The French Revolution (THE GREAT CLASSICS LIBRARY)

The French Revolution (THE GREAT CLASSICS LIBRARY)

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by Thomas Carlyle
     
 

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Carlyle's history of the French revolution, from 1837, remains one of the major works on the sweeping events of that period. He brought a complex literary style to his account, which has an energetic, almost hallucinatory rhythm despite being rigorously anchored in numerous prime sources. For Carlyle, chaotic events demanded what he called 'heroes' to take control

Overview

Carlyle's history of the French revolution, from 1837, remains one of the major works on the sweeping events of that period. He brought a complex literary style to his account, which has an energetic, almost hallucinatory rhythm despite being rigorously anchored in numerous prime sources. For Carlyle, chaotic events demanded what he called 'heroes' to take control over the competing forces erupting within society. While not denying the importance of economic and practical explanations for events, he saw these forces as 'spiritual' – the hopes and aspirations of people that took the form of ideas, and were often ossified into ideologies ("formulas" or "isms", as he called them). In Carlyle's view, only dynamic individuals could master events and direct these spiritual energies effectively: as soon as ideological 'formulas' replaced heroic human action, society became dehumanised.

Dickens used Carlyle's work as a primary source for the events of the French Revolution in his novel A Tale of Two Cities.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015695779
Publisher:
Revenant
Publication date:
09/19/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Thomas Carlyle (1795 – 1881) was a Scottish satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher during the Victorian era.[1] He called economics "the dismal science", wrote articles for the Edinburgh Encyclopedia, and became a controversial social commentator.

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The French Revolution 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
willyvan More than 1 year ago
This extraordinary work is more like a film scenario than a modern history. Its flashes of lightning pick out and illuminate dramatic scenes, vividly portrayed, like King Louis' doomed flight to Varennes. Carlyle famously described 'the incorruptible sea-green Robespierre'. Carlyle acknowledges, contrary to convention, "there is no period to be met with, in which the general Twenty-five Millions of France suffered less than in this period which they name Reign of Terror." He praises the revolution as "Surely a great phenomenon: nay it is a transcendental one, overstepping all rules and experience; the crowning phenomenon of our Modern Time."
ANONYMOUS3333 More than 1 year ago
A LIVELY,STILL ENTERTAINING ACCOUNT. CAN BE READ WITHOUT FEAR OF DELVING DEEPLY INYO THE SEEDY CONSPIRATORIAL MECHANICS OF THE EXTENDED BLOODY REVOLUTION.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I want to learn more about the french revoulution and im a kid. Is this book good for a kid to read?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Will write more when I have finished book.