The French Revolution

The French Revolution

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by Thomas Carlyle
     
 

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The French Revolution is a work by Scottish essayist, philosopher, and historian Thomas Carlyle. It is a massive, even heroic undertaking - one which hadn't been achieved before and has not since. Carlyle's literary style is unique: written in the present tense first-person plural, A History follows along chronologically as the events of the Revolution unfold

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Overview

The French Revolution is a work by Scottish essayist, philosopher, and historian Thomas Carlyle. It is a massive, even heroic undertaking - one which hadn't been achieved before and has not since. Carlyle's literary style is unique: written in the present tense first-person plural, A History follows along chronologically as the events of the Revolution unfold with sweeping, apocalyptic grandeur. The reader feels as though he or she were observing, participating almost in, the events occurring on the Paris streets.

The reader is carried along day-by-day, month-by-month as the as the inevitable disaster comes to life: the meeting of the Estates General, the Tennis Court Oath, the march on Versailles, the varied attempts to draft a constitution, the fall out between the royal couple and the Revolutionary Government, the escape attempt to Varennes, the beheading of the king and queen, the "Reign of Terror," and lastly the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte as he famously cleared the streets with a "whiff of grapeshot."


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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789635274277
Publisher:
Sheba Blake Publishing
Publication date:
06/28/2015
Series:
The French Revolution
Sold by:
Content 2 Connect
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
478,590
File size:
1 MB

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CHAPTER II. REALISED IDEALS. SuOH a changed France have we; and a changed Louis. Changed, truly; and farther than thou yet seest! To the eye of History many things, in that sick-room of Louis, are now visible, which to the Courtiers there present were invisible. For indeed it is well said, 'in every object there ' is inexhaustible meaning; the eye sees in it what the eye ' brings means of seeing.' To Newton and to Newton's Dog Diamond, what a different pair of Universes; while the painting on the optical retina of both was, most likely, the same! Let the Reader here, in this sick-room of Louis, endeavour to look with the mind too. Time was when men could (so to speak) of a given man, by nourishing and decorating him with fit appliances, to the due pitch, make themselves a King, almost as the Bees do; and what was still more to the purpose, loyally obey him when .made. The man so nourished and decorated, thenceforth named royal, does verily bear rule; and is said, and even thought, to be, for example, 'prosecuting conquests in Flanders,' when he lets himself like luggage be carried thither: and no light luggage; covering miles of road. For he has his unblushing Chateauroux, with her bandboxes and rouge-pots, at his side; so that, at every new station, a wooden gallery must be run up between their lodgings. He has not only his Maison-Bouche, and Valetaille without end, but his very Troop of Players, with their pasteboard 1744-74. coulisses, thunder-barrels, their kettles, fiddles, stage-wardrobes, portable larders (and chaffering and quarrelling enough); all mounted in wagons, tumbrils, second-hand chaises, sufficient not to conquer Flanders, but the patience of the world. Withsuch a flood of loud jingling appurtenances does he lumber along, prosecuting his conquests...

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