Freemasons (Little Books About Big Things) [NOOK Book]

Overview

  Freemasonry is fascinating because it’s mysterious. Freemasons trace their roots to the stonemasons of ancient and medieval times—the men who, literally, built the world, from King Solomon’s Temple to the cathedrals of Europe.

In this fascinating book focusing on the Craft’s history and lore, you’ll explore milestones (such as: The oldest Masonic document in existence is the Regius Manuscript, an epic poem reputedly written in Middle English that’s said to date from 1390) along with other details (like ...

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Freemasons (Little Books About Big Things)

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Overview

  Freemasonry is fascinating because it’s mysterious. Freemasons trace their roots to the stonemasons of ancient and medieval times—the men who, literally, built the world, from King Solomon’s Temple to the cathedrals of Europe.

In this fascinating book focusing on the Craft’s history and lore, you’ll explore milestones (such as: The oldest Masonic document in existence is the Regius Manuscript, an epic poem reputedly written in Middle English that’s said to date from 1390) along with other details (like this: The idea of a “secret handshake” or “grip” has long been a way for Freemasons to identify themselves to each other).

These are just a few of the entertaining facts you’ll find in Freemasons (Little Books About Big Things):

·         Not every man who is a Freemason today is an “Operative” Mason (a working stonemason).

·         In 1775, Prince Hall and fourteen other free black men were admitted into Irish Lodge No. 441, a Lodge affiliated with the British infantry posted to the colonies. Their acceptance marked the first time that men of color were made Masons in the United States.

·         Masons don’t recruit new members.

·         Only Brethren who have reached the degree of Master Mason are permitted to wear a ring, lapel pin, watch fob, necklace, or other accessory bearing the Masonic square and compass, so if you spot one you can expect the wearer is a member of the Craft.

·         During the initiation ceremony for an Entered Apprentice, the candidate is blindfolded—or “hoodwinked”—before being led into the ceremonial chamber. . . . It represents the candidate’s move from the “profane darkness” to the “light” of the Craft.

·         A cowan is a phony Mason, a poser, an eavesdropper, or a Mason of a lower degree, such as an Entered Apprentice, who tries to pretend he knows more than he does.

·         George Washington was initiated as an Entered Apprentice in Fredericksburg Lodge No. 4 of Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1752.

·         Freemasonry likes math. Students of the Craft find myriad ways to interpret the significance of numbers that recur in Masonic rituals and lore.

Ever wonder why Freemasons wear aprons? Or what the connection between Masons and Shriners is? You’ll find the answers inside . . . and many more!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781435147157
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 10/21/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 315,574
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Bob Bailey Mucker is an author, world traveler, and iconoclast who fondly recalls the days of vinyl records and appreciates those who appreciate the Masonic ideals of square-dealing and restraint. His interests include history, literature, music, and beer-separately or concurrently. He resides in the eastern United States where he was born and raised.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 7, 2014

    Do not WASTE your money or time..

    Not worth the Money..
    free books have more info.

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