Freemasonry

Overview

As one of the world's most famous mysterious societies, Freemasons remain the largest fraternal organization in the world. Some of the most heroic and creative thinkers in history belonged to the order, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Goethe, and Mozart. What links the philosophy of these great minds with the estimated four million Freemasons who actively maintain this ancient brotherhood today?

From sacred geometry to legendary Masonic rites, author and ...

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Overview

As one of the world's most famous mysterious societies, Freemasons remain the largest fraternal organization in the world. Some of the most heroic and creative thinkers in history belonged to the order, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Goethe, and Mozart. What links the philosophy of these great minds with the estimated four million Freemasons who actively maintain this ancient brotherhood today?

From sacred geometry to legendary Masonic rites, author and Freemason Mark Stavish divulges the philosophy of Masonry and the moral code that all Masons share. Learn how Masonry's higher degrees, particularly Scottish Rite, were influenced by occult beliefs and practices, and how Masonry is linked to King Solomon, Gothic architecture, magic practice, alchemy, and Qabala.

With exercises and suggested readings, this fascinating exploration is an essential learning tool that will answer questions and shed light on other Masonic mysteries, including initiation and the Lost Word.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738711485
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 9/1/2007
  • Pages: 268
  • Sales rank: 837,331
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Stavish (Pennsylvania) has been a long-time student of esotericism and is a frequent lecturer on ancient occult knowledge. Founder of the Institute for Hermetic Studies, he is the author of numerous articles on Western esotericism. In 2001 he established the Louis Claude de St. Martin Fund, a non-profit dedicated to advancing the study and practice of Western Esotericism. He has also served as a consultant to print and broadcast media and several documentaries. He holds undergraduate degrees in Theology and Communications and a Master's in Counseling.
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Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     xi
Foreword   Lon Milo DuQuette     xiii
Introduction: What Is the Secret of Freemasonry?     xix
How to Use This Book     1
What Is Freemasonry?     3
Operative and Speculative Masonry     4
Ashmole: Angel Magician and First Freemason     7
Robert Moray: Alchemist and Freemason     9
The First Grand Lodge     10
Anderson's Constitutions     11
Masonic Landmarks and the Making of a Movement     13
Philosophy, Fraternity, and Charity and the Making of a Man     15
Antients and Moderns: The Craft's First Crisis     15
Proliferation of the Craft     17
The Temple of Solomon and the Legend of Hiram Abiff     23
The Temple of Solomon     24
Solomon as Magician     29
The Picatrix     32
The Clavicula Salomonis     33
Shekinah: Goddesses of the Temple     35
Solomon and the Divine Feminine     36
Hiram Abiff and the Unique Mythology of Freemasonry     37
Masonic Initiation and Blue Lodge     43
Initiation: The Making of a Freemason     44
Isolation, Individuality, and the Beginning of MasonicAwakening     46
The Trestle Board: Masonic Instruction through Symbols     48
Symbolic Masonry: Blue Lodge and the Starry Vault of Heaven     50
The Entered Apprentice: The Gate of Initiation     51
The Fellowcraft: The Middle Chamber     55
The Degree of Master Mason: The Holy of Holies     58
A Mason in the World     61
The Pentagram     63
The Worldview of the Renaissance: The World Is Alive, and Magic Is Afoot     69
The World of Natural Magic     75
Angelic Magic     75
John Dee     76
The End of the Renaissance     79
Sacred Geometry, Gothic Cathedrals, and the Hermetic Arts in Stone     83
Temples, Talismans, and the Survival of the Stone     93
The Forty-seventh Problem of Euclid: The Great Symbol of Masonry     98
The Lost Word and the Masonic Quest     105
In the Beginning Was the Word     105
Reuchlin and the Miraculous Name     108
Fludd and the Rosicrucian Connection     112
The Masons Word     113
Scottish Rite and the Rise of Esoteric Masonry     125
Origins of Scottish Rite: The French Connection     125
"Ordo Ab Chaos"      127
The Degrees     128
Albert Pike and the Renewal of Scottish Rite     129
Morals and Dogma: The Unofficial Bible of Scottish Rite     131
The Royal Art: Freemasonry and Human Evolution     132
Occult Masonry in the Eighteenth Century     141
Occult Masonry     141
Rosicrucianism     142
The Elus Cohen     147
Egyptian Masonry     150
Adoptive Masonry     153
Hermetic-Alchemical Rites and the Illuminati     154
Conclusion     160
York Rite and the Survival of the Knights Templar     165
Royal Arch: Capstone of Masonry     166
Cryptic Degrees and the Lost Word     167
Chivalric Degrees     170
Origin of the Templars     171
Fall of the Templars and Their Survival     172
Templars in York Rite Masonry     174
Templars and the Occult     175
Freemasonry and the European Occult Revival     181
Co-Masonry and the Invisible Adepts Revisited     182
Martinism and Rosicrucianism Reborn     186
The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn     190
Knights Templar Anew     192
Conclusion: Modern Masonry: Much Ado About Nothing, or the Revival of the Lost Word?     199
Afterword   Charles S. Canning     203
Sacred Geometry and the Masonic Tradition, John Michael Greer     207
Symbols of the Tracing Boards and the Degrees     221
Excerpts from Morals and Dogma on the Three Degrees of Masonry     226
Index     231
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