French Revolutionary Syndicalism and the Public Sphere

Overview

This study explores the interaction of the Confederation Generale du Travail (CGT) with the French public sphere, between 1900 and 1920. The CGT supported federalist worker control of industry, and, by World War I, had developed a distinctively productivist discourse, emphasizing increased material output through direction of the economy. Kenneth Tucker examines the triumph of this productivism in contrast with other visions of society and the future, while giving a Habermasian twist to the recent lingusitic turn...
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Overview

This study explores the interaction of the Confederation Generale du Travail (CGT) with the French public sphere, between 1900 and 1920. The CGT supported federalist worker control of industry, and, by World War I, had developed a distinctively productivist discourse, emphasizing increased material output through direction of the economy. Kenneth Tucker examines the triumph of this productivism in contrast with other visions of society and the future, while giving a Habermasian twist to the recent lingusitic turn in labor history.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...this is a dense and ambitious study of French revolutionary syndicalism during the belle epoque that should be of interest to labor historians as well as to those interested in contemporary sociological theory." Elizabeth Sage, Journal of Modern History

"Kenneth Tucker is to be congratulated for this formidable intellectual accomplishment....Scholars and students in history, sociology, and anthropology will find Tucker's work a valuable educational experience." Neil Smelser, Director, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford

"French Revolutionary Syndication and the Public Sphere is an original and highly documented book that explores the evolution of French syndicalist organization." Alberto Spektorowski, AJS

"...a sensitive readeing of an historical case used to motivate a critical but sympathetic critique of contemporary social theory, and particularly the work of Habermas." Christopher K. Ansell, Social Forces

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Prologue 3
1 The Belle Epoque and revolutionary syndicalism 13
2 Syndicalism, the New Orthodoxy, and the postmodern turn 33
3 Public discourse and civil society: Habermas, Bourdieu, and the new social movements 51
4 The liberal and proletarian public spheres in nineteenth-century France 71
5 The fin-de-siecle public sphere, the academic field, and the social sciences 104
6 Pelloutier, Sorel, and revolutionary syndicalism 131
7 Reformulating revolutionary syndicalism 159
8 Toward a new public sphere: Taylorism, consumerism, and the postwar CGT 183
9 The legacy of syndicalism 209
Notes 218
Index 276
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