Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science

Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science

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by Robert Lomas
     
 

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In 1660, within a few months of the restoration of Charles II, a group of twelve men, including Robert Boyle and Christopher Wren, met in London to set up a society to study the mechanisms of nature. At a time when superstition and magic governed reason, the repressive dogma of Christian belief silenced many, and where post-war loyalties ruined careers, these men

Overview

In 1660, within a few months of the restoration of Charles II, a group of twelve men, including Robert Boyle and Christopher Wren, met in London to set up a society to study the mechanisms of nature. At a time when superstition and magic governed reason, the repressive dogma of Christian belief silenced many, and where post-war loyalties ruined careers, these men forbade the discussion of religion and politics at their meetings. The Royal Society was born and with it modern, experimental science. This situation seems unlikely enough, but the fact that the founding members came from both sides of a brutal Civil War makes its origins all the more astonishing. Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science is a fascinating study of the turbulent political, economic, and religious background to the formation of the Royal Society -- an era of war against the Dutch, the Great Plague, and the Great Fire of London. In particular, it reveals the ambitions of one man, Sir Robert Moray, the key driving force behind the society. Building on his detailed experience of another organization and the principles on which it was based, Moray was able to structure and gain finance for the Royal Society. This other organization, the "Invisible College" as Boyle called it, is known today as Freemasonry. Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science will make you reassess many of the key events of this period and will show how Freemasonry, supported by Charles II, was the guiding force behind the birth of modern science, under the cover of the Royal Society.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760754313
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
03/15/2004
Pages:
374
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Dr Robert Lomas gained a B.Sc with first-class honors in electronics before earning a Ph.D in solid-state physics with a particular interest in developing the theory and practice of crystalline semi-conducting hetro-junction photo-optic devices. He went on to work on the development of the first micro-processor chips and missile guidance systems before specializing in software development for command and control systems used by the Fire, Ambulance and Rescue Services. He later developed expertise in data mining and data capture techniques which he used to improve the response times of emergency services control rooms. For a while he was a visiting lecturer at the Fire Service Staff College where he taught data-based command and control. In 1986, he became a Freemason and quickly established himself as a popular lecturer on Masonic history before co-authoring the international best-sellers The Hiram Key, The Second Messiah, Uriel's Machine and The Book of Hiram. Since 2000 he has been writing on his own and has a string of best-sellers including Turning the Hiram Key, Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science, and The Man Who Invented the Twentieth Century. He also writes text books including Mastering Your Business Dissertation and specialist Masonic books such as The Secret Science of Masonic Initiation. His latest book is Freemasonry for BeginnersHe currently is a Visiting Fellow in Information Systems at Bradford University School of Management in Yorkshire, United Kingdom

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Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
StrangeCloud More than 1 year ago
What seems to be an extremely well researched book on the founding and development of Freemasony in England and Scotland and it's relationship to the founding and development of the Royal Society. The book presents a good case of how modern science really began with the support of Charles II under the disguise of the Royal Society, and how despite the civil war, the war against the Dutch, and natural disasters, men of various religious and poltiical views came together to form the Royal Society and put aside their squabbles in the pursuit of a unified goal. Lomas' writing is not the most compelling, but he does a very good job in backing up his assertions and conclusions.