customer Reviews

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( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 24, 2011

    Fascinating tale of Scotland's Fight for Self Rule

    The price of Scotland's freedom from the King of England is paid for with blood, sweat and tears of those willing to sacrifice everything for love of country. *** This is a fast paced adventure story that tells the struggle of those willing to fight to free Scotland from the rule of the King of England in the 13th century. Andrew de Moray is forced to fight for his life and country after he and other key players in the Scottish royalty and military are killed or taken prisoner fighting the English army. Caitrina, who ends up marrying Moray, provides a tender and humanizing balance to the violence of war. This fast paced tale includes descriptions and depth of character that make the readers believe that they are witnessing history as it is happening. Author J.R. Tomlin researched culture, locations, language and participants to accurately portray events in this well written historical docudrama. The inclusion of strong male and female characters allowed the author to present the struggle for freedom and the personal toll that war in the middle ages had on Scotland's population.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2011

    Indie Book Review: Freedom's Sword

    I like historical fiction. I like military history. I like Scotland. So I was pretty sure I'd like Freedom's Sword, and as I turned off my kindle after reading the last word, I sat back, relaxed, and enjoyed my visit to the first Scottish War of Independence.
    As the tale opens we meet Andrew Moray, a new knight about to start his first battle. It goes horribly, he's taken captive, and after months in an English dungeon and a breath-taking escape, he returns to Scotland with a burning need to reconquer his homeland. From there he rounds up a force of like minded men and retakes northern Scotland from the English.

    It's a good story. I read most of it over the July 4th weekend, so a tale of booting out the English seemed especially resonant. Battle scenes are vibrant but not overblown. Details of place are deep enough to give an image of what is happening, but not so dense that you need to hack through them with a machete to find the plot. The history is well researched and alive. It's what moves the story along as opposed to being scenery.

    If I wanted anything from Freedom's Sword, it was more history. I'm well versed on medieval history, weaponry, and tactics, so I was following along pretty well, but a bit more on how Edward I ended up in charge, why they were rebelling against him, how things were different under Toom Tabard, why Robert the Bruce was a natural claimant to the throne, and how the Scottish political system worked would have been useful. With Tomlin's obvious love of the subject and deft writing, I would have been well pleased by another fifty pages of background.

    There was one jarring aspect of Freedom's Sword. For some reason it suddenly shifts POV to Caitrina, Andrew's Lady. And while I thought more or less everything involving Andrew was interesting, I rapidly lost interest when the story shifted to Caitrina. It's not that her story was badly written, nor was it boring per se; it just didn't have a lot to do with the rest of the plot. There's nothing that happens from Caitrina's POV that couldn't be dealt with in a few lines of dialog. There's nothing added by hopping to her head. She's so tangentially related to the plot that at one point 27 chapters go by without her. It almost feels like there was a plan to do a secondary story line of life on the home front, but somehow it didn't make it into the final story. Personally I would have liked to have seen that sort of a storyline. I think Tomlin could have done many fine things with it, but that will have to remain in the wish stage.

    Beyond that my only other complaint was the lack of idea of when thing happen. We get one date stamp in the beginning of the tale and another at the very end. Some in between would have made it easier to keep track of what was going on.

    All in all I enjoyed Freedom's Sword quiet a bit, and look forward to seeing what else Tomlin will come up with.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2011

    highly recommend

    This is the first of two books that a thoroughly enjoyed reading. I had never read anything on the subject of Scotland before. But would love to read more be this author. Highly reommend to any age group.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Freedom's Sword

    This focuses on the life of the Andrew de Moray between the battle of Dunbar and the battle of Stirling Bridge. After escaping from being held captive in an English castle, Moray returns home to start driving the English out of Scotland. He works with William Wallace, to win some key battles. This novel gives a good brief look at a Scottish hero who largely is overshadowed by Wallace in history. Its a quick and easy read and while the battle scenes are descriptive, they aren't graphic. It is dominated by Moray's imprisonment, escape, training his troops and battle, and it would have been if the brief scenes of his domestic life were expanded, or if there were more of them to balance out his military life. Caitrina is a fun character, with a bit of rebelliousness that will appeal to the modern reader, but its not done in a modern way. Caitrina's rebelliousness fits in well with her place in the world, and the medieval time period of the novel. I just wish the novel was a bit longer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 10, 2013

    Set in old Scotland it had my attention right away. This is a s

    Set in old Scotland it had my attention right away. This is a setting that I’ve used many times in my own writing and one that I particularly love. The author remains true to history and follows a knight that should be king through his trials and tribulations. It is extremely well written and the descriptions as well as characters are truly believable. You know right away who your hero is and I found myself yelling at him often as he makes the noble decisions and not the ones I think he should make.

    Lots of action, fighting and plenty of times to sit back and reflect on what life really was like back then. The author tossed in enough of everyday life to keep me interested and I kept saying to myself “yeah, that’s exactly how it must have been.” An enjoyable read and will keep you interested the whole way through.

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  • Posted November 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Recommended!

    I enjoyed this story of the Scottish early rebellion. It seems to be historically correct which I like, even if the story is a fictionalized account. I actually thought this book could have gone a bit further into depth of the characters, but that may take away from its historical roots.

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  • Posted November 27, 2012

    A must read for all English- Scot history fans

    The first revolt for freedom by the Scots after losing most of Scotland to Edward I of England was led by Andrew de Morey in 1297. At that time the English king was robbing the Scots of all their farm produce and their wool as well as paying heavy taxes to finance his French wars. Castle by castle the Scots regained castles held by the English. William Wallace,The Bruce and other lords joined in this struggle to throw off the English yoke. The book ends at the Battle of Sterling Bridge on September 11, 1297.
    This book is not for the squeamish or faint of heart. It would not be a good book for a club discussion.
    I would love to read more on Scot's history written by this author.

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  • Posted May 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    J.R. TOMLIN'S "FREEDOM'S SWORD" (A REVIEW)

    J.R. Tomlin's love for this time period shows as she writes yet another wonderful tale of the fight between Scotland and England. In this book which I am sure is a prequel to "A Kingdom's Cost," her hero is Andrew d Moray, who had pledged his loyalty to Scotland's current King John. In this story you meet James Douglas' father and begin to understand what took place before William Wallace was captured.
    Tomlin has created a fast paced, well -written read that any historical fiction lover will enjoy.
    -Kitty Bullard / Great Minds Think Aloud Book Club

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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